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  1. Job and the Problem of Evil: Some Thoughts.Richard Oxenberg -
    Is it reasonable to believe in a God of love in the face of life's many evils? In this essay I consider how the biblical book of Job raises and responds to this question.
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  2. Formal Theodicy: Religious Determinism and the Logical Problem of Evil.Gesiel B. Da Silva & Fábio Bertato - 2020 - Edukacja Filozoficzna 70:93-119.
    Edward Nieznański developed two logical systems to deal with the problem of evil and to refute religious determinism. However, when formalized in first-order modal logic, two axioms of each system contradict one another, revealing that there is an underlying minimal set of axioms enough to settle the questions. In this article, we develop this minimal system, called N3, which is based on Nieznański’s contribution. The purpose of N3 is to solve the logical problem of evil through the defeat of a (...)
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  3. An Axiomatic Approach to Theodicy Via Formal Applied Systems.Gesiel B. Da Silva - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Campinas
    Edward Nieznański developed two logical systems in order to deal with a version of the problem of evil associated with two formulations of religious determinism. The aim of this research was to revisit these systems, providing them with a more appropriate formalization. The new resulting systems, namely, N1 and N2, were reformulated in first-order modal logic; they retain much of their original basic structures, but some additional results were obtained. Furthermore, our research found that an underlying minimal set of axioms (...)
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  4. Maitzen’s Objection From God’s Goodness.Philipp Kremers - forthcoming - Sophia:1-18.
    Stephen Maitzen argues that divine command metaethics must be mistaken because it is committed to the implausible assumption that the sentence ‘God is (morally) good’ is a tautology. In this article, I show that a charitable interpretation of R. M. Adams’ version of divine command metaethics is not committed to accept this assumption. I conclude that Maitzen’s objection merely manages to refute a strawman version of divine command metaethics.
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  5. The Standard Interpretation of Schopenhauer’s Compensation Argument for Pessimism: A Nonstandard Variant.David Bather Woods - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    According to Schopenhauer’s compensation argument for pessimism, the non-existence of the world is preferable to its existence because no goods can ever compensate for the mere existence of evil. Standard interpretations take this argument to be based on Schopenhauer’s thesis that all goods are merely the negation of evils, from which they assume it follows that the apparent goods in life are in fact empty and without value. This article develops a non-standard variant of the standard interpretation, which accepts the (...)
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  6. Is the Universe Indifferent? Should We Care.Guy Kahane - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, EarlyView.
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  7. Traditional Kitsch and the Janus-Head of Comfort.C. E. Emmer - 2014 - In Justyna Stępień (ed.), Redefining Kitsch and Camp in Literature and Culture. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 23-38.
    "C.E. Emmer’s article addresses the ongoing debates over how to classify and understand kitsch, from the inception of postmodern culture onwards. It is suggested that the lack of clear distinction between fine art and popular culture generates 'approaches to kitsch – what we might call 'deflationary' approaches – that conspire to create the impression that, ultimately, either 'kitsch' should be abandoned as a concept altogether, or we should simply abandon ourselves to enjoying kitschy objects as kitsch.' The author offers critical (...)
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  8. Decentering Europe in the Thinking of Evil.Imge Oranli - 2021 - Philosophy World Democracy.
    This essay suggests that Continental Studies of Evil need a more global approach in thinking about political evils of today. Highlighting the need for a more comparative and global perspective, I explore two proposals: first, the in-between space of the geographical binaries of East/West and Global South/Global North cultivates many political evils. Second, taking issue with the conviction in Continental philosophy that the Holocaust caused a rupture in the thinking of evil, I argue for the continuity of evils and characterize (...)
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  9. Progress on the Problem of Evil.Seyyed Mohsen Eslami & Dan Egonsson - 2021 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 29 (2):221-235.
    A standard reaction to the problem of evil is to look for a greater good that can explain why God (with the traditional attributes) might have created this world instead of a seemingly better one which has no (or less) evil. This paper proposes an approach we call the Moral Progress Approach: Given the value of progress, a non-perfect world containing evil may be preferable to a perfect world without evil. This makes room for the possibility that this world, with (...)
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  10. Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform by Laura Papish. [REVIEW]Janelle DeWitt - 2020 - Philosophical Review 129 (4):651-656.
    Review of: Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform, by PapishLaura. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. xvii + 257.
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  11. God* Does Not Exist: A Novel Logical Problem of Evil.P. X. Monaghan - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (2):181-195.
