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Christopher Hookway [181]Christopher J. Hookway [1]
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Christopher Hookway
University of Sheffield
  1. Some Varieties of Epistemic Injustice: Reflections on Fricker.Christopher Hookway - 2010 - Episteme 7 (2):151-163.
    Miranda Fricker's important study of epistemic injustice is focussed primarily on testimonial injustice and hermeneutic injustice. It explores how agents' capacities to make assertions and provide testimony can be impaired in ways that can involve forms of distinctively epistemic injustice. My paper identifies a wider range of forms of epistemic injustice that do not all involve the ability to make assertions or offer testimony. The paper considers some examples of some other ways in which injustice can prevent someone from participating (...)
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  2.  57
    Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 1985 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Ted Honderich.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  3.  28
    Quine.Christopher Hookway - 2013 - Polity.
    This book provides a clear and comprehensive introduction to the work of Willard van Orman Quine, the most important and influential American philosopher of the post-war period. An understanding of Quine's work is essential for anyone who wishes to follow contemporary debates in the philosophy of language, the philosophy of mind and metaphysics. Hookway traces the development of Quine's work from his early criticisms of logical positivism and empiricism to his more recent theories about mind and meaning. He gives particular (...)
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  4.  60
    Unnatural Doubts.Christopher Hookway - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (172):389.
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  5.  69
    Truth, rationality, and pragmatism: themes from Peirce.Christopher Hookway (ed.) - 2000 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Christopher Hookway presents a series of studies of themes from the work of the great American philosopher and pragmatist, Charles S. Peirce (1839-1913). These themes center on the question of how we are to investigate the world rationally. Hookway shows how Peirce's ideas about this continue to play an important role in contemporary philosophy.
  6. Scepticism.Christopher Hookway - 1990 - New York: Routledge.
    Scepticism is a subject which has preoccupied philosophers for two thousand years. This book presents an historical perspective on scepticism by considering contrasting views, such as those of Sextus Empiricus, Descartes and Hume, on why scepticism is important. With its historical perspective and analysis of contemporary discussions, _Scepticism_ provides a broad focus on the subject, differing from other discussions of the topic in the importance it attaches to scepticism both in Greek thought and in pre-twentieth century views generally.
  7.  53
    The pragmatic maxim: essays on Peirce and pragmatism.Christopher Hookway - 2012 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Christopher Hookway presents a series of essays on the work of Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1913), the 'founder of pragmatism' and one of the most important and original American philosophers.
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  8. How to be a Virtue Epistemologist.Christopher Hookway - 2003 - In Linda Zagzebski & Michael DePaul (eds.), Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives From Ethics and Epistemology. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 183--202.
    This chapter points out that standard versions of virtue epistemology accept and are motivated by the same central problems in epistemology — such as analyzing the concepts of knowledge and justification, and addressing skeptical challenges — which motivate contemporary epistemology. The only significant difference is that virtue epistemology claims that the concepts of knowledge and justification must be analyzed in terms of virtues. What motivates virtue ethicists, however, is not what is motivating other ethicists. The contemporary census amongst ethicists has (...)
     
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  9.  89
    Pragmatism.Cathy Legg & Christopher Hookway - 2019 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    An overview of a philosophical movement originating in the United States of America in the 19th century.
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  10. Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 1985 - Mind 95 (377):138-140.
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  11.  74
    Quine: Language, Experience, and Reality.Christopher Hookway - 1988 - Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.
    Introduction Quine was born in. He studied as a graduate student at Harvard, and apart from short visits to Oxford, Paris and other centres of learning, ...
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  12.  72
    Pragmatism.Christopher Hookway - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  13. Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 1987 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (1):117-119.
     
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  14. Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 1986 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 22 (3):327-338.
     
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  15.  13
    Peirce.Timothy H. Engstrom & Christopher Hookway - 1989 - Philosophical Quarterly 39 (155):248.
  16. Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 1999 - In Ted Honderich (ed.), The Philosophers: Introducing Great Western Thinkers. Oxford University Press.
     
