Results for 'Tom Stapleford'

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Tom Stapleford
University of Notre Dame
  1.  16
    Tom Sorell, G. A. J. Rogers, and Jill Kraye, Eds. , 'Scientia' in Early Modern Philosophy: Seventeenth-Century Thinkers on Demonstrative Knowledge From First Principles . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Scott Stapleford - 2010 - Philosophy in Review 30 (6):438-441.
  2. Science, Technology & the Good Life: Perspectives on Virtue in Modern Science & Technology.Emanuele Ratti & Tom Stapleford (eds.) - forthcoming
  3.  31
    Time and Truth: The Presentism-Eternalism Debate: Tom Stoneham.Tom Stoneham - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (2):201-218.
    There are many questions we can ask about time, but perhaps the most fundamental is whether there are metaphysically interesting differences between past, present and future events. An eternalist believes in a block universe: past, present and future events are all on an equal footing. A gradualist believes in a growing block: he agrees with the eternalist about the past and the present but not about the future. A presentist believes that what is present has a special status. My first (...)
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  4. Principles of Biomedical Ethics / Tom L. Beauchamp, James F. Childress.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    This is an extremely thorough revision of the leading textbook of bioethics. The authors have made many improvements in style, organization, argument and content. These changes reflect advances in the bioethics literature over the past five years. The most dramatic expansions of the text are in the comprehensiveness with which the authors treat different currents in ethical theory and the greater breadth and depth of their discussion of public policy and public health issues. In every chapter, readers will find new (...)
     
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  5. The Inaugural Address: Kantian Modality: Tom Baldwin.Tom Baldwin - 2002 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):1–24.
    Kant's claim that modality is a 'category' provides an approach to modality to be contrasted with Lewis's reductive analysis. Lewis's position is unsatisfactory, since it depends on an inherently modal conception of a world. This suggests that modality is 'primitive'; and the Kantian position is a prima facie plausible position of this kind, which is filled out by considering the relationship between modality and inference. This provides a context for comparing the Kantian position with Wright's non-cognitivist 'conventionalism'. Wright's position is (...)
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  6. Epistemic Value Monism and the Swamping Problem.Scott Stapleford - 2016 - Ratio 29 (3):283-297.
    Many deontologists explain the epistemic value of justification in terms of its instrumental role in promoting truth – the original source of value in the epistemic domain. The swamping problem for truth monism appears to make this position indefensible, at least for those monists who maintain the superiority of knowledge to merely true belief. I propose a new solution to the swamping problem that allows monists to maintain the greater epistemic value of knowledge over merely true belief. My trick is (...)
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  7. Multi-Dimensional Utility and the Index Number Problem: Jeremy Bentham, J. S. Mill, and Qualitative Hedonism: Tom Warke.Tom Warke - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (2):176-203.
    This article develops an unconventional perspective on the utilitarianism of Bentham and Mill in at least four areas. First, it is shown that both authors conceived of utility as irreducibly multi-dimensional, and that Bentham in particular was very much aware of the ambiguity that multi-dimensionality imposes upon optimal choice under the greatest happiness principle. Secondly, I argue that any attribution of intrinsic worth to any form of human behaviour violates the first principles of Bentham's and Mill's utilitarianism, and that this (...)
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  8.  38
    Completing Epistemic Oughts.Scott Stapleford - 2014 - Philosophical Forum 45 (2):133-148.
    Our intuitions about what a person epistemically ought or ought not believe are sometimes quite clear. Keith DeRose and Richard Feldman have devised examples about which our intuitions are likely to conflict. DeRose argues that the conflict of intuitions arises from ambiguity in the epistemic ought. I argue that it results from incompleteness. The success of the argument depends on rejecting the narrow conception of evidential support according to which a person’s evidence supports some proposition P only if the person (...)
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  9.  29
    The Inaugural Address: Kantian Modality: Tom Baldwin.Tom Baldwin - 2002 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76 (1):1-24.
