Results for 'Katherine A. Green Hammond'

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  1.  16
    Shaping Medical Students' Attitudes Toward Ethically Important Aspects of Clinical Research: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Educational Intervention.Laura Weiss Roberts, Teddy D. Warner, Laura B. Dunn, Janet L. Brody, Katherine A. Green Hammond & Brian B. Roberts - 2007 - Ethics and Behavior 17 (1):19-50.
    The effects of research ethics training on medical students' attitudes about clinical research are examined. A preliminary randomized controlled trial evaluated 2 didactic approaches to ethics training compared to a no-intervention control. The participant-oriented intervention emphasized subjective experiences of research participants. The criteria-oriented intervention emphasized specific ethical criteria for analyzing protocols. Compared to controls, those in the participant-oriented intervention group exhibited greater attunement to research participants' attitudes related to altruism, trust, quality of relationships with researchers, desire for information, hopes about (...)
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  2.  29
    Coexisting Commitments to Ethics and Human Research: A Preliminary Study of the Perspectives of 83 Medical Students.Laura Weiss Roberts, Teddy D. Warner & Katherine A. Green Hammond - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (6):W1-W7.
  3.  24
    Shaping Medical Students' Attitudes Toward Ethically Important Aspects of Clinical Research: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Educational Intervention.Laura Weiss Roberts, Teddy D. Warner, Laura B. Dunn, Janet L. Brody, Katherine Green Hammond & Brian B. Roberts - 2007 - Ethics and Behavior 17 (1):19 – 50.
    The effects of research ethics training on medical students' attitudes about clinical research are examined. A preliminary randomized controlled trial evaluated 2 didactic approaches to ethics training compared to a no-intervention control. The participant-oriented intervention emphasized subjective experiences of research participants (empathy focused). The criteria-oriented intervention emphasized specific ethical criteria for analyzing protocols (analytic focused). Compared to controls, those in the participant-oriented intervention group exhibited greater attunement to research participants' attitudes related to altruism, trust, quality of relationships with researchers, desire (...)
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  4.  4
    Does My Professor Think My Ability Can Change? Students’ Perceptions of Their STEM Professors’ Mindset Beliefs Predict Their Psychological Vulnerability, Engagement, and Performance in Class.Katherine Muenks, Elizabeth A. Canning, Jennifer LaCosse, Dorainne J. Green, Sabrina Zirkel, Julie A. Garcia & Mary C. Murphy - 2020 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 149 (11):2119-2144.
  5.  6
    A Bibliography of Aesthetics and of the Philosophy of the Fine Arts From 1900 to 1932. Compiled and Edited by William A. Hammond, Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus, in Cornell University. Revised and Enlarged Edition. (New York: Longmans, Green & Co. 1934. Pp. X + 205.). [REVIEW] Listowel - 1934 - Philosophy 9 (36):497-.
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  6. Western Philosophy.Malcolm Seymour, Trevor Green, Audrey Healy, J. D. G. Evans, Richard Cross, James Ladyman, Katherine J. Morris, W. J. Mander, Christine Battersby, A. W. Moore, Robert Stern, Christopher Hookway, Bob Carruthers, Gary Russell, Dennis Hedlund, Alex Ridgway, Alexander Fyfe, Paul Farrer & Trevor Nichols (eds.) - 2006 - Kultur.
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  7.  9
    A Plea for Philosophers' Direct Participation in the Policy Formation Process.Kenneth R. Hammond - 1981 - Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 3:76-86.
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  8. Why Temporary Properties Are Not Relations Be- Tween Physical Objects and Times.Katherine Hawley - 1998 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98 (2):211–216.
    Take this banana. It is now yellow, and when I bought it yesterday it was green. How can a single object be both green all over and yellow all over without contradiction? It is, of course, the passage of time which dissolves the contradiction, but how is this possible? How can a banana ripen? These questions raise the problem of change. The problem is sometimes called the problem of temporary intrinsics, but, as I shall explain below, this emphasis (...)
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  9. The Companionship of Books: Essays in Honor of Laurence Berns.John E. Alvis, George Anastaplo, Paul A. Cantor, Jerrold R. Caplan, Michael Davis, Robert Goldberg, Kenneth Hart Green, Harry V. Jaffa, Antonio Marino-López, Joshua Parens, Sharon Portnoff, Robert D. Sacks, Owen J. Sadlier & Martin D. Yaffe (eds.) - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    This volume is a collection of essays by various contributors in honor of the late Laurence Berns, Richard Hammond Elliot Tutor Emeritus at St. John's College, Annapolis. The essays address the literary, political, theological, and philosophical themes of his life's work as a scholar, teacher, and constant companion of the "great books.".
