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  1. Modifying the Environment or Human Nature? What is the Right Choice for Space Travel and Mars Colonisation?Maurizio Balistreri & Steven Umbrello - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (1):1-13.
    As space travel and intentions to colonise other planets are becoming the norm in public debate and scholarship, we must also confront the technical and survival challenges that emerge from these hostile environments. This paper aims to evaluate the various arguments proposed to meet the challenges of human space travel and extraterrestrial planetary colonisation. In particular, two primary solutions have been present in the literature as the most straightforward solutions to the rigours of extraterrestrial survival and flourishing: (1) geoengineering, where (...)
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  2. Could slaughterbots wipe out humanity? Assessment of the global catastrophic risk posed by autonomous weapons.Alexey Turchin - manuscript
    Recently criticisms against autonomous weapons were presented in a video in which an AI-powered drone kills a person. However, some said that this video is a distraction from the real risk of AI—the risk of unlimitedly self-improving AI systems. In this article, we analyze arguments from both sides and turn them into conditions. The following conditions are identified as leading to autonomous weapons becoming a global catastrophic risk: 1) Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) development is delayed relative to progress in narrow (...)
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  3. Identifying ethical issues of nanotechnologies.Joachim Schummer - manuscript
    in: Henk ten Have (ed.), Nanotechnology: Science, Ethics and Policy Issues, Paris (UNESCO Series in Ethics of Science and Technology), 2006 (forthcoming).
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  4. Crop biotechnology and developing countries.Geeta Bharathan, Shanti Chandrashekaran, Tony May & John Bryant - forthcoming - Bioethics for Scientists.
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  5. Technological revolutions and the problem of prediction.Nick Bostrom - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology. Wiley-Interscience, Hoboken, Nj.
  6. Sims and Vulnerability: On the Ethics of Creating Emulated Minds.Bartek Chomanski - forthcoming - Science and Engineering Ethics.
    It might become possible to build artificial minds with the capacity for experience. This raises a plethora of ethical issues, explored, among others, in the context of whole brain emulations (WBE). In this paper, I will take up the problem of vulnerability – given, for various reasons, less attention in the literature – that the conscious emulations will likely exhibit. Specifically, I will examine the role that vulnerability plays in generating ethical issues that may arise when dealing with WBEs. I (...)
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  7. 2.7. Biotechnology and Society.Amit Krishna De - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
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  8. Who Will Gain From Biotechnology?Jack Doyle - forthcoming - Steven M. Gendel Et Al.(Hg.), Agricultural Bioethics: Implications of Agricultural Biotechnology, Ames.
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  9. Complexity and uncertainty: A prudential approach to nanotechnology.Jean-Pierre Dupuy - forthcoming - Nanoethics. The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology. New Jersey.
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  10. Deliberative democracy and nanotechnology.Colin Farrelly - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  11. Personal choice in the coming era of nanomedicine.Robert A. Freitas Jr - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Social and Ethical Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  12. 3.4. Ethical Issues in the Generation and Utilisation of Knowledge in Biotechnology.What To Generate - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
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  13. Ethical issues.Sister Margaret John Kelly - forthcoming - Scarce Medical Resources and Justice.
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  14. RoboCup: the World Cup Initiative.H. Kitano, M. Asada, Y. Kuniyoshi, I. Noda & E. Osawa - forthcoming - Proceedings of Japanese Society for Ai Symposium.
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  15. On the national agenda: US congressional testimony on the societal implications of nanotechnology.Ray Kurzweil - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Societal Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  16. In the beginning: The US national nanotechnology initiative.Neal Lane & Thomas Kalil - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  17. Europeanizing the ethics of nanotechnology, rethinking nanoethics.Brice Laurent - forthcoming - Nanoethics: Do We Need a New Ethics for Nanotechnology?.
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  18. Nanoscience and nanoethics: Defining the disciplines.Patrick Lin & Fritz Allhoff - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
    This introduction provides background information on the emerging field of nanotechnology and its ethical dimensions. After defining nanotechnology and briefly discussing its status as a discipline, about which there exists a meta-controversy, this introduction turns to a discussion of the status of nanoethics and lays out particular issues of concern in the field, both current and emerging.
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  19. Synthetic biology marketplace: screening out terrorists.S. M. Maurer - forthcoming - Bioethics Forum.
