Results for 'Danielle Naegeli'

993 found
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  1.  7
    Investigating Word Order Emergence: Constraints From Cognition and Communication.Marieke Schouwstra, Danielle Naegeli & Simon Kirby - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    How do cognitive biases and mechanisms from learning and use interact when a system of language conventions emerges? We investigate this question by focusing on how transitive events are conveyed in silent gesture production and interaction. Silent gesture experiments have been used to investigate cognitive biases that shape utterances produced in the absence of a conventional language system. In this mode of communication, participants do not follow the dominant order of their native language, and instead condition the structure on the (...)
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  2.  20
    From improvisation to learning: How naturalness and systematicity shape language evolution.Yasamin Motamedi, Lucie Wolters, Danielle Naegeli, Simon Kirby & Marieke Schouwstra - 2022 - Cognition 228 (C):105206.
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  3. Autonomy-Based Reasons for Limitarianism.Danielle Zwarthoed - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (5):1181-1204.
    This paper aims to provide autonomy-based reasons in favour of limitarianism. Limitarianism affirms it is of primary moral importance that no one gets too much. The paper challenges the standard assumption that having more material resources always increases autonomy. It expounds five mechanisms through which having too much material wealth might undermine autonomy. If these hypotheses are true, a theory of justice guided by a concern for autonomy will support a limitarian distribution of wealth. Finally, the paper discusses two issues (...)
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  4.  10
    Frege’s Logic.Danielle Macbeth - 2005 - Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
    The most enlightening examination to date of the developments of Frege's thinking about his logic, this book introduces a new kind of logical language, one that ...
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  5.  77
    What's Critical about Vulnerability? Rethinking Interdependence, Recognition, and Power.Danielle Petherbridge - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):589-604.
    Images of vulnerability have populated the philosophical landscape from Hobbes to Hegel, Levinas to Foucault, often designating a sense of corporeal susceptibility to injury, or of being threatened or wounded and therefore have been predominantly associated with violence, finitude, or mortality. More recently, feminist theorists such as Judith Butler and Adriana Cavarero have begun to rethink corporeal vulnerability as a critical or ethical category, one based on our primary interdependence and intercorporeality. However, many contemporary theorists continue to associate vulnerability with (...)
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  6.  44
    The Critical Theory of Axel Honneth.Danielle Petherbridge (ed.) - 2013 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
  7.  13
    The Critical Theory of Axel Honneth.Danielle Petherbridge - 2013 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
  8.  48
    Axel Honneth: Critical Essays: With a Reply by Axel Honneth.Danielle Petherbridge (ed.) - 2011 - Brill Academic.
    _Axel Honneth: Critical Essays_ brings together critical interpretations of the work of Axel Honneth, from his earliest to his most recent writings, together with a comprehensive reply by Honneth that provides significant insights and clarifications into his project overall.
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  9.  19
    Sexting and mandatory reporting: ethical issues in youth psychotherapy.Danielle Nelson, Tilman Schulte, Wendy Packman & E. L. Bunge - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (3):205-214.
    ABSTRACT Engaging in sexting, such as sending or receiving of sexual words, pictures, or videos via technology, is a common behavior in minors and a rising trend. This study aimed to understand the ethical dilemmas that clinicians face when working with minors that engage in sexting under current mandated reporting standards. For this study, 178 graduate students and licensed clinicians who work with minors in the state of California completed an online survey involving vignettes concerning issues of sexting behaviors in (...)
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  10. Disclosure and Consent to Medical Research Participation.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):195-219.
    Most regulations and guidelines require that potential research participants be told a great deal of information during the consent process. Many of these documents, and most of the scholars who consider the consent process, assume that all this information must be disclosed because it must all be understood. However, a wide range of studies surveying apparently competent participants in clinical trials around the world show that many do not understand key aspects of what they have been told. The standard view (...)
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  11.  24
    The (Re) Production of the Genetically Related Body in Law, Technology and Culture: Mitochondria Replacement Therapy.Danielle Griffiths - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (3):196-209.
    Advances in medicine in the latter half of the twentieth century have dramatically altered human bodies, expanding choices around what we do with them and how they connect to other bodies. Nowhere is this more so than in the area of reproductive technologies. Reproductive medicine and the laws surrounding it in the UK have reconfigured traditional boundaries surrounding parenthood and the family. Yet culture and regulation surrounding RTs have combined to try to ensure that while traditional boundaries may be pushed, (...)