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  10.  33
    Thieves of Virtue: When Bioethics Stole Medicine by Tom Koch (Review).Tom L. Beauchamp - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (3):11-14.
    The principal thesis in this book is that bioethics emerged—in the 1960s through the 1980s—under the influence of philosophers who claimed to have universally valid principles that could steer medicine and research to the solution of ethical problems, including even those arising at the bedside of patients. Tom Koch contends that these philosophers and their allied bioethicists “stole medicine” and its traditional values, substituting a philosophical discourse generally inaccessible to the average person. Philosophers thereby refashioned medical ethics in accordance with (...)
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  11.  25
    Wight, Tom 1998 - Paul Us van Tarsus: Een Kennismaking Met Zijn Tbeologie.Tom Wight - 1999 - Hts Theological Studies 55 (4).
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  12. The Right to Privacy and the Right to Die: TOM L. BEAUCHAMP.Tom L. Beauchamp - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):276-292.
    Western ethics and law have been slow to come to conclusions about the right to choose the time and manner of one's death. However, policies, practices, and legal precedents have evolved quickly in the last quarter of the twentieth century, from the forgoing of respirators to the use of Do Not Resuscitate orders, to the forgoing of all medical technologies, and now, in one U.S. state, to legalized physician-assisted suicide. The sweep of history—from the Quinlan case in New Jersey to (...)
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  13.  33
    Interview: Tom Chappell.Tom Chappell & Craig Cox - 1994 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 8 (1):16-18.
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  14.  54
    Tom Stonier's Response.Tom Stonier - 1999 - World Futures 53 (4):375-376.
  15.  81
    Tom Seppalainen, Review of Through the Rearview Mirror: Historical Reflections on Psychology by John Macnamara. [REVIEW]Tom Seppalainen - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):549-551.
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  16. Home: Tom Arndt's Minnesota.Tom Arndt, Garrison Keillor & George Slade - 2009 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
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  17.  49
    The Virtues of Scientific Practice: MacIntyre, Virtue Ethics, and the Historiography of Science.Daniel J. Hicks & Thomas A. Stapleford - 2016 - Isis 107 (3):499-72.
    “Practice” has become a ubiquitous term in the history of science, and yet historians have not always reflected on its philosophical import and especially on its potential connections with ethics. In this essay, we draw on the work of the virtue ethicist Alasdair MacIntyre to develop a theory of “communal practices” and explore how such an approach can inform the history of science, including allegations about the corruption of science by wealth or power; consideration of scientific ethics or “moral economies”; (...)
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  18.  41
    Believing Against the Evidence: Agency and the Ethics of Belief. [REVIEW]Scott Stapleford - 2017 - Philosophical Review 126 (4):551-554.
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  19.  91
    Berkeley’s World: An Examination of the Three Dialogues.Tom Stoneham - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Tom Stoneham offers a clear and detailed study of Berkeley's metaphysics and epistemology, as presented in his classic work Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous, originally published in 1713 and still widely studied. Stoneham shows that Berkeley is an important and systematic philosopher whose work is still of relevance to philosophers today.
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  20.  52
    Intraspecies Impermissivism.Scott Stapleford - 2018 - Episteme 16 (3):340-356.
    The Uniqueness thesis says that any body of evidence E uniquely determines which doxastic attitude is rationally permissible regarding some proposition P. Permissivists deny Uniqueness. They are charged with arbitrarily favouring one doxastic attitude out of the set of attitudes they regard as rationally permissible. Simpson claims that an appeal to differences in cognitive abilities can remove the arbitrariness. I argue that it can't. Impermissivists face a challenge of their own: The problem of fine distinctions. I suggest that meeting this (...)
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  21.  9
    An Interview with Tom Cochrane.Tom Cochrane, Rohan Srivastava & Alexandra Crotty - 2021 - Washington University Review of Philosophy 1:34-40.
