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  1. 'Metaphorically'.Ben Blumson - manuscript
    Not every metaphor can be literally paraphrased by a corresponding simile – the metaphorical meaning of ‘Juliet is the sun’, for example, is not the literal meaning of ‘Juliet is like the sun’. But every metaphor can be literally paraphrased, since if ‘metaphorically’ is prefixed to a metaphor, the result says literally what the metaphor says figuratively – the metaphorical meaning of ‘Juliet is the sun’, for example, is the literal meaning of ‘metaphorically, Juliet is the sun’.
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  2. Philosophical Pictures from Philosopher Portraits.John Dilworth - manuscript
    Portraits of Wittgenstein and Hume are used as test cases in some preliminary investigations of a new kind of philosophical picture. Such pictures are produced via a variety of visual transformations of the original portraits, with a final selection for display and discussion being based on the few results that seem to have some interesting relevance to the character or philosophical views of the philosopher in question.
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  3. Interpreting Art. [REVIEW]Szu-Yen Lin - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics.
    Sam Rose’s Interpreting Art is a short monograph about how people make sense of artworks. The book is mainly about the visual arts, although literary works are.
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  4. When Paintings Argue.Gilbert Plumer - forthcoming - Philosophy.
    My thesis is that certain non-verbal paintings such as Picasso’s GUERNICA make (simple) arguments. If this is correct and the arguments are reasonably good, it would indicate one way that non-literary art can be cognitively valuable, since argument can provide the justification needed for knowledge or understanding. The focus is on painting, but my findings seem applicable to comparable visual art forms (a sculpture is also considered). My approach largely consists of identifying pertinent features of viable literary cognitivism and then (...)
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  5. Arthur Danto’s Andy Warhol: the Embodiment of Theory in Art and the Pragmatic Turn.Stephen Snyder - forthcoming - Leitmotiv:135-151.
    Arthur Danto’s recent book, Andy Warhol, leads the reader through the story of the iconic American’s artistic life highlighted by a philosophical commentary, a commentary that merges Danto’s aesthetic theory with the artist himself. Inspired by Warhol’s Brillo Box installation, art that in Danto’s eyes was indiscernible from the everyday boxes it represented, Danto developed a theory that is able to differentiate art from non-art by employing the body of conceptual art theory manifest in what he termed the ‘artworld’. The (...)
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  6. Aesthetics and Predictive Processing: Grounds and Prospects of a Fruitful Encounter.Jacopo Frascaroli, Helmut Leder, Elvira Brattico & Sander Van de Cruys - 2024 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 379 (20220410).
    In the last few years, a remarkable convergence of interests and results has emerged between scholars interested in the arts and aesthetics from a variety of perspectives and cognitive scientists studying the mind and brain within the predictive processing (PP) framework. This convergence has so far proven fruitful for both sides: while PP is increasingly adopted as a framework for understanding aesthetic phenomena, the arts and aesthetics, examined under the lens of PP, are starting to be seen as important windows (...)
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  7. Fourfolded objects, or toward a philosophy of object-oriented curation.Jan Gresil Kahambing - 2024 - Curator: The Museum Journal 67 (2).
    This paper attempts to contextualize a philosophy of curation that is object-oriented or toward a “return to the object.” In the museum, three interrelated philosophical problems pervade curation practices that prevent access to the object as it is. Here, the subject-object relations or idealism-realism issues are reconsidered as a specific niche of the philosophy of curation. To address these issues, this paper claims that Jean-Paul Martinon and Graham Harman's philosophical return to the Heideggerian fourfold (das Geviert) can introduce creative pathways (...)
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  8. What is Meta-curation?Jan Gresil Kahambing - 2024 - Inscriptions: Journal for Contemporary Thinking on Art, Philosophy and Psycho-Analysis 7 (1):79-93.
    In this essay, I present an alternative philosophical approach to meta-curating. While the debate surrounding the meta-curating of content often centers around technology like post-digital art, I prefer to take a broader perspective and examine its ontological implications. I consider the realist or anti-realist assumptions of meta-curating through Jean Baudrillard’s concept of seduction and Giorgio Agamben’s idea of spectrality. Both simulacrum and spectrality tend to support an anti-realist approach to meta-curating where the value of the object is made fragile when (...)