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  12.  37
    When Extremists Win: Cultural Transmission Via Iterated Learning When Populations Are Heterogeneous.Danielle J. Navarro, Amy Perfors, Arthur Kary, Scott D. Brown & Chris Donkin - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (7):2108-2149.
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  13.  20
    When Extremists Win: Cultural Transmission Via Iterated Learning When Populations Are Heterogeneous.Danielle J. Navarro, Andrew Perfors, Arthur Kary, Scott D. Brown & Chris Donkin - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (7):2108-2149.
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  14.  93
    Is Formal Ethics Training Merely Cosmetic? A Study of Ethics Training and Ethical Organizational Culture.Danielle E. Warren, Joseph P. Gaspar & William S. Laufer - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (1):85-117.
    ABSTRACT:U.S. Organizational Sentencing Guidelines provide firms with incentives to develop formal ethics programs to promote ethical organizational cultures and thereby decrease corporate offenses. Yet critics argue such programs are cosmetic. Here we studied bank employees before and after the introduction of formal ethics training—an important component of formal ethics programs—to examine the effects of training on ethical organizational culture. Two years after a single training session, we find sustained, positive effects on indicators of an ethical organizational culture (observed unethical behavior, (...)
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  15. Lies, Control, and Consent: A Response to Dougherty and Manson.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):446-461.
    Tom Dougherty argues that culpably deceiving another person into sex is seriously wrong no matter what the content about which she is deceived. We argue that his explanation of why deception invalidates consent has extremely implausible implications. Though we reject Dougherty’s explanation, we defend his verdict about deception and consent to sex. We argue that he goes awry by conflating the disclosure requirement for consent and the understanding requirement. When these are distinguished, we can identify how deceptive disclosure invalidates consent. (...)
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  16. Patient-Funded Trials: Opportunity or Liability?Danielle M. Wenner, Alex John London & Jonathan Kimmelman - 2015 - Cell Stem Cell 17 (2):135-137.
    Patient-funded trials are gaining traction as a means of accelerating clinical translation. However, such trials sidestep mechanisms that promote rigor, relevance, efficiency, and fairness. We recommend that funding bodies or research institutions establish mechanisms for merit review of patient-funded trials, and we offer some basic criteria for evaluating PFT protocols.
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  17.  31
    Listening to the calls of the wild: The role of experience in linking language and cognition in young infants.Danielle R. Perszyk & Sandra R. Waxman - 2016 - Cognition 153 (C):175-181.
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  18.  47
    Strategic Ambiguity: Protecting Emphasized Femininity and Hegemonic Masculinity in the Hookup Culture.Danielle M. Currier - 2013 - Gender and Society 27 (5):704-727.
    Hooking up is a term commonly used in contemporary American society to refer to sexual activity between two people who are not in a committed romantic relationship. Data show that although many college students are engaging in hookups, there is no consensus on how to define a hookup. The author uses the concept of “strategic ambiguity” to explore the intentionality and usefulness of the vagueness of this term. Specific to hookups, strategic ambiguity is when individuals use the term “hookup” to (...)
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  19. Recognition, Vulnerability and Trust.Danielle Petherbridge - 2021 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 29 (1):1-23.
    ABSTRACT This paper examines the question of whether recognition relations are based on trust. Theorists of recognition have acknowledged the ways in which recognition relations make us vulnerable to others but have largely neglected the underlying ‘webs of trust’ in which such relations are embedded. In this paper, I consider the ways in which the theories of recognition developed by Jürgen Habermas and Axel Honneth, not only point to our mutual vulnerability but also implicitly rely upon mutual relations of trust. (...)
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  20.  20
    Diagrammatic reasoning in Frege’s Begriffsschrift.Danielle Macbeth - 2012 - Synthese 186 (1):289-314.
    In Part III of his 1879 logic Frege proves a theorem in the theory of sequences on the basis of four definitions. He claims in Grundlagen that this proof, despite being strictly deductive, constitutes a real extension of our knowledge, that it is ampliative rather than merely explicative. Frege furthermore connects this idea of ampliative deductive proof to what he thinks of as a fruitful definition, one that draws new lines. My aim is to show that we can make good (...)
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  21.  31
    Disclosure and Consent to Medical Research Participation.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2015 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 12 (2):195-219.
