Results for 'Fiction'

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Bibliography: Modal Fictionalism in Metaphysics
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  1. Darwin and George Eliot: Plotting and organicism.Nineteenth-Century Fiction - forthcoming - History of Science.
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  2. John Woods.Fortress Fiction - 1996 - In Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.), Fiction updated: theories of fictionality, narratology, and poetics. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press. pp. 39.
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  3. Mother-infant bonding.A. Scientific Fiction - 1994 - Human Nature 5 (1):69.
     
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  4. Nicholas Rescher.Who Invented Fiction - 1996 - In Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.), Fiction updated: theories of fictionality, narratology, and poetics. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  5.  20
    Character as Moral Fiction.Mark Alfano - 2013 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Everyone wants to be virtuous, but recent psychological investigations suggest that this may not be possible. Mark Alfano challenges this theory and asks, not whether character is empirically adequate, but what characters human beings could have and develop. Although psychology suggests that most people do not have robust character traits such as courage, honesty and open-mindedness, Alfano argues that we have reason to attribute these virtues to people because such attributions function as self-fulfilling prophecies - children become more studious if (...)
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  6. Felix Martinez-bonati.On Fictional Discourse - 1996 - In Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.), Fiction updated: theories of fictionality, narratology, and poetics. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  7. Ruth Ronen.Are Fictional Worlds Possible - 1996 - In Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.), Fiction updated: theories of fictionality, narratology, and poetics. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  8.  22
    The fiction view of models reloaded.Roman Frigg & James Nguyen - 2016 - The Monist 99 (3):225-242.
    In this paper we explore the constraints that our preferred account of scientific representation places on the ontology of scientific models. Pace the Direct Representation view associated with Arnon Levy and Adam Toon we argue that scientific models should be thought of as imagined systems, and clarify the relationship between imagination and representation.
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  9. Thomas Nadelhoffer and Adam Feltz.Folk Intuitions, Slippery Slopes & Necessary Fictions - 2007 - In Peter A. French & Howard K. Wettstein (eds.), Philosophy and the Empirical. Blackwell. pp. 31--202.
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  10. Brain Fiction: Self-Deception and the Riddle of Confabulation.William Hirstein - 2005 - MIT Press.
    [This download contains the Table of Contents and Chapter 1.] This first book-length study of confabulation breaks ground in both philosophy and cognitive science.
  11.  51
    Models and fiction.Roman Frigg - 2010 - Synthese 172 (2):251-268.
    Most scientific models are not physical objects, and this raises important questions. What sort of entity are models, what is truth in a model, and how do we learn about models? In this paper I argue that models share important aspects in common with literary fiction, and that therefore theories of fiction can be brought to bear on these questions. In particular, I argue that the pretence theory as developed by Walton (1990, Mimesis as make-believe: on the foundations (...)
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  12. Falsehoods in Film: Documentary vs Fiction.Stacie Friend - 2021 - Studies in Documentary Film 15 (2):151-162.
    I claim that we should reject a sharp distinction between fiction and non-fiction according to which documentary is a faithful representation of the facts, whilst fiction films merely invite us to imagine what is made up. Instead, we should think of fiction and non-fiction as genres: categories whose membership is determined by a combination of non-essential features and which influence appreciation in a variety of ways. An objection to this approach is that it renders the (...)
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  13.  10
    Fiction, Nonfiction, and Deceptive Photographic Representation.Paloma Atencia-Linares - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (1):19-30.
  14.  6
    Fiction and scientific representation.Roman Frigg - 2008 - In Roman Frigg & Matthew Hunter (eds.), Beyond Mimesis and Convention: Representation in Art and Science. Boston Studies in Philosophy of Science. pp. 97-138.
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  15. The Epistemic Value of Speculative Fiction.Johan De Smedt & Helen De Cruz - 2015 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):58-77.
    Speculative fiction, such as science fiction and fantasy, has a unique epistemic value. We examine similarities and differences between speculative fiction and philosophical thought experiments in terms of how they are cognitively processed. They are similar in their reliance on mental prospection, but dissimilar in that fiction is better able to draw in readers (transportation) and elicit emotional responses. By its use of longer, emotionally poignant narratives and seemingly irrelevant details, speculative fiction allows for a (...)
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  16.  14
    Morals in Fiction and Fictional Morality.Kendall L. Walton & Michael Tanner - 1994 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 68 (1):27-66.
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  17. Kierkegaard: A Fiction.[author unknown] - 1976 - Religious Studies 12 (1):119-120.