    I often tell my students that the only thing that is not controversial in philosophy is that everything else in it is controversial. While this might be a bit of an exaggeration, it does contain a kernel of truth, as many exaggerations do: philosophy is a highly contentious discipline. So it is remarkable the extent to which there is agreement in the philosophy of religion amongst theists, agnostics, and atheists alike that John Mackie’s argument for atheism is either invalid or (...)
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  12. Problems with Compensation: Gleeson on Marilyn McCord Adams on Evil.Joshua C. Thurow - 2020 - Sophia 59 (3):513-524.
    According to the most recent articulation of her view, Marilyn Adams’s reply to the problem of horrendous evils states that God offers compensation to those who experience horrendous evils. This compensation includes the good of the incarnation of God and the good of identification with God in virtue of suffering horrendous evils. Andrew Gleeson has raised a series of objections to Adams’s recent articulation. I argue that all of Gleeson’s arguments fail or fail to pose a distinct challenge. I then (...)
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  13. A Zhuangzian Critique of John Hick’s Theodicy.Leo K. C. Cheung - 2020 - Sophia 59 (3):549-562.
    Hick’s soul-making theodicy defends the omnipotence, omniscience, and all-goodness of God in the face of evil. It holds that the end of the creation process is the development of human beings into children of God. In order to achieve the end, an evil-dependent soul-making process must be employed. It then concludes that, because the end is so valuable, the omnipotent and omniscient creator’s not having prevented the existence of evil is morally justified and thus not in conflict with her being (...)
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  14. Where Human and Divine Intimacy Meet: An Insight Into the Theodicy of Marilyn McCord Adams.Ionut Untea - 2020 - Sophia 59 (3):525-547.
    Marilyn McCord Adams’s perspective on the intimacy with God as a way of defeating horrendous evils in the course of a human being’s existence has been met with a series of objections in contemporary scholarship. This is due to the fact that the critiques formulated have focused more on the debilitating impact of suffering on the sufferer’s body and mind, on intimacy as mere intermittent relationships between God and humans, or on what is lost or gained from the presence or (...)
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  15. Notes on the Spiritual Path.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    In this paper I present, in summary form, some of my central thoughts about spirituality and religion.
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  16. Soul-Making and Social Progress.Michael Hemmingsen - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):81-96.
    I argue that John Hick’s soul-making theodicy is committed to opposing social progress. By focusing on justifying the current amount and distribution of suffering and evil, Hick’s theodicy ends up having to condemn even positive change as undesirable. First, I give a brief outline of Hick’s theodicy, with a particular emphasis on the role of earned virtue in justifying the existence of evil. Then I consider two understandings of social progress: progress as the elimination of suffering and evil; and progress (...)
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  17. God hidden from God: on theodicy, dereliction, and human suffering.William L. Bell - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):41-55.
    A number of theologians and philosophers have found theodical value in the theme of divine solidarity with human suffering. To further develop this theme, I examine what it would mean to assert that Christ on the cross participated in a representative sample of human suffering. Particular attention is paid to Christ’s cry of dereliction. I argue that if God through Christ identified with the very worst kinds of human suffering on the cross, then the cry of dereliction should be interpreted (...)
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  18. Classical theism and the multiverse.Katherin A. Rogers - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):23-39.
    Some analytic philosophers of religion argue that theists should embrace the hypothesis of the multiverse to address the problem of evil and make the concept of a “best possible creation” plausible. I discuss what classical theists, such as Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas, might make of the multiverse hypothesis including issues such as: the principle of plenitude, what a classical theist multiverse could look like, and how a classical theist multiverse could deal with the problem of evil and the question of (...)
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  19. Images of natural evil.Ronald L. Hall - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (3):213-216.
  20. Who’s Right About Rights?William Hasker - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (3):209-212.
    My comment on Jim Sterba’s bookFootnote1 will consist in a critique of what I take to be the central argument of the book, an argument that a certain kind of evil that is prevalent in our world is logically inconsistent with the existence of a good God. For our purposes here, the argument can be summarized briefly; if my objection as given here succeeds, the entire argument will fail to establish its conclusion. It begins with a statement of an alleged (...)
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  21. Replies.James P. Sterba - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (3):223-228.
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  22. Analyzing Sterba’s Argument.Michael Tooley - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (3):217-222.
  23. Introduction to the symposium.Michael S. Jones - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (3):201-202.
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  24. The Lucifer Effect. Understanding How Good People Turn Evil by Philip Zimbardo.Agnieszka Salamucha - 2009 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 14 (1):166-168.