    Most regulations and guidelines require that potential research participants be told a great deal of information during the consent process. Many of these documents, and most of the scholars who consider the consent process, assume that all this information must be disclosed because it must all be understood. However, a wide range of studies surveying apparently competent participants in clinical trials around the world show that many do not understand key aspects of what they have been told. The standard view (...)
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  22.  20
    The hypothesized relationship between accountability and ethical behavior.Danielle Beu & M. Ronald Buckley - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 34 (1):57 - 73.
    Unethical behavior is important to study because it may have an adverse influence on organizational performance. This paper is an attempt to better understand why individuals behave as they do when faced with ethical dilemmas. We first explore the definition, theories and models of ethical behaviors and accountability. This discussion of societal ethics and accountability as forms of social control segues into a discussion of how accountability may influence ethical behaviors. Based on the business ethics and accountability literatures, we suggest (...)
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  23. Clearing conceptual space for cognitivist motivational internalism.Danielle Bromwich - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 148 (3):343 - 367.
    Cognitivist motivational internalism is the thesis that, if one believes that 'It is right to ϕ', then one will be motivated to ϕ. This thesis—which captures the practical nature of morality—is in tension with a Humean constraint on belief: belief cannot motivate action without the assistance of a conceptually independent desire. When defending cognitivist motivational internalism it is tempting to either argue that the Humean constraint only applies to non-moral beliefs or that moral beliefs only motivate ceteris paribus . But (...)
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  24.  10
    Disclosure and Consent to Medical Research Participation.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4).
    Most regulations and guidelines require that potential research participants be told a great deal of information during the consent process. Many of these documents, and most of the scholars who consider the consent process, assume that all this information must be disclosed because it must all be understood. However, a wide range of studies surveying apparently competent participants in clinical trials around the world show that many do not understand key aspects of what they have been told. The standard view (...)
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  25.  47
    Is Formal Ethics Training Merely Cosmetic? in advance.Danielle E. Warren, Joseph Gaspar & William S. Laufer - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (1):85-117.
    ABSTRACT:U.S. Organizational Sentencing Guidelines provide firms with incentives to develop formal ethics programs to promote ethical organizational cultures and thereby decrease corporate offenses. Yet critics argue such programs are cosmetic. Here we studied bank employees before and after the introduction of formal ethics training—an important component of formal ethics programs—to examine the effects of training on ethical organizational culture. Two years after a single training session, we find sustained, positive effects on indicators of an ethical organizational culture (observed unethical behavior, (...)
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  26. Informed consent to HIV cure research.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph R. Millum - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (2):108-113.
    Trials with highly unfavourable risk–benefit ratios for participants, like HIV cure trials, raise questions about the quality of the consent of research participants. Why, it may be asked, would a person with HIV who is doing well on antiretroviral therapy be willing to jeopardise his health by enrolling in such a trial? We distinguish three concerns: first, how information is communicated to potential participants; second, participants’ motivations for enrolling in potentially high risk research with no prospect of direct benefit; and (...)
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  27. Motivational Internalism and the Challenge of Amoralism.Danielle Bromwich - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):452-471.
    Motivational internalism is the thesis that captures the commonplace thought that moral judgements are necessarily motivationally efficacious. But this thesis appears to be in tension with another aspect of our ordinary moral experience. Proponents of the contrast thesis, motivational externalism, cite everyday examples of amoralism to demonstrate that it is conceptually possible to be completely unmoved by what seem to be sincere first-person moral judgements. This paper argues that the challenge of amoralism gives us no reason to reject or modify (...)
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  28.  52
    The Social Value Requirement in Research: From the Transactional to the Basic Structure Model of Stakeholder Obligations.Danielle M. Wenner - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (6):25-32.
    It has long been taken for granted that clinical research involving human subjects is ethical only if it holds out the prospect of producing socially valuable knowledge. Recently, this social value requirement has come under scrutiny, with prominent ethicists arguing that the social value requirement cannot be substantiated as an ethical limit on clinical research, and others attempting to offer new support. In this paper, I argue that both criticisms and existing defenses of the social value requirement are predicated on (...)
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  29.  16
    Why Plato Wrote.Danielle S. Allen - 2010 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Why Plato Wrote_ argues that Plato was not only the world’s first systematic political philosopher, but also the western world’s first think-tank activist and message man. Shows that Plato wrote to change Athenian society and thereby transform Athenian politics Offers accessible discussions of Plato’s philosophy of language and political theory Selected by Choice as an Outstanding Academic Title for 2011.