     
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  18.  6
    Fact and Fiction: George Egerton and Nellie Shaw.Sharon Butler, Peggy & Bert Bundy - 1988 - Feminist Review 30 (1):25-35.
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  19. Interiorizing Ethics through Science Fiction. Brave New World as a Paradigmatic Case Study.Raquel Cascales - 2021 - In Edward Brooks, Emma Cohen de Lara, Álvaro Sánchez-Ostiz & José M. Torralba (eds.), Literature and Character Education in Universities. Theory, Method, and Text Analysis. Routledge. pp. 153-169.
    Raquel Cascales and Luis Echarte focus on the development of practical wisdom and what they call ‘seeing with the heart’ for science students by means of reading science fiction literature. They argue that literature can bring the student into contact with the reality of moral life as moral dilemmas are made concrete by the characters and circumstances in a novel. They provide an analysis of how Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World can be read in the classroom and show how (...)
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  20. Emotion in the Appreciation of Fiction.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran - 2018 - Journal of Literary Theory 12.
    Why is it that we respond emotionally to plays, movies, and novels and feel moved by characters and situations that we know do not exist? This question, which constitutes the kernel of the debate on »the paradox of fiction«, speaks to the perennial themes of philosophy, and remains of interest to this day. But does this question entail a paradox? A significant group of analytic philosophers have indeed thought so. Since the publication of Colin Radford's celebrated paper »How Can (...)
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  21.  1
    Fraud, Fantasy, and Fiction in Environmental Writing.David W. Kidner - 2005 - Environmental Ethics 27 (4):391-410.
    During the past several decades, a number of accounts of environmental and ethnic wisdom have appeared which have later been exposed as fraudulent. The widespread popularity of these accounts should be understood as symptomatic of valid feelings and awarenesses that are unable to find expression in the modern world, and are usually dissociated from mainstream decision-making processes. As the natural order continues to be degraded, forms such as fiction which currently have relatively low status will become more important as (...)
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  22.  4
    Fiction as representation.Monroe C. Beardsley - 1981 - Synthese 46 (3):291 - 313.
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  23.  98
    Deep Indeterminacy in Physics and Fiction.George Darby, Martin Pickup & Jon Robson - 2017 - In Otávio Bueno, Steven French, George Darby & Dean Rickles (eds.), Thinking About Science, Reflecting on Art: Bringing Aesthetics and Philosophy of Science Together. New York: Routledge.
    Indeterminacy in its various forms has been the focus of a great deal of philosophical attention in recent years. Much of this discussion has focused on the status of vague predicates such as ‘tall’, ‘bald’, and ‘heap’. It is determinately the case that a seven-foot person is tall and that a five-foot person is not tall. However, it seems difficult to pick out any determinate height at which someone becomes tall. How best to account for this phenomenon is, of course, (...)
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  24.  16
    Fiction as a Base of Interpretation Contexts.Alberto Voltolini - 2006 - Synthese 153 (1):23-47.
    In this paper, I want to deal with the problem of how to find an adequate context of interpretation for indexical sentences that enables one to account for the intuitive truth-conditional content which some apparently puzzling indexical sentences like “I am not here now” as well as other such sentences contextually have. In this respect, I will pursue a fictionalist line. This line allows for shifts in interpretation contexts and urges that such shifts are governed by pretense, which has to (...)
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  25.  16
    Judgments About Fact and Fiction by Children From Religious and Nonreligious Backgrounds.Kathleen H. Corriveau, Eva E. Chen & Paul L. Harris - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (2):353-382.
    In two studies, 5- and 6-year-old children were questioned about the status of the protagonist embedded in three different types of stories. In realistic stories that only included ordinary events, all children, irrespective of family background and schooling, claimed that the protagonist was a real person. In religious stories that included ordinarily impossible events brought about by divine intervention, claims about the status of the protagonist varied sharply with exposure to religion. Children who went to church or were enrolled in (...)
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  26.  15
    Ethics, evil, and fiction.Colin McGinn - 1997 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    McGinn's latest brings together moral philosophy and literary analysis in a way that illuminates both. Setting out to enrich the domain of moral reflection by showing the value of literary texts as sources of moral illumination, McGinn starts by setting out an uncompromisingly realist ethical theory, arguing that morality is an area of objective truth and genuine knowledge. He goes on to address such subjects as the nature of goodness, evil character, and the meaning of monstrosity in the context of (...)