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  20. Socio-ethical issues: Two conceptual frameworks.Thomas F. McMahon - forthcoming - Profit and Responsibility: Issues in Business and Professional Ethics.
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  21. Nanotechnology and the military.Daniel Moore - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Dimension of Nanotechnology.
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  22. Nanotechnologyand risk: What are the issues?Anne Ingeborg Myhr & Roy Ambli Dalmo - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  23. CSR Communication–An emerging field.Anne Ellerup Nielsen & Christa Thomsen - forthcoming - Hermes.
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  24. The emergence and formation of Finnish innovation policy.Marja-Liisa Niinikoski - forthcoming - Emergence: Complexity and Organization.
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  25. Foreword: Ethical Choices in Nanotechnology Development.M. C. Roco - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  26. The Social Scale: The Weight of Justice.Daniel Seltzer (ed.) - forthcoming - MIT Press.
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  27. The rules of engagement: Dialogue and democracy in creating nanotechnology futures.J. Stilgoe & J. Wilsdon - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Societal Implications of Nanotechnology. Wiley, Hoboken.
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  28. Some Issues.John Wiley - forthcoming - Contemporary Issues in Business Ethics.
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  29. University-Industry Relationships in Biotechnology: Convergence and Divergence in Goals and Expectations.William F. Woodman, Brian J. Reichel & Mack C. Shelley - forthcoming - Proceedings of the 1987 Iowa State University Agricultural Bioethics Symposium. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press.
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  30. Testing Reflexive Practitioner Dialogues: Capacities for Socio-technical Integration in Meditation Research.Mareike Smolka & Erik Fisher - 2024 - NanoEthics 18 (1):1-26.
    To put frameworks of Responsible Innovation and Responsible Research and Innovation (R(R)I) into practice, engagement methods have been developed to study and enhance technoscientific experts’ capacities to reflexively address value considerations in their work. These methods commonly rely on engagement between technoscientific experts and social scholars, which makes them vulnerable to structural barriers to interdisciplinary collaboration. To circumvent these barriers, we adapt Socio-Technical Integration Research (STIR) for broader use within technoscientific communities. We call this adaptation: reflexive practitioner dialogues. While the (...)
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  31. Digital Sequence Information and the Access and Benefit-Sharing Obligation of the Convention on Biological Diversity.Frank Irikefe Akpoviri, Syarul Nataqain Baharum & Zinatul Ashiqin Zainol - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (1):1-33.
    With the advent of synthetic biology, scientists are increasingly relying on digital sequence information, instead of physical genetic resources. This article examines the potential impact of this shift on the access and benefit-sharing (ABS) regime of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the Nagoya Protocol. These treaties require benefit-sharing with the owners of genetic resources. However, whether “genetic resources” include digital sequence information is unsettled. The CBD conceives genetic resources as genetic material containing functional units of heredity. “Material” implies (...)
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  32. Correction: Gene Drives as Interventions into Nature: the Coproduction of Ontology and Morality in the Gene Drive Debate.Keje Boersma, Bernice Bovenkerk & David Ludwig - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (2):1-1.
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  33. Gene Drives as Interventions into Nature: the Coproduction of Ontology and Morality in the Gene Drive Debate.Keje Boersma, Bernice Bovenkerk & David Ludwig - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (1):1-25.
    Gene drives are potentially ontologically and morally disruptive technologies. The potential to shape evolutionary processes and to eradicate (e.g. malaria-transmitting or invasive) populations raises ontological questions about evolution, nature, and wilderness. The transformative promises and perils of gene drives also raise pressing ethical and political concerns. The aim of this article is to arrive at a better understanding of the gene drive debate by analysing how ontological and moral assumptions are coproduced in this debate. Combining philosophical analysis with a critical (...)
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  34. Reflections on Perspectives of Transhumanism, Buddhist Transhumanism, and Buddhist Modernism on the Self.Vera Borrmann - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (3):1-6.
    A claim made by Buddhist or Buddhism-affine scholars such as Michael LaTorra and James Hughes is that transhumanism, neuroscience, and the teachings of Buddhism are compatible because they aim to alleviate suffering and pain and attain a stable state of happiness. This claim can be challenged. At first glance, the approach seems valid, because since the 1980s there have been dialogues and scientific collaborations with representatives of Tibetan Buddhism and scientists on the topics of neuroscience, consciousness, ethics and technology, and (...)