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  30.  46
    Nondomination and the Limits of Relational Autonomy.Danielle M. Wenner - 2020 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 13 (2):28-48.
    Relational autonomy theorists attempt to accommodate social embeddedness within a conception of autonomy. These attempts are conceptually messy, at best, and category errors, at worst. Rejecting the liberal conception of autonomy due to feminist concerns is more helpfully answered by the neorepublican notion of freedom as nondomination. The conception of freedom as nondomination captures the values that motivate the relational turn in moral and political theory and does so in a conceptually neater way than attempting to accommodate those concerns in (...)
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  31.  11
    Ethical decision–making: A multidimensional construct.Danielle S. Beu, M. Ronald Buckley & Michael G. Harvey - 2003 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 12 (1):88–107.
    Poor ethical decision–making costs industry billions of dollars a year and damages the images of corporations. Thus, by answering the question ‘Why do individuals behave as they do when confronted with ethical issues?’ ethical theory can provide businesses with a means to create a more ethical climate and a more successful operation. This study tested the Ethical Decision–Making Model with accountability (Beu & Buckley 2001), which uses theory that suggests that ethical behavior is influenced by the individual, the issue, social (...)
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  32.  19
    Two- and Four-Year-Olds Learn to Adapt Referring Expressions to Context: Effects of Distracters and Feedback on Referential Communication.Danielle Matthews, Jessica Butcher, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):184-210.
    Children often refer to things ambiguously but learn not to from responding to clarification requests. We review and explore this learning process here. In Study 1, eighty-four 2- and 4-year-olds were tested for their ability to request stickers from either (a) a small array with one dissimilar distracter or (b) a large array containing similar distracters. When children made ambiguous requests, they received either general feedback or specific questions about which of two options they wanted. With training, children learned to (...)
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  33.  2
    A Conversation with Lewis Gordon on Race in Australia.Danielle Davis - 2008 - CLR James Journal 14 (1):296-303.
    Danielle Davis : Firstly, I wonder if you could briefly outline your position on mixed race identities. Are they desirable? My concern about these categories/identities is they present US with a double-edged sword. That is, on the one hand they perhaps enable difference, yet they also have the capacity to erase it. Lewis Gordon : The first part of the question is loaded, Danielle. When you say "desirable", what follows are other questions. "To whom?" "In what sense?" "For (...)
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  34.  70
    Should Future Generations be Content with Plastic Trees and Singing Electronic Birds?Danielle Zwarthoed - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (2):219-236.
    The aim of this paper is to determine whether the present generation should preserve non-human living things for future generations, even if in the future all the contributions these organisms currently make to human survival in decent conditions were performed by adequate technology and future people's preferences were satisfied by this state of affairs. The paper argues it would be wrong to leave a world without non-human living plants, animals and other organisms to future generations, because such a world would (...)
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  35.  21
    The possibility of deliberate norm-adherence in AI.Danielle Swanepoel - 2020 - Ethics and Information Technology 23 (2):157-163.
    Moral agency status is often given to those individuals or entities which act intentionally within a society or environment. In the past, moral agency has primarily been focused on human beings and some higher-order animals. However, with the fast-paced advancements made in artificial intelligence, we are now quickly approaching the point where we need to ask an important question: should we grant moral agency status to AI? To answer this question, we need to determine the moral agency status of these (...)
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  36. Introduction: Encounters between bioethics and the posthumanities.Danielle Sands - 2022 - In Bioethics and the Posthumanities. New York, NY: Routledge.
     
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  37. Understanding complexity in the human brain.Danielle S. Bassett & Michael S. Gazzaniga - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (5):200.
  38. Can informed consent to research be adapted to risk?Danielle Bromwich & Annette Rid - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (7):521-528.
    The current ethical and regulatory framework for research is often charged with burdening investigators and impeding socially valuable research. To address these concerns, a growing number of research ethicists argue that informed consent should be adapted to the risks of research participation. This would require less rigorous consent standards in low-risk research than in high-risk research. However, the current discussion is restricted to cases of research in which the risks of research participation are outweighed by the potential clinical benefits for (...)
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  39.  19
    When Ethical Tones at the Top Conflict: Adapting Priority Rules to Reconcile Conflicting Tones.Danielle E. Warren, Marietta Peytcheva & Joseph P. Gaspar - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (4):559-582.