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  10.  27
    Eternity has No Duration: Katherin A. Rogers.Katherin A. Rogers - 1994 - Religious Studies 30 (1):1-16.
    In 1981 Eleonore Stump and Norman Kretzmann published a landmark article aimed at exploring the classical concept of divine eternity. 1 Taking Boethius as the primary spokesman for the traditional view, they analyse God's eternity as timeless yet as possessing duration. More recently Brian Leftow has seconded Stump and Kretzmann's interpretation of the medieval position and attempted to defend the notion of a durational eternity as a useful way of expressing the sort of life God leads. 2 However, there are (...)
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  11.  3
    Virtue, Liberty, and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women, 1400-1800.Jacqueline Broad & Karen Green (eds.) - 2007 - Springer.
    This volume challenges the view that women have not contributed to the historical development of political ideas, and highlights the depth and complexity of women’s political thought in the centuries prior to the French Revolution. -/- From the late medieval period to the enlightenment, a significant number of European women wrote works dealing with themes of political significance. The essays in this collection examine their writings with particular reference to the ideas of virtue, liberty, and toleration. The figures discussed include (...)
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  12.  72
    The Development of Perceptual Grouping Biases in Infancy: A Japanese-English Cross-Linguistic Study.Katherine A. Yoshida, John R. Iversen, Aniruddh D. Patel, Reiko Mazuka, Hiromi Nito, Judit Gervain & Janet F. Werker - 2010 - Cognition 115 (2):356-361.
    Perceptual grouping has traditionally been thought to be governed by innate, universal principles. However, recent work has found differences in Japanese and English speakers' non-linguistic perceptual grouping, implicating language in non-linguistic perceptual processes (Iversen, Patel, & Ohgushi, 2008). Two experiments test Japanese- and English-learning infants of 5-6 and 7-8 months of age to explore the development of grouping preferences. At 5-6 months, neither the Japanese nor the English infants revealed any systematic perceptual biases. However, by 7-8 months, the same age (...)
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  13.  11
    “Modern” Farming and the Transformation of Livelihoods in Rural Tanzania.Katherine A. Snyder, Emmanuel Sulle, Deodatus A. Massay, Anselmi Petro, Paschal Qamara & Dan Brockington - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):33-46.
    This paper focuses on smallholder agriculture and livelihoods in north-central Tanzania. It traces changes in agricultural production and asset ownership in one community over a 28 year period. Over this period, national development policies and agriculture programs have moved from socialism to neo-liberal approaches. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, we explore how farmers have responded to these shifts in the wider political-economic context and how these responses have shaped their livelihoods and ideas about farming and wealth. This (...)
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  14.  9
    Freedom and Self Creation: Anselmian Libertarianism.Katherin A. Rogers - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Katherin A. Rogers presents a new theory of free will, based on the thought of Anselm of Canterbury. We did not originally produce ourselves. Yet, according to Anselm, we can engage in self-creation, freely and responsibly forming our characters by choosing 'from ourselves' between open options. Anselm introduces a new, agent-causal libertarianism which is parsimonious in that, unlike other agent-causal theories, it does not appeal to any unique and mysterious powers to explain how the free agent chooses. After setting out (...)
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  15.  10
    Postpartum Maternal Tethering: A Bioethics of Early Motherhood.Katherine A. Mason - 2021 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 14 (1):49-72.
    We must reconceive the ethical relationship between mothers and their newborn babies. The intertwinement of mother and baby does not disappear with birth but rather persists in the form of postpartum maternal tethering. Drawing upon three years of ethnographic fieldwork and training in the United States and China, I argue that dependencies associated with postpartum maternal tethering make it extremely difficult for postpartum mothers to act autonomously, even in the relational sense. Breaching this tether opens up new possibilities for thinking (...)
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  16. Anselmian Eternalism: The Presence of a Timeless God.Katherin A. Rogers - 2007 - Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):3-27.
    Anselm holds that God is timeless, time is tenseless, and humans have libertarian freedom. This combination of commitments is largely undefended incontemporary philosophy of religion. Here I explain Anselmian eternalism with its entailment of tenseless time, offer reasons for accepting it, and defend it against criticisms from William Hasker and other Open Theists. I argue that the tenseless view is coherent, that God’s eternal omniscience is consistent with libertarian freedom, that being eternal greatly enhances divine sovereignty, and that the Anselmian (...)