  25. Marek K. Siwiec, Los, Zło, Tajemnica: Ku Twórczym Źródlom Poezji Aleksandra Wata I Czeslawa Milosza [Fate, Evil, Mystery. Toward the Creative Sources of Aleksander Wat's and Czeslaw Milosz's Poetry] by Władysław Stróżewski.Anna Julia Siwiec & Władysław Stróżewski - 2007 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 12 (2):455-458.
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  26. Giving the Devil His Due: Demonic Authority in the Fiction of Flannery O’Connor and Fyodor Dostoevsky. By Jessica Hooten Wilson. Pp. X, 146, Eugene, OR, Cascade Books, 2017, $21.00. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):582-582.
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  27. Anti-Theism, Pro-Theism, and Gratuitous Evil.Kirk Lougheed - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):355-369.
    Ebrahim Azadegan recently argues that personal anti-theism, the view that it’s rational for a particular individual to prefer that God not exist, is a form of gratuitous evil. He justifies this evil by arguing that the anti-theist is uniquely positioned to bargain, implore, and plea to God. I argue that Azadegan faces a paradox. Once the anti-theist recognizes that God plus anti-theism makes the world better, she should convert to pro-theism. But then there can be no reflective anti-theists who could (...)
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  28. An Axiological-Trajectory Theodicy.Thomas Metcalf - 2020 - Sophia 59 (3):577-592.
    I develop a new theodicy in defense of Anselmian theism, one that has several advantages over traditional and recent replies to the Problem of Evil. To make my case, I first explain the value of a positive trajectory: a forward-in-time decrease in ‘first-order-gratuitous’ evil: evil that is not necessary for any equal-or-greater first-order good, but may be necessary for a higher-order good, such as the good of strongly positive axiological trajectory. Positive trajectory arguably contributes goodness to a world in proportion (...)
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  29. What If God Commanded Something Horrible? A Pragmatics-Based Defence of Divine Command Metaethics.Philipp Kremers - 2021 - Religious Studies 57 (4):597–617.
    The objection of horrible commands claims that divine command metaethics is doomed to failure because it is committed to the extremely counterintuitive assumption that torture of innocents, rape, and murder would be morally obligatory if God commanded these acts. Morriston, Wielenberg, and Sinnott-Armstrong have argued that formulating this objection in terms of counterpossibles is particularly forceful because it cannot be simply evaded by insisting on God’s necessary perfect moral goodness. I show that divine command metaethics can be defended even against (...)
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  30. Thomas Aquinas and the Euthyphro Dilemma.Peter Karl Koritansky - 2018 - Heythrop Journal 62 (6):1013-1024.
  31. Climate Engineering From Hindu‐Jain Perspectives.Pankaj Jain - 2019 - Zygon 54 (4):826-836.
    Although Indic perspectives toward nature are now well documented, climate engineering discussions seem to still lack the views from Indic or other non‐Western sources. In this article, I will apply some of the Hindu and Jain concepts such as karma, nonviolence (Ahiṃsā ), humility (Vinaya ), and renunciation (Saṃnyāsa ) to analyze the two primary climate geoengineering strategies of solar radiation management (SRM) and carbon dioxide removal (CDR). I suggest that Indic philosophical and religious traditions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and (...)
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  32. The Root of All Evil.James Higgins - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (6):856-870.
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  33. Descartes' Demon--More Powerful and Just Than God?Joshua M. Hall - 2015 - In Benjamin McCraw & Rob Arp (eds.), Philosophical Approaches to the Devil. New York, NY, USA: pp. 106-118.
    The demon is, in the thinker,s words, "supremely powerful and clever", and it is only the combination of these two traits with the demon's incessant deception that empowers Descartes to stage the radical doubt that will terminate in his attempted proofs of God and the material world. The reason the demon is necessary is that the thinker cannot prove that it would be wrong for God to allow us to be deceived occasionally. Thus, Descartes needed, methodologically and rhetorically, something more (...)
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  34. The Fall of Satan, Rational Psychology, and the Division of Consciousness.Thomas Ryba - 2018 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 23 (2):301-337.
    This paper proposes a revision of Girard’s interpretation of Satan, along traditional theological lines. Appreciating the essential correctness of the Girardian characterization of mimēsis, it is an argument, contra Girard, that Satan cannot be reduced to a mimetic process but is a hypostatic spiritual reality and, following from this, that the origins of mimetic rivalry go back before the emergence of humankind and provide a model for human rivalry. Employing concepts drawn from Husserlian phenomenological psychology, Thomist theology, and psychoanalysis, it (...)
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  35. Philosophy and Religion, Hope and Rapture.Christopher Hamilton - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (3):115-134.
    I argue that religion knows rapture and philosophy doesn't.