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  35. Spontaneous Comparison of Nanotechnology and Controversial Objects among Laypersons, Scientists and Environmentalists.Maïté Brunel, Céline Launay, Maryelle Henry, Nadine Cascino, Jacques Py & Valérie Le Floch - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (3):1-8.
    Nanotechnologies are a controversial topic, as they seem promising but also cause concern. Previous research has highlighted the potential link between nanotechnologies and other hazardous technologies. The aim of this research was to analyse the discourse on this topic by three groups of participants: laypersons, scientists and environmentalists. Thirty-four people (13 laypersons, ten scientists and eleven environmentalists) were interviewed using a semi-structured interview. Lexical and thematic analyses showed that scientists engage in explanatory discourse and perceive fewer risks than laypersons and (...)
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  36. A Framework for Future-Oriented Assessment of Converging Technologies at National Level.Sepehr Ghazinoory, Mehdi Fatemi, Fatemeh Saghafi, Abbas Ali Ahmadian & Shiva Tatina - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (2):1-28.
    Converging technologies require intelligent policy-making as they have significant capabilities to develop disruptive innovations. In this regard, future-oriented technology assessment is vital given the great uncertainty about the consequences of and barriers to accessing these technologies. However, few frameworks have been developed to evaluate converging technologies, and most of those have neglected the unique dimensions of these technologies. Therefore, this study aims to provide a policymaking framework for converging technology development. Accordingly, the proposed framework is designed through a meta-synthesis of (...)
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  37. Nano-hydroxyapatite Before the Science Court.Frederick C. Klaessig - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (2):1-28.
    In October 2015, the European Union’s Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety issued a Preliminary Opinion on Hydroxyapatite (nano). Past industrial experience with this material and participation in ISO/TC-229, Nanotechnologies, led me to submit comments on the Committee’s interpretations of physico-chemical properties, especially solubility, that in retrospect were also probing of the Committee’s collective understanding of nanomaterials. The Committee’s responses are examined against a background of other Opinions issued in the same time period. The expert’s role and responsibility, whether as an (...)
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  38. Does It Make Sense to Professionalize and Institutionalize Citizen Science?Dana Mahr - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (2):1-5.
    In this article, I share an anecdote about citizen science and use it to reflect on this rapidly growing field of scientific activity, its funding, and its governance. The paper focuses particularly on the epistemic and social challenges that accompany increasing demands for professionalization and institutionalization of the Citizen Sciences.
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  39. Talking About Responsible Quantum: “Awareness Is the Absolute Minimum that … We Need to Do”.Tara Roberson - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (1):1-12.
    Hype over novel quantum technologies has prompted discussion on the likely societal impacts of the sector. Calls to ensure the responsible development of quantum technologies are complicated by a lack of concrete case studies or real-world examples of irresponsible quantum. At this stage, responsible quantum faces a situation reminiscent of the Collingridge dilemma. In this dilemma, the moment in which discussion on societal risks and benefits can be most impactful is also the time when the least information is available. The (...)
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  40. Would the Convergence of Nanotechnology, Biotechnology, Information Technology and Cognitive Science Be a Springboard for Transhumanism and Posthumanism?Joseph Sawadogo & Jacques Simpore - 2023 - Open Journal of Philosophy 13 (4):681-695.
    Nanotechnologies, biotechnologies, information technologies and cognitive sciences (NBIC) have gradually gained traction in the United States of America (USA), subsequently expanding to Europe, and are now proliferating worldwide. Scientists are trying with more success to remove the causes of death by “repairing” humans, or even by “increasing” their physical and cognitive capacities. NBICs not only can help researchers promote “one health” by improving environmental conditions, human and animal health, but also, they can lead humanity towards transhumanism through eugenics. Thanks to (...)
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  41. Rethinking the Goals and Values of Nanoart During the War: an Artists’ Statement.Yana Suchikova & Serhii Kovachov - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (2):1-11.
    In this study, we analyze the development conditions of and trends in Ukrainian scientific art during the ongoing war with the Russian Federation. Based on our own experience, we demonstrate how the emphasis, values, and goals of scientific art shift under martial law. We also highlight the challenges and difficulties faced by Ukrainian artists and researchers who found themselves in the occupied territories. Our own experience involves the promotion of the scientific and artistic project “Nanoart. Science is art” and its (...)