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  17. Affective states and epistemic immediacy.Christopher Hookway - 2003 - Metaphilosophy 34 (1-2):78-96.
    Ethics studies the evaluation of actions, agents and their mental states and characters from a distinctive viewpoint or employing a distinctive vocabulary. And epistemology examines the evaluation of actions (inquiries and assertions), agents (believers and inquirers), and their states (belief and attitudes) from a different viewpoint. Given this common concern with evaluation, we should surely expect there to be considerable similarities between the issues examined and the ideas employed in the two areas. However, when we examine most textbooks in ethics (...)
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  18. Two Conceptions of Moral Realism.Jonathan Dancy & Christopher Hookway - 1986 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 60 (1):167 - 205.
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  19. Epistemology and inquiry: The primacy of practice.Christopher Hookway - 2006 - In Stephen Hetherington (ed.), Epistemology Futures. Oxford University Press. pp. 95--110.
     
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  20.  10
    Truth, Rationality, and Pragmatism: Themes from Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):117-119.
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  21. Cognitive virtues and epistemic evaluations.Christopher Hookway - 1994 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (2):211 – 227.
    (1994). Cognitive virtues and epistemic evaluations. International Journal of Philosophical Studies: Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 211-227. doi: 10.1080/09672559408570791.
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  22. Epistemic akrasia and epistemic virtue.Christopher Hookway - 2001 - In Abrol Fairweather & Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski (eds.), Virtue Epistemology: Essays on Epistemic Virtue and Responsibility. Oxford University Press. pp. 178--99.
     
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  23. Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (237):418-419.
     
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  24. Truth, Rationality, and Pragmatism: Themes from Peirce.Christopher Hookway - 2002 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 38 (3):441-449.
     
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  25.  9
    Two Conceptions of Moral Realism.Jonathan Dancy & Christopher Hookway - 1986 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 60 (1):167-206.
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  26. Questions, epistemology, and inquiries.Christopher Hookway - 2008 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 77 (1):1-21.
    Questions are relevant to epistemology because they formulate cognitive goals, they are used to elicit information, they are used in Socratic reflection and knowledge sentences often have indirect question complements. The paper explores what capacities we must possess if we are to understand questions and identify and evaluate potential answers to them. The later sections explore different ways in which these matters depend upon pragmatic and other contextual considerations.
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  27. Epistemic norms and theoretical deliberation.Christopher Hookway - 1999 - Ratio 12 (4):380–397.
    Some fundamental epistemic norms govern the conduct of the activity of inquiry and the progress of theoretical deliberation. We monitor our deliberations by raising questions about how they should be conducted and about how effectively they have been carried out. Such questions ‘occur’ to us: we are often passive recipients of them. The paper discusses what determines when questions should occur to us and it investigates how far these observations can be seen as threatening our freedom of mind. These phenomena (...)
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  28.  16
    Quine: Language, Experience and Reality.Robert Kirk & Christopher Hookway - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (3):479.
  29.  41
    Fallibilism and the Aim of Inquiry.Christopher Hookway - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):1-22.
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  30. Fallibilism and the Aim of Inquiry.Christopher Hookway - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):1 - 22.
  31.  29
    The Presidential Address: Questions of Context.Christopher Hookway - 1996 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96 (1):1 - 16.
    Christopher Hookway; I *—The Presidential Address: Questions of Context, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 96, Issue 1, 1 June 1996, Pages 1–16, h.
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  32. Doubt: Affective States and the Regulation of Inquiry.Christopher Hookway - 1998 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 24 (sup1):203-225.
    Pragmatists challenge a sharp separation of issues of theoretical and practical rationality. This can encourage a sort of anti-realism: our classifications and theories are shaped by our interests and practical concerns. However, it need not do this. A more fundamental theme is that cognition is itself an activity, the attempt to solve problems and discover truths effectively and responsibly. Evidence has to be collected, experiments have to be devised and carried out, dialogues must be engaged in with fellow inquirers, decisions (...)
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  33.  76
    The inaugural address: Fallibilism and the aim of inquiry.Christopher Hookway - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):1–22.
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  34.  22
    5 Truth, Reality, and Convergence.Christopher Hookway - 2004 - In C. J. Misak (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Peirce. Cambridge University Press. pp. 127.
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  35.  54
    Mimicking Foundationalism: on Sentiment and Self‐control.Christopher Hookway - 1993 - European Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):156-174.
  36.  80
    13 Emotions and epistemic evaluations.Christopher Hookway - 2002 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen P. Stich & Michael Siegal (eds.), The Cognitive Basis of Science. Cambridge University Press. pp. 251.
  37. Reasons for belief, reasoning, virtues.Christopher Hookway - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 130 (1):47--70.
    The paper offers an explanation of what reasons for belief are, following Paul Grice in focusing on the roles of reasons in the goal-directed activity of reasoning. Reasons are particularly salient considerations that we use as indicators of the truth of beliefs and candidates for belief. Reasons are distinguished from enabling conditions by being things that we should be able to attend to in the course of our reasoning, and in assessing how well our beliefs are supported. The final section (...)
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  38.  14
    Fallibilism and the Aim of Inquiry.Christopher Hookway - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):1-22.
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  39. Quine: Language, Experience and Reality.Christopher Hookway - 1989 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (4):557-567.
     
