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1113 found
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  1. Could Slaughterbots Wipe Out Humanity? Assessment of the Global Catastrophic Risk Posed by Autonomous Weapons.Alexey Turchin - manuscript
    Recently criticisms against autonomous weapons were presented in a video in which an AI-powered drone kills a person. However, some said that this video is a distraction from the real risk of AI—the risk of unlimitedly self-improving AI systems. In this article, we analyze arguments from both sides and turn them into conditions. The following conditions are identified as leading to autonomous weapons becoming a global catastrophic risk: 1) Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) development is delayed relative to progress in narrow (...)
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  2. Identifying Ethical Issues of Nanotechnologies.Joachim Schummer - manuscript
    in: Henk ten Have (ed.), Nanotechnology: Science, Ethics and Policy Issues, Paris (UNESCO Series in Ethics of Science and Technology), 2006 (forthcoming).
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  3. Phenomenological Epistemology and Nanotechnology: Scanning Tunneling Microscopy as Hermeneutic Technics.Marina P. Banchetti - forthcoming - In Jean-Pierre Noel Llored (ed.), Ethics and Chemistry: A Multidisciplinary Investigation. London, UK:
  4. Crop Biotechnology and Developing Countries.Geeta Bharathan, Shanti Chandrashekaran, Tony May & John Bryant - forthcoming - Bioethics for Scientists.
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  5. Technological Revolutions and the Problem of Prediction.Nick Bostrom - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology. Wiley-Interscience, Hoboken, Nj.
  6. Temporarily Abled: How Exoskeleton Experience Reinvents Bodies in Spinal Cord Injury and Cerebrovascular Accidents.Denisa Butnaru - forthcoming - NanoEthics:1-14.
    Recent achievements in rehabilitative robotics modify essential parameters of the human body, such as motility. Exoskeletons used for persons with neurological impairments like spinal cord injury and stroke enter this category by rehabilitating and assisting damaged motor patterns, achievements thought impossible until not long ago. Unlike other examples leading to similar dysfunctions, such as diseases or tumors, the experience of an accident causing a spinal cord injury or the occurrence of a cerebrovascular accident is sudden and perceived as a radical (...)
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  7. 2.7. Biotechnology and Society.Amit Krishna De - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
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  8. Who Will Gain From Biotechnology?Jack Doyle - forthcoming - Steven M. Gendel Et Al.(Hg.), Agricultural Bioethics: Implications of Agricultural Biotechnology, Ames.
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  9. Complexity and Uncertainty: A Prudential Approach to Nanotechnology.Jean-Pierre Dupuy - forthcoming - Nanoethics. The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology. New Jersey.
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  10. Deliberative Democracy and Nanotechnology.Colin Farrelly - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  11. Personal Choice in the Coming Era of Nanomedicine.Robert A. Freitas Jr - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Social and Ethical Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  12. 3.4. Ethical Issues in the Generation and Utilisation of Knowledge in Biotechnology.What To Generate - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
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  13. Ethical Issues.Sister Margaret John Kelly - forthcoming - Scarce Medical Resources and Justice.
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  14. RoboCup: The World Cup Initiative.H. Kitano, M. Asada, Y. Kuniyoshi, I. Noda & E. Osawa - forthcoming - Proceedings of Japanese Society for Ai Symposium.
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  15. Techno-species in the Becoming Towards a Relational Ontology of Multi-species Assemblages.Tanja Kubes & Thomas Reinhardt - forthcoming - NanoEthics:1-11.
    Robots equipped with artificial intelligence pose a huge challenge to traditional ontological differentiations between the spheres of the human and the non-human. Drawing mainly from neo-animistic and perspectivist approaches in anthropology and science and technology studies, the paper explores the potential of new forms of interconnectedness and rhizomatic entanglements between humans and a world transcending the boundaries between species and material spheres. We argue that intelligent robots meet virtually all criteria Western biology came up with to define ‘life’ and that (...)
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  16. On the National Agenda: US Congressional Testimony on the Societal Implications of Nanotechnology.Ray Kurzweil - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Societal Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  17. In the Beginning: The US National Nanotechnology Initiative.Neal Lane & Thomas Kalil - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  18. Europeanizing the Ethics of Nanotechnology, Rethinking Nanoethics.Brice Laurent - forthcoming - Nanoethics: Do We Need a New Ethics for Nanotechnology?.