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  17. Anselmian Eternalism: The Presence of a Timeless God.Katherin A. Rogers - 2007 - Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):3-27.
    Anselm holds that God is timeless, time is tenseless, and humans have libertarian freedom. This combination of commitments is largely undefended incontemporary philosophy of religion. Here I explain Anselmian eternalism with its entailment of tenseless time, offer reasons for accepting it, and defend it against criticisms from William Hasker and other Open Theists. I argue that the tenseless view is coherent, that God’s eternal omniscience is consistent with libertarian freedom, that being eternal greatly enhances divine sovereignty, and that the Anselmian (...)
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  18.  38
    The Population History of England, 1541-1871. A Reconstruction.Katherine A. Lynch, E. A. Wrigley, R. S. Schofield, Ronald Lee & Jim Oeppen - 1983 - History and Theory 22 (1):93.
  19. Which Symmetry? Noether, Weyl, and Conservation of Electric Charge.Katherine A. Brading - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (1):3-22.
  20.  8
    Classic Texts: Extracts From Leibniz, Kant, and Black.Katherine A. Brading & Elena Castellani - 2003 - In Katherine A. Brading & Elena Castellani (eds.), Symmetries in Physics: Philosophical Reflections. Cambridge University Press. pp. 203.
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  21.  41
    The Abolition of Sin: A Response to Adams in the Augustinian Tradition.Katherin A. Rogers - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):69-84.
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  22.  13
    Which Symmetry? Noether, Weyl, and Conservation of Electric Charge.Katherine A. Brading - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (1):3-22.
  23.  10
    The Experimental Approach to Free Will: Freedom in the Laboratory.Katherin A. Rogers - 2022 - Routledge.
    Rogers canvases the literature critical of recent experiments, adding new criticisms of her own. She argues these experiments should not undermine belief in human freedom and lists ethical and practical problems facing the attempt to study free will experimentally.
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  24.  3
    When the Ghosts Live in the Nursery: Postpartum Depression and the Grandmother‐Mother‐Baby Triad in Luzhou, China.Katherine A. Mason - 2020 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 48 (2):149-170.
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  25.  9
    A Nursing Theory-Guided Framework for Genetic and Epigenetic Research.Katherine A. Maki & Holli A. DeVon - 2018 - Nursing Inquiry 25 (3):e12238.
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  26.  76
    Classical theism and the multiverse.Katherin A. Rogers - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):23-39.
    Some analytic philosophers of religion argue that theists should embrace the hypothesis of the multiverse to address the problem of evil and make the concept of a “best possible creation” plausible. I discuss what classical theists, such as Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas, might make of the multiverse hypothesis including issues such as: the principle of plenitude, what a classical theist multiverse could look like, and how a classical theist multiverse could deal with the problem of evil and the question of (...)
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  27.  22
    Researcher Views About Funding Sources and Conflicts of Interest in Nanotechnology.Katherine A. McComas - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (4):699-717.
    Dependence in nanotechnology on external funding and academic-industry relationships has led to questions concerning its influence on research directions, as well as the potential for conflicts of interest to arise and impact scientific integrity and public trust. This study uses a survey of 193 nanotechnology industry and academic researchers to explore whether they share similar concerns. Although these concerns are not unique to nanotechnology, its emerging nature and the prominence of industry funding lend credence to understanding its researchers’ views, as (...)
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  28.  9
    Andrea A. Rusnock. Vital Accounts: Quantifying Health and Population in Eighteenth‐Century England and France. Xiv + 249 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. £45. [REVIEW]Katherine A. Lynch - 2005 - Isis 96 (1):116-117.
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  29.  23
    An Anselmian Approach to Divine Simplicity.Katherin A. Rogers - 2020 - Faith and Philosophy 37 (3):308-322.
    The doctrine of divine simplicity is an important aspect of the classical theism of philosophers like Augustine, Anselm, and Thomas Aquinas. Recently the doctrine has been defended in a Thomist mode using the intrinsic/extrinsic distinction. I argue that this approach entails problems which can be avoided by taking Anselm’s more Neoplatonic line. This does involve accepting some controversial claims: for example, that time is isotemporal and that God inevitably does the best. The most difficult problem involves trying to reconcile created (...)
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  30.  20
    We Created Chávez: A People’s History of the Venezuelan Revolution.Katherine A. Gordy - 2015 - Contemporary Political Theory 14 (2):e208-e211.