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  42. Implicit Values in the Recent Carbon Nanotube Debate.Nicholas Surber, Rickard Arvidsson, Karl de Fine Licht & Karl Palmås - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (2):1-16.
    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the first examples of nanotechnology, with a history of promising uses and high expectations. This paper uses the recent debate over their future to explore both ethical and value-laden statements which unsettle the notion of CNTs as a value-free nanotechnology and their regulation as purely a technical affair. A point of departure is made with the inclusion of CNTs on the Substitute-It-Now list by the Swedish NGO ChemSec, an assessment process that anticipates and complements (...)
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  43. The Ethical Status of Germline Gene Editing in Future Space Missions: The Special Case of Positive Selection on Earth for Future Space Missions.Konrad Szocik - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (1):1-10.
    There are good theoretical rationales for considering germline gene editing (GGE) as a recommended and perhaps even necessary procedure for future long-term human space missions. This paper examines the arguments for applying GGE in a hypothetical future scenario where future parents living on Earth make decisions about applying GGE to their future children with the goal of allowing them to participate in space missions. The paper presents an ethical rationale for GGE. The paper also recognizes an area of potential moral (...)
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  44. The Ethics of Technology: How Can Indigenous Thought Contribute?John Weckert & Rogelio Bayod - 2023 - NanoEthics 17 (1):1-13.
    The ethics of technology is not as effective as it should. Despite decades of ethical discussion, development and use of new technologies continues apace without much regard to those discussions. Economic and other forces are too powerful. More focus needs to be placed on the values that underpin social attitudes to technology. By seriously looking at Indigenous thought and comparing it with the typical Western way of seeing the world, we can gain a better understanding of our own views. The (...)
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  45. Performance in the Workplace: a Critical Evaluation of Cognitive Enhancement.Cengiz Acarturk & Baris Mucen - 2022 - NanoEthics 16 (1):107-114.
    The popular debates about the future organization of work through artificial intelligence technologies focus on the replacement of human beings by novel technologies. In this essay, we oppose this statement by closely following what has been developed as AI technologies and analyzing how they work, specifically focusing on research that may impact work organizations. We develop this argument by showing that the recent research and developments in AI technologies focus on developing accurate and precise performance models, which in turn shapes (...)
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  46. Circles of Care for Safety: A Care Ethics Approach to Safe-by-Design.Lieke Baas, Suzanne Metselaar & Pim Klaassen - 2022 - NanoEthics 16 (2):167-179.
    Safe-by-Design is an approach to engineering that aims to integrate the value of safety in the design and development of new technologies. It does so by integrating knowledge of potential dangers in the design process and developing methods to design undesirable effects out of the innovation. Recent discussions have highlighted several challenges in conceptualizing safety and integrating the value into the design process. Therefore, some have argued to design for the _responsibility_ for safety, instead of for safety itself. However, this (...)
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  47. Temporarily Abled: How Exoskeleton Experience Reinvents Bodies in Spinal Cord Injury and Cerebrovascular Accidents.Denisa Butnaru - 2022 - NanoEthics 16 (1):51-64.
    Recent achievements in rehabilitative robotics modify essential parameters of the human body, such as motility. Exoskeletons used for persons with neurological impairments like spinal cord injury and stroke enter this category by rehabilitating and assisting damaged motor patterns, achievements thought impossible until not long ago. Unlike other examples leading to similar dysfunctions, such as diseases or tumors, the experience of an accident causing a spinal cord injury or the occurrence of a cerebrovascular accident is sudden and perceived as a radical (...)
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  48. Quantum Technologies and Society: Towards a Different Spin.Christopher Coenen, Alexei Grinbaum, Armin Grunwald, Colin Milburn & Pieter Vermaas - 2022 - NanoEthics 16 (1):1-6.
    Due primarily to technological advances over the last decade, quantum research has become a key priority area for science and technology policy all over the world. With this manifesto, we wish to prevent quantum technology from running into fiascos of implementation at the interface of science and society. To this end, we identify key stumbling blocks and propose recommendations.
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  49. Enhancement Technologies and the Politics of Life.Diego Compagna & Melike Şahinol - 2022 - NanoEthics 16 (1):15-20.
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  50. Enhancement Technologies and the Politics of Life: Interfaces of Art and Science.Diego Compagna & Melike Şahinol - 2022 - NanoEthics 16 (2):195-196.
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