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  19. Nanoscience and Nanoethics: Defining the Disciplines.Patrick Lin & Fritz Allhoff - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
    This introduction provides background information on the emerging field of nanotechnology and its ethical dimensions. After defining nanotechnology and briefly discussing its status as a discipline, about which there exists a meta-controversy, this introduction turns to a discussion of the status of nanoethics and lays out particular issues of concern in the field, both current and emerging.
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  20. Synthetic Biology Marketplace: Screening Out Terrorists.S. M. Maurer - forthcoming - Bioethics Forum.
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  21. Socio-Ethical Issues: Two Conceptual Frameworks.Thomas F. McMahon - forthcoming - Profit and Responsibility: Issues in Business and Professional Ethics.
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  22. “Manufacturing Life” in Real Work Processes? New Manufacturing Environments with Micro- and Nanorobotics.António Brandão Moniz & Bettina-Johanna Krings - forthcoming - NanoEthics:1-17.
    The convergence of nano-, bio-, information, and cognitive sciences and technologies is advancing continuously in many societal spheres. This also applies to the manufacturing sector, where technological transformations in robotics push the boundaries of human–machine interaction. Here, current technological advances in micro- and nanomanufacturing are accompanied by new socio-economic concepts for different sectors of the process industry. Although these developments are still ongoing, the blurring of the boundaries of HMI in processes at the micro- and nano- level can already be (...)
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  23. Nanotechnology and the Military.Daniel Moore - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Dimension of Nanotechnology.
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  24. Nanotechnologyand Risk: What Are the Issues?Anne Ingeborg Myhr & Roy Ambli Dalmo - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  25. CSR Communication–An Emerging Field.Anne Ellerup Nielsen & Christa Thomsen - forthcoming - Hermes.
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  26. The Emergence and Formation of Finnish Innovation Policy.Marja-Liisa Niinikoski - forthcoming - Emergence: Complexity and Organization.
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  27. Rethinking Assistive Technologies: Users, Environments, Digital Media, and App-Practices of Hearing.Beate Ochsner, Markus Spöhrer & Robert Stock - forthcoming - NanoEthics:1-15.
    Against the backdrop of an aging world population increasingly affected by a diverse range of abilities and disabilities as well as the rise of ubiquitous computing and digital app cultures, this paper questions how mobile technologies mediate between heterogeneous environments and sensing beings. To approach the current technological manufacturing of the senses, two lines of thought are of importance: First, there is a need to critically reflect upon the concept of assistive technologies as artifacts providing tangible solutions for a specific (...)
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  28. Foreword: Ethical Choices in Nanotechnology Development.M. C. Roco - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Social Implications of Nanotechnology.
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  29. The Social Scale: The Weight of Justice.Daniel Seltzer (ed.) - forthcoming - MIT Press.
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  30. The Rules of Engagement: Dialogue and Democracy in Creating Nanotechnology Futures.J. Stilgoe & J. Wilsdon - forthcoming - Nanoethics: The Ethical and Societal Implications of Nanotechnology. Wiley, Hoboken.
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  31. Manufacturing Life, What Life? Ethical Debates Around Biobanks and Social Robots.Núria Vallès-Peris, Violeta Argudo-Portal & Miquel Domènech - forthcoming - NanoEthics:1-14.
    In this paper, we explore how the definition of life takes on an essential character in the ethical debates around health technologies, with life thus being manufactured in the tensions and conflicts around the use of such artefacts and devices. We introduce concepts from science and technology studies to approach bioethics, overcoming the dualistic conception that separates the natural and the technological and questioning the dominant rationality that divides life into dualities. Drawing on two research projects in which we have (...)
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  32. Some Issues.John Wiley - forthcoming - Contemporary Issues in Business Ethics.
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  33. University-Industry Relationships in Biotechnology: Convergence and Divergence in Goals and Expectations.William F. Woodman, Brian J. Reichel & Mack C. Shelley - forthcoming - Proceedings of the 1987 Iowa State University Agricultural Bioethics Symposium. Ames, Iowa: Iowa State University Press.
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  34. From Nano Backlash to Public Indifference: Some Reflections on French Public Dialogues on Nanotechnology.Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):191-201.