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  31.  52
    Does a Green Leaf Confirm That All Ravens Are Black? Brief Reflections on a Paradox of Confirmation 1: Miles Does a Green Leaf Confirm That All Ravens Are Black?Tim Miles - 2014 - Think 13 (36):89-92.
    The paradox is that a natural idea of what counts as confirmation implies that a green leaf confirms the hypothesis that all ravens are black. The following brief paper explains this paradox, proposes a resolution in terms of relative frequency, and suggests that this shows a link between confirmation and falsification.
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  32. The Necessity of the Present and Anselm's Eternalist Response to the Problem of Theological Fatalism.Katherin A. Rogers - 2007 - Religious Studies 43 (1):25-47.
    It is often argued that the eternalist solution to the freedom/foreknowledge dilemma fails. If God's knowledge of your choices is eternally fixed, your choices are necessary and cannot be free. Anselm of Canterbury proposes an eternalist view which entails that all of time is equally real and truly present to God. God's knowledge of your choices entails only a ‘consequent’ necessity which does not conflict with libertarian freedom. I argue this by showing that if consequent necessity does conflict with libertarian (...)
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  33.  28
    Arrian. I. Anabasis Alexandri. Books I–Iv. Ed. And Trans. Brunt. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Univ. Press and London: Heinemann. 1976. Pp. Lxxxvi + 547, 1 Folding Map. £5.00. - Arrian. A Historical Commentary on Arrian's History of Alexander. By Bosworth. 1. Commentary on Books I–Iii. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 1980. Pp. Xv + 396. £30.00. - Hammond Alexander the Great: King, Commander and Statesman. London: Chatto and Windus. 1981. Pp. X + 358, 44 Illus. , Map on End Papers.£14.95. [REVIEW]A. R. Burn, Arrian, P. A. Brunt, A. B. Bosworth & N. G. L. Hammond - 1983 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 103:206-208.
  34.  48
    The Incarnation As Action Composite.Katherin A. Rogers - 2013 - Faith and Philosophy 30 (3):251-270.
    The Council of Chalcedon insisted that God Incarnate is one person with two natures, one divine and one human. Recently critics have rightly argued that God Incarnate cannot be a composite person. In the present paper I defend a new composite theory using the analogy of a boy playing a video game. The analogy suggests that the Incarnation is God doing something. The Incarnation is what I label an “action composite” and is a state of affairs, constituted by one divine (...)
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  35.  48
    A Defense of Anselm’s Cur Deus Homo Argument.Katherin A. Rogers - 2000 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:187-200.
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  36.  79
    Evidence for God From Certainty.Katherin A. Rogers - 2008 - Faith and Philosophy 25 (1):31-46.
    Human beings can have “strongly certain” beliefs—indubitable, veridical beliefs with a unique phenomenology—about necessarily true propositions like 2+2=4. On the plausible assumption that mathematical entities are platonic abstracta, naturalist theories fail to provide an adequate causal explanation for such beliefs because they cannot show how the propositional content of the causally inert abstracta can figure in a chain of physical causes. Theories which explain such beliefs as “corresponding” to the abstracta, but without any causal relationship, entail impossibilities. God, or a (...)
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  37.  43
    A Clone by Any Other Name.Katherin A. Rogers - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):247-255.
    The possibility of cloning human beings raises the difficult question: Which human lives have value and deserve legal protection? Current cloning legislation tries to hide the problem by illegitimately renaming the entities and processes in question. The Delaware cloning bill, (SB55 2003/2004) for example, permits and protects the creation of human embryos by cloning, as long as they will be destroyed for research and therapeutic purposes, but it adopts terminology which renders its import unclear. I show that, in the case (...)
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  38.  10
    Perfect Being Theology.Rogers Katherin A. Rogers - 2000 - Reason and Religion.
    Katherin A. Rogers defends the traditional approach, considering contemporary criticisms but concluding that the most adequate account of the nature of God should build upon the foundation laid by the Medieval philosophers.
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  39.  2
    Book Review: Writing the New World: The Politics of Natural History in the Early Spanish Empire, by Mauro José Caraccioli. [REVIEW]Katherine A. Gordy - 2022 - Political Theory 50 (3):544-548.
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  40.  11
    A Medieval Approach to Keith Ward’s Christ and the Cosmos.Katherin A. Rogers - 2016 - Philosophia Christi 18 (2):323-332.