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  9. Categorizing Art.Kiyohiro Sen - 2024 - Dissertation, University of Tokyo
    This dissertation examines the practice of categorizing works of art and its relationship to art criticism. How a work of art is categorized influences how it is appreciated and criticized. Being frightening is a merit for horror, but a demerit for lullabies. The brushstrokes in Monet's "Impression, Sunrise" (1874) look crude when seen as a Neoclassical painting, but graceful when seen as an Impressionist painting. Many of the judgments we make about artworks are category-dependent in this way, but previous research (...)
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  10. Order and Change in Art: Towards an Active Inference Account of Aesthetic Experience.Sander Van de Cruys, Jacopo Frascaroli & Karl Friston - 2024 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 379 (20220411).
    How to account for the power that art holds over us? Why do artworks touch us deeply, consoling, transforming or invigorating us in the process? In this paper, we argue that an answer to this question might emerge from a fecund framework in cognitive science known as predictive processing (a.k.a. active inference). We unpack how this approach connects sense-making and aesthetic experiences through the idea of an ‘epistemic arc’, consisting of three parts (curiosity, epistemic action and aha experiences), which we (...)
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  11. Interpreting Dwarf Fortress: Finitude, Absurdity, and Narrative.James Cartlidge - 2023 - Games and Culture 1 (OnlineFirst).
    This paper interprets the influential colony management simulator ‘Dwarf Fortress’ existentially, in terms of finitude, absurdity, and narrative. It applies Aarseth/Möring’s proposed method of game interpretation, adopting their definition of ‘cybermedia’ as a generalized game ontology, then providing a specialized ontology of ‘Dwarf Fortress’ which describes its genre and salient gameplay features, incorporating Ian Bogost’s concept of ‘procedural rhetoric’. It then gives an existentialist interpretation of ‘Dwarf Fortress’ which centres on ‘finitude’, ‘absurdity’, and ‘narrative’, showing that ‘Dwarf Fortress’ is a (...)
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  12. Value of Art.Harry Drummond - 2023 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The Value of Art Philosophical discourse concerning the value of art is a discourse concerning what makes an artwork valuable qua its being an artwork. Whereas the concern of the critic is what makes the artwork a good artwork, the question for the aesthetician is why it is a good artwork. When we refer to … Continue reading Value of Art →.
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  13. How to tame your Feyerabend. [REVIEW]Michael T. Stuart - 2023 - Metascience 32 (2):173-176.
    This is a book review of Karim Bschir and Jamie Shaw (eds.); Interpreting Feyerabend: critical essays. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021, 290 pp, $99.99 HB.
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  14. The Implied Designer of Digital Games.Nele Van de Mosselaer & Stefano Gualeni - 2023 - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 60 (1):71-89.
    As artefacts, the worlds of digital games are designed and developed to fulfil certain expressive, functional, and experiential objectives. During play, players infer these purposes and aspirations from various aspects of their engagement with the gameworld. Influenced by their sociocultural backgrounds, sensitivities, gameplay preferences, and familiarity with game conventions, players construct a subjective interpretation of the intentions with which they believe the digital game in question was created. By analogy with the narratological notion of the implied author, we call the (...)
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  15. Domestic Hybrids: Vitruvius’ Xenia, the Surrealist’s Minotaure, and Shrigley’s Octopus.Simon Weir - 2023 - Open Philosophy 6 (1).
    The domestic spaces of the built environment are traditionally associated with residential architecture. But the domestic spaces can also extend out, metaphorically, into familiar public spaces in which one may feel at home, and also extend inwards into self-perception, insofar as you may say that you dwell within yourself. This article begins by recalling Vitruvius’ fundamental notion of architectural utilitas concerns accommodating not a building’s owners but foreigners and strange outsiders. Vitruvius’ view on utility heavily favoured architecture’s socio-political function, and (...)
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  16. Aesthetics: 50 Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Thought Experiments.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2023 - New York: Routledge.
    Aesthetics: 50 Puzzles, Paradoxes, and Thought Experiments is a teaching-focused resource, which highlights the contributions that imaginative scenarios—paradoxes, puzzles, and thought experiments alike—have made to the development of contemporary analytic aesthetics. The book is divided into sections pertaining to art-making, ontology, aesthetic judgements, appreciation and interpretation, and ethics and value, and offers an accessible summary of ten debates falling under each section. -/- Each entry also features a detailed annotated bibliography, making it an ideal companion for courses surveying a broad (...)
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  17. Art and the Working Class.Alexander Bogdanov & Genovese Taylor R. - 2022 - Iskra Books. Translated by Taylor R. Genovese.