    The hype surrounding the emergence of nanotechnology proved extremely effective to raise public attention and controversies in the early 2000s. A proactive attitude prevailed resulting in the integration of social scientists upstream at the research level, research programs on Ethical, Legal and Societal Impacts, and various public engagement initiatives such as nanojury and citizen conferences. Twenty years later, what happened to the promises of SHS integration and public engagement in nanotechnology? Was it part of the hype, one of the many (...)
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  35. Safe by Design for Nanomaterials—Late Lessons from Early Warnings for Sustainable Innovation.Maurice Edward Brennan & Eugenia Valsami-Jones - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):99-103.
    The Safe by Design conceptual initiative being developed for nanomaterials offers a template for a new sustainable innovation approach for advanced materials with four important sustainability characteristics. Firstly, it requires potential toxicity risks to be evaluated earlier in the innovation cycle simultaneously with its chemical functionality and possible commercial applications. Secondly, it offers future options for reducing animal laboratory testing by early assessment using in silico predictive toxicological approaches, minimizing the number that reaches in vitro and in vivo trials. Thirdly, (...)
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  36. Content Analysis of Nano-news Published Between 2011 and 2018 in Turkish Newspapers.Şeyma Çalık, Ayşe Koç, Tuba Şenel Zor, Erhan Zor & Oktay Aslan - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):117-132.
    The aim of this study is to examine the distribution of news related to nanoscience and nanotechnology published in Turkish newspapers between 2011 and 2018. Nine Turkish newspapers selected using criterion sampling were investigated and the document analysis method was used to analyze them. The electronic archives of the newspapers were used to collect data and the word “nano” was used as a keyword. The obtained data were analyzed with the content analysis technique. While analyzing the news stories, categorization was (...)
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  37. Who Cares for Agile Work? In/Visibilized Work Practices and Their Emancipatory Potential.Alev Coban & Klara-Aylin Wenten - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):57-70.
    The future of work has become a pressing matter of concern: Researchers, business consultancies, and industrial companies are intensively studying how new work models could be best implemented to increase workplace flexibility and creativity. In particular, the agile model has become one of the “must-have” elements for re-organizing work practices, especially for technology development work. However, the implementation of agile work often comes together with strong presumptions: it is regarded as an inevitable tool that can be universally integrated into different (...)
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  38. Understanding Technology, Changing the World.Christopher Coenen - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):203-209.
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  39. Towards Emancipatory Technology Studies.Philipp Frey, Simon Schaupp & Klara-Aylin Wenten - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):19-27.
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  40. International Handbook on Responsible Innovation — a Global Resource: René von Schomberg, Jonathan Hankins (eds.) 2019 (Cheltenham, Edward Elgar) ISBN: 9781784718855. 556 pp.Steffi Friedrichs - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):133-141.
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  41. Precaution as a Risk in Data Gaps and Sustainable Nanotechnology Decision Support Systems: a Case Study of Nano-Enabled Textiles Production.Irini Furxhi, Finbarr Murphy, Craig A. Poland, Martin Cunneen & Martin Mullins - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):245-270.
    In light of the potential long-term societal and economic benefits of novel nano-enabled products, there is an evident need for research and development to focus on closing the gap in nano-materials safety. Concurrent reflection on the impact of decision-making tools, which may lack the capability to assist sophisticated judgements around the risks and benefits of the introduction of novel products, is essential. This paper addresses the potential for extant decision support tools to default to a precautionary principle position in the (...)
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  42. How Can I Contribute? Citizen Engagement in the Development of Nanotechnology for Health.Sikke R. Jansma, Anne M. Dijkstra & Menno D. T. de Jong - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):211-227.
    Scholars and policymakers have increasingly advocated to engage citizens more substantially in the development of science and technology. However, to a large extent it has remained unknown how citizens can contribute to technology development. In this study, we systematically characterized citizens’ contributions in the development of nanotechnology for health. We explored to which technology aspects citizens are able to provide suggestions on and on which values their suggestions are based. Fifty citizens in the Netherlands were asked to discuss different applications (...)
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  43. European Legal Protection of Employees’ Health Working with Nanoparticles in the Context of the Christian Vision of Human Work.Maciej Jarota - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):105-115.