    In Christ and the Cosmos Keith Ward hopes to “reformulate” the conciliar statements of the Trinity and Incarnation since they cannot serve our post-Enlightenment, scientific age. I dispute Ward’s motivation, noting that the differences in perspective to which he points may not be as radical as he supposes. And his “reformulation” has worrisome consequences. I am especially concerned at his point that Jesus, while very special and perfectly good, is only human. This undermines free will theodicy, and, much more troubling, (...)
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  41.  6
    Expanding the Theory: Nonverbal Determination of Referents in a Joystick Task.Katherine A. Leighty, Sarah E. Cummins-Sebree & Dorothy M. Fragaszy - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):224-225.
    The arguments of Stoffregen & Bardy for studying perception based on the global array are intriguing. This theory can be examined in nonhuman species using nonverbal tasks. We examine how monkeys master a skill that incorporates a two-dimensional/three-dimensional interface. We feel this provides excellent support for Stoffregen & Bardy's theory.
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  42.  7
    A Most Unlikely God. [REVIEW]Katherin A. Rogers - 1998 - Religious Studies 34 (3):353-367.
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  43.  10
    A Green Theory of Technological Change: Ecologism and the Case for Technological Scepticism.Michael Keary - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory:1-24.
    Green political theory has a problem: it fails to account for human ingenuity. As a result, it has always struggled to refute the technologically optimistic notion that, in an era of rapid technological development, new technologies will materialise to resolve environmental ills. From ecologism’s first emergence, this idea has been its opponents’ ultimate recourse. It is especially significant because it denies the constitutive claim of ecologism that environmental problems require political solutions. It is in this claim that the (...) alternative to modernity and its ideologies is advanced. Yet, green scholars have never successfully refuted technological optimism; indeed, ecologism has always lost the scholarly battles over technological change, even as technology has failed to mitigate environmental catastrophe in the real world. This article’s green theory of technological change alters this: it shows that the green belief that technological development is unpredictable is in fact well-founded. In so doing, it buttresses the green challenge to modern political ideologies and justifies the movement for ecologism in the world. In short, it reasserts the claim that the natural is political and reinforces the need for a distinctly green version of political theory. (shrink)
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  44.  85
    The Divine Controller Argument for Incompatibilism.Katherin A. Rogers - 2012 - Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):275-294.
    Incompatibilists hold that, in order for you to be responsible, your choices must come from yourself; thus, determinism is incompatible with responsibility. One way of defending this claim is the Controller Argument: You are not responsible if your choices are caused by a controller, and natural determinism is relevantly similar to such control, therefore . . . Q.E.D. Compatibilists dispute both of these premises, insisting upon a relevant dissimilarity, or allowing, in a tollens move, that since we can be determined (...)
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  45.  6
    The Neoplatonic Metaphysics and Epistemology of Anselm of Canterbury.Katherin A. Rogers - 1997
    This work argues that Anselm was a Christian neoplatonist of the Augustinian variety, and that thus he was the inheritor of a powerful and systematic metaphysics and epistemology. The view that the world is an image of the divine mind and its ideas, a fragmented and temporal copy of of the perfect, eternal unity which is God, led Anselm to a strong exemplarism on the doctrine of the universals, and ultimately to a theistic idealism. This discussion concludes with a neoplatonic (...)
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  46.  15
    A History of Macedonia. 1. Historical Geography and Prehistory. [REVIEW]A. M. Snodgrass & N. G. L. Hammond - 1974 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 94:229-231.
  47.  6
    A Defense of Anselm’s Cur Deus Homo Argument.Katherin A. Rogers - 2000 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 74:187-200.
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  48.  43
    Anselm on the Ontological Status of Choice.Katherin A. Rogers - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):183-197.
    If God is the cause of everything that has any sort of existence at all, where is there room in the universe for rational creatures to have freedom of will? Isn’t a choice made by a created agent a sort of thing, and hence made by God? But if God causes our choices, how are we responsible such that we can be appropriately praised and blamed? Call this the dilemma of created freedom and divine omnipotence. Anselm solves the dilemma by (...)
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  49.  47
    Barry Miller, a Most Unlikely God (Notre Dame and London: University of Notre Dame Press, 1996) 175pp., £21.50 Sterling. [REVIEW]Katherin A. Rogers - 1998 - Religious Studies 34 (3):353-367.
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  50.  11
    Jeremy A. Greene;, Elizabeth Siegel Watkins . Prescribed: Writing, Filling, Using, and Abusing the Prescription in Modern America. X + 329 Pp., Illus., Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012. $65. [REVIEW]Robert A. Buerki - 2013 - Isis 104 (2):417-418.
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