  22. Imperfect Epistemic Duties and the Justificational Fecundity of Evidence.Scott Stapleford - 2013 - Synthese 190 (18):4065-4075.
    Mark Nelson argues that we have no positive epistemic duties. His case rests on the evidential inexhaustibility of sensory and propositional evidence—what he calls their ‘infinite justificational fecundity’. It is argued here that Nelson’s reflections on the richness of sensory and propositional evidence do make it doubtful that we ever have an epistemic duty to add any particular beliefs to our belief set, but that they fail to establish that we have no positive epistemic duties whatsoever. A theory of epistemic (...)
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  23.  9
    An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding.Tom L. Beauchamp (ed.) - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    Tom Beauchamp presents a new edition, designed especially for the student reader, of An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, the classic work in which David Hume gave a general exposition of his philosophy to a broad educated readership. An authoritative new version of the text is preceded by a substantial introduction explaining the historical and intellectual background to the work and surveying its main themes. The volume also includes detailed explanatory notes on the text, a glossary of terms, and a section (...)
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  24.  80
    Why There May Be Epistemic Duties.Scott Stapleford - 2015 - Dialogue 54 (1):63-89.
    Chase Wrenn argues that there are no epistemic duties. When it appears that we have an epistemic duty to believe, disbelieve or suspend judgement about some proposition P, we are really under a moral obligation to adopt the attitude towards P that our evidence favours. The argument appeals to theoretical parsimony: our conceptual scheme will be simpler without epistemic duties and we should therefore drop them. I argue that Wrenn’s strategy is flawed. There may well be things that we ought (...)
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  25. Epistemic Duties and Failure to Understand One’s Evidence.Scott Stapleford - 2012 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 16 (1):147-177.
    The paper defends the thesis that our epistemic duty is the duty to proportion our beliefs to the evidence we possess. An inclusive view of evidence possessed is put forward on the grounds that it makes sense of our intuitions about when it is right to say that a person ought to believe some proposition P. A second thesis is that we have no epistemic duty to adopt any particular doxastic attitudes. The apparent tension between the two theses is resolved (...)
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  26.  71
    Epistemic Versus All Things Considered Requirements.Scott Stapleford - 2015 - Synthese 192 (6):1861-1881.
    Epistemic obligations are constraints on belief stemming from epistemic considerations alone. Booth is one of the many philosophers who deny that there are epistemic obligations. Any obligation pertaining to belief is an all things considered obligation, according to him—a strictly generic, rather than specifically epistemic, requirement. Though Booth’s argument is valid, I will try to show that it is unsound. There are two central premises: S is justified in believing that P iff S is blameless in believing that P; S (...)
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  27.  11
    The End of Phenomenology: Metaphysics and the New Realism.Tom Sparrow - 2014 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Tom Sparrow shows how, in the 21st century, speculative realism aims to do what phenomenology could not: provide a philosophical method that disengages the human-centred approach to metaphysics in order to chronicle the complex realm of nonhuman reality. -/- Through a focused reading of the methodological statements and metaphysical commitments of key phenomenologists and speculative realists, Sparrow shows how speculative realism is replacing phenomenology as the beacon of realism in contemporary Continental philosophy.
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  28. Expecting the Unexpected.Tom Dougherty, Sophie Horowitz & Paulina Sliwa - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (2):301-321.
    In an influential paper, L. A. Paul argues that one cannot rationally decide whether to have children. In particular, she argues that such a decision is intractable for standard decision theory. Paul's central argument in this paper rests on the claim that becoming a parent is ``epistemically transformative''---prior to becoming a parent, it is impossible to know what being a parent is like. Paul argues that because parenting is epistemically transformative, one cannot estimate the values of the various outcomes of (...)
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  29.  2
    Kant's Transcendental Arguments: Disciplining Pure Reason.Scott Stapleford - 2008 - London: Bloomsbury.