    The article analyses European regulations concerning the health protection at work with nanomaterials in the context of the Christian vision of human work. The increasingly widespread presence of nanotechnology in workplaces requires serious reflection on the adequacy of employers’ measures to protect workers’ health from the risks in the workplace. The lack of clear guidance in European legislation directly concerning work with nanoparticles is problematic. Moreover, the health consequences for workers using nanomaterials in the work process are not fully explored (...)
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  44. Dialectics of Technical Emancipation—Considerations on a Reflexive, Sustainable Technology Development.Georg Jochum - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):29-41.
    The modern idea of emancipation is linked to the goal of overcoming dependencies and domination. However, as argued in the article, negative dialectics of emancipation must also be problematized. The project of emancipation, as it was formulated in the Age of Enlightenment, was often particular and was associated with the establishment of new forms of domination. Especially the project of liberation from the constraints of nature through technical development led to the domination of nature. In view of the ecological crisis, (...)
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  45. Traversing Technology Trajectories.Frederick Klaessig - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):149-168.
    Scholars in science and technology studies, as well as economics and innovation studies, utilize the trajectory metaphor in describing a technology’s maturation. Impetus and purpose may differ, but the trajectory serves as a shared tool for assessing social change either in society at large or within a market sector, a firm, or a discipline. In reverse, the lens of a technology trajectory can be a basis for assessing technology, estimating economic growth, and selecting among plausible product development pathways. Emerging technologies (...)
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  46. Responsible Innovation Definitions, Practices, and Motivations from Nanotechnology Researchers in Food and Agriculture.Adam E. Kokotovich, Jennifer Kuzma, Christopher L. Cummings & Khara Grieger - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):229-243.
    The growth of responsible innovation scholarship has been mirrored by a proliferation of RI definitions and practices, as well as a recognition of the importance of context for RI. This study investigates how researchers in the field of nanotechnology for food and agriculture define and practice RI, as well as what motivations they see for pursuing RI. We conducted 20 semi-structured interviews with nano-agrifood researchers from industry and academia in the USA, where we asked them to describe their RI definitions, (...)
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  47. Technopolitics From Below: A Framework for the Analysis of Digital Politics of Production.Simon Schaupp - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):71-86.
    This article develops a multi-level framework for the analysis of a bottom-up politics of technology at the workplace. It draws on a multi-case study on algorithmic management of manual labor in manufacturing and delivery platforms in Germany. In researching how workers influenced the use of algorithmic management systems, the concept of technopolitics is developed to refer to three different arenas of negotiation: the arena of regulation, where institutional framings of technologies in production are negotiated, typically between state actors, employers’ associations, (...)
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  48. Thoughts Unlocked by Technology—a Survey in Germany About Brain-Computer Interfaces.J. R. Schmid, O. Friedrich, S. Kessner & R. J. Jox - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (3):303-313.
    A brain-computer interface is a rapidly evolving neurotechnology connecting the human brain with a computer. In its classic form, brain activity is recorded and used to control external devices like protheses or wheelchairs. Thus, BCI users act with the power of their thoughts. While the initial development has focused on medical uses of BCIs, non-medical applications have recently been gaining more attention, for example in automobiles, airplanes, and the entertainment context. However, the attitudes of the general public towards BCIs have (...)
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  49. Citizen Science Fiction: The Potential of Situated Speculative Prototyping for Public Engagement on Emerging Technologies.Jantien W. Schuijer, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse & Frank Kupper - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):1-18.
    In response to calls for a research and innovation system that is more open to public scrutiny, we have seen a growth of formal and informal public engagement activities in the past decades. Nevertheless, critiques of several persistent routines in public engagement continue to resurface, in particular the focus on expert knowledge, cognitive exchange, risk discourse, and understandings of public opinion as being static. In an attempt to break out of these routines, we experimented with an innovative engagement format that (...)
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  50. Juggling Roles, Experiencing Dilemmas: The Challenges of SSH Scholars in Public Engagement.Jantien Willemijn Schuijer, Jacqueline Broerse & Frank Kupper - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (2):169-189.
    The progressive introduction of emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology, has created a true testing ground for public engagement initiatives. Widespread experimentation has taken place with public and stakeholder dialogue and inclusive approaches to research and innovation more generally. Against this backdrop, Social Science and Humanities scholars have started to manifest themselves differently. They have taken on new roles in the public engagement field, including more practical and policy-oriented ones that seek to actively open the R&I system to wider public scrutiny. (...)
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1 — 50 / 1113