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  40.  59
    Regulating Inquiry.Christopher Hookway - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 5:149-157.
    Appeal to the idea of an epistemic virtue promises insight into our practices of epistemic evaluation through employing a distinctive view of the ways in which we formulate and respond to reasons. Traits of ‘epistemic character’ guide our reasoning and reflection, and can be responsible for various forms of irrationality. One component of such a view is that emotions, sentiments and other affective states are far more central to questions of epistemic rationality than is commonly supposed. This paper explains why (...)
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  41.  7
    Change in View: Principles of Reasoning.Christopher Hookway - 1989 - Philosophical Quarterly 39 (155):242-245.
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  42. Modest Transcendental Arguments and Sceptical Doubts: A Reply to Stroud.Christopher Hookway - 1999 - In Robert Stern (ed.), Transcendental Arguments: Problems and Prospects. Oxford University Press. pp. 173--87.
     
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  43.  8
    Strands of System: The Philosophy of Charles Peirce.Christopher Hookway & Douglas R. Anderson - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (2):286.
    Each volume in the Purdue University Press Series in the History of Philosophy examines the fundamental ideas of a single philosopher, presenting one basic text by the thinker in question, and supplementing this by “a very thorough and up-to-date commentary.” The format is most successful when a reasonably short classic work containing the subject’s most important claims can be found. We might expect it to work much less well with a thinker like Peirce, serious study of whose work cannot avoid (...)
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  44.  65
    Scepticism and the Principle of Inferential Justification.Christopher Hookway - 2000 - Noûs 34 (s1):344 - 365.
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  45.  43
    "... A Sort of Composite Photograph": Pragmatism, Ideas, and Schematism.Christopher Hookway - 2002 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 38 (1/2):29 - 45.
  46. Quine: Language, Experience and Reality.Christopher Hookway - 1989 - Mind 98 (392):637-639.
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  47.  28
    The Philosophy of Charles S. Peirce: A Critical Introduction.Christopher Hookway - 1982 - Philosophical Quarterly 32 (126):87.
  48. The Pragmatist Maxim and the Proof of Pragmatism.Christopher Hookway - 2005 - Cognitio 6 (1).
     
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  49. Peirce and Skepticism.Christopher Hookway - 2008 - In John Greco (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism. Oxford University Press.
  50.  95
    Regulating Inquiry.Christopher Hookway - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 5:149-157.
    Appeal to the idea of an epistemic virtue promises insight into our practices of epistemic evaluation through employing a distinctive view of the ways in which we formulate and respond to reasons. Traits of ‘epistemic character’ guide our reasoning and reflection, and can be responsible for various forms of irrationality. One component of such a view is that emotions, sentiments and other affective states are far more central to questions of epistemic rationality than is commonly supposed. This paper explains why (...)
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