    Two currents of thought dominated Western philosophy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism. Despite the gradual dissemination of British ideas on the Continent in the first decades of the eighteenth century, these fundamentally disparate philosophical outlooks seemed to be wholly irreconcilable. However, the publication of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason in 1781 presented an entirely new method of philosophical reasoning that promised to combine the virtues of Rationalism with the scientific rigour of Empiricism. This (...)
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  30.  24
    A Spot News Approach to Newsroom Ethics: A Book Review by Tom Bivins. [REVIEW]Tom Bivins - 1995 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (3):185 – 187.
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  31.  53
    A Journalism of Philosophy: A Book Review by Tom Brislin. [REVIEW]Tom Brislin - 1995 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):49 – 51.
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  32.  36
    A Conference Report Worth Reading: A Report Review by Tom Cooper.Tom Cooper - 1995 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (3):188 – 190.
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  33.  23
    The Rights Approach to Mental Illness: Tom Campbell.Tom Campbell - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 18:221-253.
    The concept of rights is now so dominant in the language of politics that it is becoming difficult to identify its use with any particular approach to the solution of social problems or to gain a clear picture of its significance, its advantages and its disadvantages as a way of conceptualizing and resolving contentious political issues. None the less there is a perceptible shift towards an emphasis on rights in contemporary politics which many welcome and encourage and others question and (...)
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  34.  8
    Thieves of Virtue: When Bioethics Stole Medicine.Tom Koch - 2012 - MIT Press.
    Bioethics claimed to offer a set of generally applicable, universally accepted guidelines that would simplify complex situations. In Thieves of Virtue, Tom Koch argues that bioethics has failed to deliver on its promises.
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  35.  35
    Selecting Barrenness - A Response From Tom Shakespeare.Tom Shakespeare - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):22-24.
    A response to Kavita Shah's article Selecting Barrenness.
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  36. Affirmative Consent and Due Diligence.Tom Dougherty - 2018 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 46 (1):90-112.
  37.  40
    The Enactive Approach: Theoretical Sketches From Cell to Society.Tom Froese & Ezequiel A. Di Paolo - 2011 - Pragmatics and Cognition 19 (1):1-36.
    There is a small but growing community of researchers spanning a spectrum of disciplines which are united in rejecting the still dominant computationalist paradigm in favor of theenactive approach. The framework of this approach is centered on a core set of ideas, such as autonomy, sense-making, emergence, embodiment, and experience. These concepts are finding novel applications in a diverse range of areas. One hot topic has been the establishment of an enactive approach to social interaction. The main purpose of this (...)
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  38. Loneliness and the Emotional Experience of Absence.Tom Roberts & Joel Krueger - 2021 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 59 (2):185-204.
    In this paper, we develop an analysis of the structure and content of loneliness. We argue that this is an emotion of absence-an affective state in which certain social goods are regarded as out of reach for the subject of experience. By surveying the range of social goods that appear to be missing from the lonely person's perspective, we see what it is that can make this emotional condition so subjectively awful for those who undergo it, including the profound sense (...)
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  39. The Mental Affordance Hypothesis.Tom McClelland - forthcoming - Mind.
    Our successful engagement with the world is plausibly underwritten by our sensitivity to affordances in our immediate environment. The considerable literature on affordances focuses almost exclusively on affordances for bodily actions such as gripping, walking or eating. I propose that we are also sensitive to affordances for mental actions such as attending, imagining and counting. My case for this ‘Mental Affordance Hypothesis’ is motivated by a series of examples in which our sensitivity to mental affordances mirrors our sensitivity to bodily (...)
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  40. Sociality and the Life–Mind Continuity Thesis.Tom Froese & Ezequiel A. Di Paolo - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):439-463.
    The life–mind continuity thesis holds that mind is prefigured in life and that mind belongs to life. The biggest challenge faced by proponents of this thesis is to show how an explanatory framework that accounts for basic biological processes can be systematically extended to incorporate the highest reaches of human cognition. We suggest that this apparent ‘cognitive gap’ between minimal and human forms of life appears insurmountable largely because of the methodological individualism that is prevalent in cognitive science. Accordingly, a (...)