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  36. Michael W. Austin Humility and Human Flourishing: A Study in Analytic Moral Theology. . Pp. 246. £65.00 . ISBN 9780198830221. [REVIEW]T. Ryan Byerly - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-5.
  37. The Mystery of Evil: Benedict XVI and the End of Days. By Giorgio Agamben; Translated by Adam Kostko. Pp. Xi, 69, Stanford CA: Stanford University Press, 2017, £12.99. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (5):813-814.
  38. The Prince of This World. By Adam Kotsko. Pp. Xii, 226, Stanford, CA, Stanford University Press, 2017, £18.99.Luke Penkett - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (5):815-815.
  39. Evil in the Fine‐Tuned World.Ebrahim Azadegan - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (5):795-804.
  40. A Thomistic Answer to the Evil‐God Challenge.B. Kyle Keltz - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (5):689-698.
    Stephen Law’s evil-god challenge is the argument that since an evil god is just as likely as the God of theism, there is no reason to believe that theism is true over believing there is a god who is omnipotent, omniscient, and omnimalevolent. There have been several attempts to answer the challenge, but recently John Collins has defended the evil-god challenge and also extended the argument past Law’s original formulation. In this article, I defend the classical theism of Thomas Aquinas (...)
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  41. Hoping in the Face of Evil: A Theological Account.Paul A. Macdonald - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (5):783-794.
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  42. God and Evil in the Theology of St Thomas Aquinas. By Herbert McCabe. Edited and Introduced by Brian Davies. Pp. Xviii, 205, London/NY, Continuum, 2010, £19.99. [REVIEW]Douglas McDermid - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (5):814-815.
  43. What Does Pope Francis Mean by His References to the Devil as a Being? An Intratextual, Cultural‐Linguistic Perspective.Alan McGill - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (5):769-782.
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  44. Resistance: Its Nature, Virtues, and Application to Matters of Faith.Nicholas Michael Colgrove - 2019 - Dissertation, Baylor University
    There are many cries to resist particular objects (e.g. inequality in the workplace) but very little is said concerning the nature of resistance. As such, this project begins by mapping the concept of resistance. Next, I develop several tools that allow us to distinguish between reasonable and unreasonable instances of resistance. I then argue that many versions of “the problem of evil” are actually instances of resistance. As such, these versions of the problem of evil are subject to the tools (...)
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  45. The Ego and the Spirit, Chapter 1.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    This is the first chapter of a projected book to be entitled, The Ego and the Spirit. This book will endeavor to examine what lies at the heart of human spiritual aspiration from a psychological, philosophical, and religious perspective. In this first chapter, I discuss the predicament of the human ego, charged with a task that it cannot fulfill: To establish itself securely within being. The ego's efforts to fulfill this task through its dealings with the things and people of (...)
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  46. Temor y temblor. Los simbolismos del miedo en la cultura pentecostal chilena.Miguel Ángel Mansilla, Wilson Muñoz & Carlos Piñones Rivera - 2018 - 'Ilu. Revista de Ciencias de Las Religiones 23:175-190.
    The aim of this article is to analyse the semantics that has acquired the fear’s symbolism in the culture of Chilean Pentecostalism. By means of the revision and analysis of bibliographic information, we will show how the figure of fear is revealed in the images of hell, the Devil and God. Then we will provide an interpretation of the symbolic peculiarity of fear, which seems to operate as a kind of master symbol of Pentecostalism, not only because it is one (...)
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  47. Sin in the Sixties: Catholics and Confession 1955‐1975, By Maria C. Morrow. Pp. Xvii, 284. Washington, D.C., The Catholic University of America Press, 2016. £68.95. [REVIEW]James Campbell - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (4):647-648.
  48. The Jinn and the Shayatin.Edward Moad - 2017 - In Benjamin McCraw & Robert Arp (eds.), Philosophical Approaches to Demonology. New York, NY, USA: pp. 137-155.
    If by “demon” one understands an evil occult being, then its equivalent in the Islamic narrative is the intersection of the category jinn with that of the shayātīn: a demon is a shaytān from among the jinn. The literature in the Islamic tradition on these subjects is vast. In what follows, we will select some key elements from it to provide a brief summary: first on the nature of the jinn, their nature, and their relationship to God and human beings; (...)
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  49. Exorzismen in der jüdischen Tradition.Salcia Landmann - 1976 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 28 (4):357-366.
  50. Carl-Martin Edsman: Die Haupreligionen des Heutigen Asiens. J. C. B. Mohr (Paul Siebeck.) ÜTB 448, Tübingen 1976, 214 Pp. [REVIEW]Udo Tworuschka - 1976 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 28 (3):279-280.
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