  27.  9
    Fiction.Alberto Voltolini & Fred Kroon - 2011 - Rivista di Estetica.
  28.  4
    Myth and Fairy Tale in Contemporary Women's Fiction.Susan Sellers - 2001 - Red Globe Press.
    Sellers explores contemporary women's rewritings of myth and fairy tale, asking why mythical paradigms continue to have such potency despite the distorted images of gender they often present. A series of readings of texts is given in illustration.
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  29.  55
    The moral psychology of fiction.Gregory Currie - 1995 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2):250 – 259.
    What can we learn from fiction? I argue that we can learn about the consequences of a certain course of action by projecting ourselves, in imagination, into the situation of the fiction's characters.
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  30.  13
    Robots beyond Science Fiction: mutual learning in human–robot interaction on the way to participatory approaches.Astrid Weiss & Katta Spiel - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (2):501-515.
    Putting laypeople in an active role as direct expert contributors in the design of service robots becomes more and more prominent in the research fields of human–robot interaction and social robotics. Currently, though, HRI is caught in a dilemma of how to create meaningful service robots for human social environments, combining expectations shaped by popular media with technology readiness. We recapitulate traditional stakeholder involvement, including two cases in which new intelligent robots were conceptualized and realized for close interaction with humans. (...)
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  31.  16
    Fiction and the suspension of disbelief.Eva Schaper - 1978 - British Journal of Aesthetics 18 (1):31-44.
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  32.  16
    Found in Translation: "New People" in Twentieth-Century Chinese Science Fiction by Jing Jiang (review).Yingying Huang - 2024 - Utopian Studies 34 (3):591-594.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Found in Translation: “New People” in Twentieth-Century Chinese Science Fiction by Jing JiangYingying HuangJing Jiang. Found in Translation: “New People” in Twentieth-Century Chinese Science Fiction. New York: Columbia University Press, 2021. 144 pp. Paperback, ISBN 9780924304941.One of the Association of Asian Studies’ Asia Shorts series, Jing Jiang’s monograph is a delightful 130-page read including notes and a bibliography. It contributes new and cross-cultural perspectives to the (...)
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  33. Filtering fact from fiction: a verification framework for social media.Alfred Hermida - 2015 - In Lawrie Zion & David Craig (eds.), Ethics for digital journalists: emerging best practices. London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
  34. Truth in fiction.David K. Lewis - 2010 - In Darragh Byrne & Max Kölbel (eds.), Arguing about language. New York: Routledge.
  35. Fiction and Fictional Worlds in Videogames.Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson - 2012 - In J. R. Sageng, T. M. Larsen & H. Fossheim (eds.), The Philosophy of Computer Games. Springer. pp. 201-18.
  36.  21
    Truth in Fiction.Richard Woodward - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (3):158-167.
    When we engage with a work of fiction we gain knowledge about what is fictionally true in that work. Our grasp of what is true in a fiction is central to our engagement with representational works of art, and to our assessments of their merits. Of course, it is sometimes difficult to determine what is fictional – it is a good question whether the main character of American Psycho is genuinely psychotic or merely delusional, for instance. (And even (...)
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  37.  13
    Fiction and the Emotions.Alex Neill - 1993 - American Philosophical Quarterly 30 (1):1 - 13.
  38.  20
    Empty Names, Fiction, and the Puzzles of Non-Existence.T. Hofweber & A. Everett (eds.) - 2000 - CSLI Publications.
    Philosophers and theorists have long been puzzled by humans' ability to talk about things that do not exist, or to talk about things that they think exist but, in fact, do not. _Empty Names, Fiction, and the Puzzles of Non-Existence_ is a collection of 13 new works concerning the semantic and metaphysical issues arising from empty names, non-existence, and the nature of fiction. The contributors include some of the most important researchers working in these fields. Some of the (...)
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  39.  6
    The fiction of Instants.Milič Čapek - 1972 - In J. T. Fraser, F. C. Haber & G. H. Mueller (eds.), The Study of Time. Springer Verlag. pp. 332--344.
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  40. Korsmeyer on Fiction and Disgust.Filippo Contesi - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):109-116.
    In Savoring Disgust, Carolyn Korsmeyer argues that disgust is peculiar amongst emotions, for it does not need any of the standard solutions to the so-called paradox of fiction. I argue that Korsmeyer’s arguments in support of the peculiarity of disgust with respect to the paradox of fiction are not successful.