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  41.  20
    Critical Thinking, Rhetoric, Ideology: Excerpts From an Interview with Tom Bridges.Tom Bridges & Robert Esformes - 1990 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 5 (3):7-8.
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  42.  83
    A Breath of Fresh Air: Absence and the Structure of Olfactory Perception.Tom Roberts - 2016 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):400-420.
    The question of whether we can perceive absences, in addition to ‘positives’, has received recent attention in the literature on the nature of vision and audition. The aim is to demonstrate that there can be objectless forms of perceptual consciousness; specifically, to show that such episodes can be distinguished from those in which there is merely no perception at all. The current article explores this question for the domain of olfaction, and argues that there can be experiences of the absence (...)
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  43.  77
    Book Review:The Fatal Conceit: The Errors of Socialism. F. A. Hayek.Tom G. Palmer - 1990 - Ethics 101 (1):192-193.
  44.  34
    The Emotional Mind : A Control Theory of Affective States.Tom Cochrane - 2018 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Tom Cochrane develops a new control theory of the emotions and related affective states. Grounded in the basic principle of negative feedback control, his original account outlines a new fundamental kind of mental content called 'valent representation'. Upon this foundation, Cochrane constructs new models for emotions, pains and pleasures, moods, expressive behaviours, evaluative reasoning, personality traits and long-term character commitments. These various states are presented as increasingly sophisticated layers of regulative control, which together underpin the architecture of (...)
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  45.  73
    Who Do We Treat First When Resources Are Scarce?Tom Walker - 2010 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):200-211.
    In a health service with limited resources we must make decisions about who to treat first. In this paper I develop a version of the restoration argument according to which those whose need for resources is a consequence of their voluntary choices should receive lower priority when it comes to health care. I then consider three possible problems for this argument based on those that have been raised against other theories of this type: that we don't know in a particular (...)
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  46.  22
    Adam Smith's Science of Morals.Tom Campbell - 1971 - London: Allen & Unwin.
  47. Expression and Extended Cognition.Tom Cochrane - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):59-73.
    I argue for the possibility of an extremely intimate connection between the emotional content of the music and the emotional state of the person who produces that music. Under certain specified conditions, the music may not just influence, but also partially constitute the musician’s emotional state.
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  48.  98
    Kant and Phenomenology.Tom Rockmore - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    From Platonism to phenomenology -- Kant's epistemological shift to phenomenology -- Hegel's phenomenology as epistemology -- Husserl's phenomenological epistemology -- Heidegger's phenomenological ontology -- Kant, Merleau-Ponty's descriptive phenomenology, and the primacy of perception -- On overcoming the epistemological problem through phenomenology.
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  49. Why Do Female Students Leave Philosophy? The Story From Sydney.Tom Dougherty, Samuel Baron & Kristie Miller - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (2):467-474.
    The anglophone philosophy profession has a well-known problem with gender equity. A sig-nificant aspect of the problem is the fact that there are simply so many more male philoso-phers than female philosophers among students and faculty alike. The problem is at its stark-est at the faculty level, where only 22% - 24% of philosophers are female in the United States (Van Camp 2014), the United Kingdom (Beebee & Saul 2011) and Australia (Goddard 2008).<1> While this is a result of the (...)
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  50. Rights: A Critical Introduction.Tom Campbell - 2006 - Routledge.
    We take rights to be fundamental to everyday life. Rights are also controversial and hotly debated both in theory and practice. Where do rights come from? Are they invented or discovered? What sort of rights are there and who is entitled to them? In this comprehensive introduction, Tom Campbell introduces and critically examines the key philosophical debates about rights. The first part of the book covers historical and contemporary theories of rights, including the origin and variety of rights and standard (...)
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