    Appearing for the first time in English, Art and the Working Class is the work of Alexander Bogdanov, a revolutionary polymath and co-founder, with Vladimir Lenin, of the Bolshevik faction of the Russian Social Democratic Labor Party. Bogdanov was a strong proponent of the arts, co-founding the Proletarian Culture (Proletkult) organization to provide political and artistic education to workers. In this book, Bogdanov discusses the origins of art, its class characteristics, and how it might be created within a revolutionary socialist (...)
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  18. Reading Into It or Hearing It Out? Cavell on Modernism and the Art Critic's Hermeneutical Risk.Robert Engelman - 2022 - In Greg Chase, Juliet Floyd & Sandra Laugier (eds.), Cavell's Must We Mean What We Say? at 50. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 121-134.
    In this essay, I examine how Cavell's discussion of the challenges and attendant risks faced by artworks to be genuine rather than "fraudulent" informs his discussion of the challenges and attendant risks faced by art critics to offer interpretations rather than misinterpretations of artworks. Moreover, I clarify how this relation between Cavell's philosophy of art and his philosophy of criticism is mediated by his discussion of modernism. For Cavell, modernism does not so much introduce challenges for artworks as exacerbate them. (...)
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  19. The Expressive Import of Degradation and Decay in Contemporary Art.Sherri Irvin - 2022 - In Peter Miller & Soon Kai Poh (eds.), Conserving Active Matter. Bard Graduate Center - Cultura. pp. 65-79.
    Many contemporary artworks include active matter along with rules for conservation that are designed to either facilitate or prevent that matter’s degradation or decay. I discuss the mechanisms through which actual or potential states of material decay contribute to the work’s expressive import. Nelson Goodman and Catherine Elgin introduce the concepts of literal and metaphorical exemplification, which are critical to expression: a work literally exemplifies a property when it both possesses and highlights that property, and it metaphorically exemplifies a property (...)
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  20. Immaterial: Rules in Contemporary Art.Sherri Irvin - 2022 - Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary art can seem chaotic: it may be made of toilet paper, candies you can eat, or meat that is thrown out after each exhibition. Some works fill a room with obsessively fabricated objects, while others purport to include only concepts, thoughts, or language. Immaterial argues that, despite these unruly appearances, making rules is a key part of what many contemporary artists do when they make their works, and these rules can explain disparate developments in installation art, conceptual art, time-based (...)
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  21. Will a Haiyan Museum Heal or Traumatise? Insights from Survivor-Curators.Jan Gresil Kahambing - 2022 - Museological Review 26 (1):55-65.
    To commemorate the tragic event of Super Typhoon Yolanda (International Name: Haiyan) last 2013, local leaders of the province of Leyte, Philippines, are speculating on establishing a Haiyan Museum in 2023, a decade later. With connotations of ‘dark tourism’, one way to look at the speculative decade-inspired establishment is through Amy Sodaro’s ‘memorial museums’ with the purpose of ‘education-based memorialization.’ Juxtaposing this with Paul Morrow’s philosophical perception of objects in memorial museums as possible provocateurs of repulsive feelings, there is a (...)
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  22. Olafur Eliasson, The weather project.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2022 - Bloomsbury Contemporary Aesthetics.
    We might wonder whether there is a difference between experiencing an artwork and simply daydreaming. If the latter, would it be a matter of art communicating something or simply providing a backdrop for personal reverie? According to some influential key texts in philosophy, there is a difference. And it matters because our capacity for communicating the kind of thing art communicates, is a capacity linked to the possibility of not feeling alienated from the world and each other. In this chapter (...)
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  23. L'auctorialité et la transfiguration de l'expérience esthétique.Clarisse Michaux - 2022 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 119 (3):489–511.
    Why should one go to see works of art if one can look at faces in clouds and other somewhat more complex forms in tarmac? Does my aesthetic experience discover something unprecedented when it takes products of human Intentionality as substrate rather than “natural objects” supposedly lacking all Intentionality? These questions raise that of the contribution of authorship in the framework of aesthetic experience ; they question the role of the author from one of a number of possible points of (...)
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  24. Quinhonk: Photography & Photographic Installations.Yang Immanuel Pachankis - 2022 - USA: Independently published.
    The hardcover version of the book Astrophotography: Concepts and Flows focuses only on the semiotics of art other than any technicalities covered in the Kindle eBook and paperback versions. With the arrangements in the concept of art and nuclear chemistry in its ecological terms conveyed in the meanings in art, the book is a selected series of the artworks in the photographic and installation art.