    ABSTRACT:While tone at the top is widely regarded as an important predictor of ethical behavior in organizations, we argue that recent research overlooks the various conflicting ethical tones present in many multi-organizational work settings. Further, we propose that the resolution processes promulgated in many firms and professional associations to reconcile this conflict reinforce the tone at the bottom or a tone at the top of the employee’s organization, and that both of these approaches can conflict with the tone at the (...)
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  40. Hybrid approaches to peace and justice : the case of post-genocide Rwanda.Danielle Beswick - 2017 - In Rosa Freedman & Nicolas Lemay-Hébert (eds.), Hybridity: law, culture and development. Routledge.
     
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  41.  66
    Remissão sintomática e qualidade de vida em pacientes com depressão maior tratados com antidepressivo: um estudo prospectivo.Danielle Soares Bio, Érika Leonardo de Souza & Ricardo Alberto Moreno - 2011 - Revista Aletheia 34:151-162.
    Este estudo teve como objetivo estimar a Qualidade de Vida (QV) em pacientes com transtorno depressivo maior antes e após tratamento antidepressivo eficaz. Participaram do estudo 26 indivíduos (18 a 65 anos) com episódio agudo de Transtorno Depressivo Maior, segundo critérios do DSM-IV. A duração do..
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  42.  13
    Metabolite-Mediated Interactions Between Bacteria and Fungi.Danielle M. Troppens & John P. Morrissey - 2012 - In Witzany (ed.), Biocommunication of Fungi. Springer. pp. 207--218.
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  43.  26
    L'ordonnance de Villers-Cotterêts et la langue française: histoire ou interprétation?Danielle Trudeau - 1983 - Bibliothèque d'Humanisme Et Renaissance 45 (3):461-472.
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  44.  15
    As cidades e as vozes: histórias de migração em espaços urbanos do Sul do Brasil na metade do século XX.Danielle Heberle Viegas - 2018 - Ágora – Revista de História e Geografia 20 (1):16.
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  45. Elementary girls' science reading at home and school.Danielle J. Ford, Nancy W. Brickhouse, Pamela Lottero‐Perdue & Julie Kittleson - 2006 - Science Education 90 (2):270-288.
  46.  30
    When Are Tutorial Dialogues More Effective Than Reading?Danielle E. Matthews, Kurt VanLehn, Arthur C. Graesser, G. Tanner Jackson, Pamela Jordan, Andrew Olney & Andrew Carolyn P. RosAc - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (1):3-62.
    It is often assumed that engaging in a one‐on‐one dialogue with a tutor is more effective than listening to a lecture or reading a text. Although earlier experiments have not always supported this hypothesis, this may be due in part to allowing the tutors to cover different content than the noninteractive instruction. In 7 experiments, we tested the interaction hypothesis under the constraint that (a) all students covered the same content during instruction, (b) the task domain was qualitative physics, (c) (...)
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  47.  36
    The Social Value of Knowledge and the Responsiveness Requirement for International Research.Danielle M. Wenner - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (2):97-104.
    Ethicists have long recognized that two necessary features of ethical research are scientific validity and social value. Yet despite a significant literature surrounding the validity component of this dictate, until recently there has been little attention paid to unpacking what the social value component might require. This article introduces a framework for assessing the social value of research, and in particular, for determining whether a given research program is likely to have significant social value of the kind necessary to fulfill (...)
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  48.  50
    Parental Education and Expensive Consumption Habits.Danielle Zwarthoed - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy (2):825-843.
    The aim of this article is to investigate the general and special obligations of parents with respect to the shaping of consumption habits, from a liberal egalitarian perspective. The article argues that, in virtue of them being well placed to shape the next generation's consumption habits, parents have a duty of justice to prevent their children from developing expensive consumption habits in order to enable them to leave their fair share to others. In virtue of the special relationship they have (...)
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  49.  20
    Why Sustainability Principles should integrate Global Justice Concerns.Danielle Zwarthoed - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (3):251-254.
    Curren and Metzger develop a normative account of sustainability without prejudging the relationships between sustainability and global justice. This commentary propounds an alternative methodology...
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  50.  9
    Do social utility judgments influence attentional processing?Danielle M. Shore & Erin A. Heerey - 2013 - Cognition 129 (1):114-122.
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