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  41.  67
    Le paradoxe de la fiction: le retour.Florian Cova & Fabrice Teroni - 2015 - L'expression des Émotions: Mélanges En l'Honneur de Patrizia Lombardo.
    Tullmann et Buckwalter (2014) ont récemment soutenu que le paradoxe de la fiction tenait plus de l’illusion que de la réalité. D’après eux, les théories contemporaines des émotions ne fourniraient aucune raison d’adopter une interprétation du terme « existence » qui rende les prémisses du paradoxe incompatibles entre elles. Notre discussion a pour but de contester cette manière de dissoudre le paradoxe de la fiction en montrant qu’il ne prend pas sa source dans les théories contemporaines des émotions. (...)
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  42.  15
    Imagining and Knowing: The Shape of Fiction.Gregory Currie - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    Gregory Currie defends the view that works of fiction guide the imagination, and then considers whether fiction can also guide our beliefs. He makes a case for modesty about learning from fiction, as it is easy to be too optimistic about the psychological insights of authors, and empathy is hard to acquire while not always morally advantageous.
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  43.  19
    Fear, fiction and make-believe.Alex Neill - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (1):47-56.
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  44.  9
    Talk about fiction.Stefano Predelli - 1997 - Erkenntnis 46 (1):69-77.
    I present a novel explanation of the apparent truth of certain remarks about fiction, such as an utterance of ''Salieri commissioned the Requiem'' during a discussion of the movie Amadeus. I criticize the traditional view, which alleges that the uttered sentence abbreviates the longer sentence ''it is true in the movie Amadeus that Salieri commissioned the Requiem''. I propose a solution which appeals to some independently motivated results concerning the contexts relevant for the semantic evaluation of indexical expressions.
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  45.  11
    Against Creationism in Fiction.Takashi Yagisawa - 2001 - Noûs 35 (s15):153-172.
    Sherlock Holmes is a fictional individual. So is his favorite pipe. Our pre-theoretical intuition says that neither of them is real. It says that neither of them really, or actually, exists. It also says that there is a sense in which they do exist, namely, a sense in which they exist “in the world of” the Sherlock Holmes stories. Our pre-theoretical intuition says in general of any fictional individual that it does not actually exist but exists “in the world of” (...)
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  46.  7
    The fiction of phenomenal intentionality.Nicholas Georgalis - 2003 - Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):243-256.
    This paper argues that there is no such thing as ?phenomenal intentionality?. The arguments used by its advocates rely upon an appeal to ?what it is like? (WIL) to attend on some occasion to one?s intentional state. I argue that there is an important asymmetry in the application of the WIL phenomenon to sensory and intentional states. Advocates of ?phenomenal intentionality? fail to recognize this, but this asymmetry undermines their arguments for phenomenal intentionality. The broader issue driving the advocacy of (...)
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  47.  42
    Datafication and data fiction: Narrating data and narrating with data.Edgar Gómez Cruz & Paul Dourish - 2018 - Big Data and Society 5 (2).
    Data do not speak for themselves. Data must be narrated—put to work in particular contexts, sunk into narratives that give them shape and meaning, and mobilized as part of broader processes of interpretation and meaning-making. We examine these processes through the lens of ethnographic practice and, in particular, ethnography’s attention to narrative processes. We draw on a particular case in which digital data must be animated and narrated by different groups in order to examine broader questions of how we might (...)
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  48.  23
    Fiction and Fictionalist Reductions.Gerald Vision - 1993 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 74 (2):150--74.
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  49.  17
    Fiction and intentionality.Amie L. Thomasson - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (2):277-298.
    A good phenomenological theory must be able to account equally well for our experiences of veridical perception and hallucination, for our thoughts about universities, colors, numbers, mythical figures and more. For all of these are characteristic mental acts, and a theory of intentionality should be a theory of conscious acts in general, not just of consciousness of a specific kind of thing or of a specific kind of consciousness. In so far as phenomenology purports to be a general study of (...)
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  50.  23
    In the Mental Fiction, Mental Fictionalism is Fictitious.T. Parent - 2013 - The Monist 96 (4):605-621.
    Here I explore the prospects for fictionalism about the mental, modeled after fictionalism about possible worlds. Mental fictionalism holds that the mental states posited by folk psychology do not exist, yet that some sentences of folk psychological discourse are true. This is accomplished by construing truths of folk psychology as “truths according to the mentalistic fiction.” After formulating the view, I identify five ways that the view appears self-refuting. Moreover, I argue that this cannot be fixed by semantic ascent (...)
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