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  25. Not all art is beautiful (and that’s good).Venkat Ramanan - 2022 - Blue Labyrinths 1.
    Is aesthetics only about art that is beautiful as conventionally understood? If not, what purpose does art that may not be so serve?
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  26. The Normate: On Disability, Critical Phenomenology, and Merleau-Ponty’s Cézanne.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2022 - Chiasmi International: Trilingual Studies Concerning Merleau-Ponty's Thought 24:199-218.
    In the essay “Cézanne’s Doubt,” Merleau-Ponty explores the relationship between Paul Cézanne’s art and his embodiment. The doubt in question is ultimately about the meaning of his disabilities. Should Cézanne’s disabilities or impairments shape how we interpret his art or should they instead be treated as incidental, as mere biographical data? Although Merleau-Ponty's essay isn’t intended to be phenomenological, its line of questioning is as much about lived experience as it is about art criticism, art history, and aesthetics. I here (...)
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  27. Retrievals of the Lost Past: Jewish Mysticism and Cinema.Milad Roshani Payan - 2022 - Triple Ampersand (Andand&).
    In common sense, history is considered as a series of events that follow one another in a one-dimensional, irreversible, and forward-looking direction. This is the familiar understanding that considers history as chronological. In this case, which requires imagining a timeline, past events are separated from future events by the present moment. Each of the events that took place in the past becomes inaccessible and turns into a lost past. The logical consequence of this approach is that the past does not (...)
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  28. An Institutional Theory of Art Categories.Kiyohiro Sen - 2022 - Debates in Aesthetics 18 (1):31-43.
    It is widely acknowledged that categories play significant roles in the appreciation of artworks. This paper argues that the correct categories of artworks are institutionally established through social processes. Section 1 examines the candidates for determining correct categories and proposes that this question should shift the focus from category membership to appreciative behaviour associated with categories. Section 2 draws on Francesco Guala’s theory of institutions to show that categories of artworks are established as rules-in-equilibrium. Section 3 reviews the explanatory benefits (...)
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  29. Trust and the appreciation of art.Daniel Abrahams & Gary Kemp - 2021 - Ratio 35 (2):133-145.
    Does trust play a significant role in the appreciation of art? If so, how does it operate? We argue that it does, and that the mechanics of trust operate both at a general and a particular level. After outlining the general notion of ‘art-trust’—the notion sketched is consistent with most notions of trust on the market—and considering certain objections to the model proposed, we consider specific examples to show in some detail that the experience of works of art, and the (...)
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  30. Fantaisies architecturales chez Iakov Tchernikhov : surpasser la mimèsis à travers la phantasia comme agent du progrès.Marianna Charitonidou - 2021 - Nouvelle Revue d'Esthétique 27 (1):131-143.
    L’article examine les « compositions » de Tchernikhov en liant sa recherche constante de nouvelles formes à la capacité de convertir les « fantaisies » en représentations. Contrairement à Aristote, qui conçoit la mimèsis comme l’équivalent de l’entreprise artistique, Tchernikhov perçoit ses « compositions » comme des actes de dépassement de la mimèsis par la phantasia. Les illustrations visionnaires de ses Fantaisies architecturales expriment son intention de remplacer les mots par des images graphiques. Son approche est fondée sur la croyance (...)
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  31. The Right to Be: Wallace Stevens and Martin Heidegger on Thinking and Poetizing.Frederick M. Dolan - 2021 - In Florian Grosser & Nassima Sahraoui (eds.), Heidegger in the Literary World: Variations on Poetic Thinking (New Heidegger Research). pp. 127-140.
    If Martin Heidegger was a philosopher who poetized, Wallace Stevens was a poet who philosophized. In "The Sail of Ulysses," one of his later poems, Stevens speaks enigmatically of a "right to be." The phrase is straightforward, if taken to indicate the right to life. But Stevens is rarely, if ever, straightforward. The poem is much more understandable if we take "being" in a Heideggerian sense, as an understanding of what it means to be.
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  32. Il realismo segnico nella rappresentazione della metamorfosi: Deleuze e la fenomenologia.Elia Gonnella - 2021 - Segni E Comprensione 101:84-110.
    Metamorphosis as it is represented by some pre-historical artists seems problematic for our occidental point of view. In fact, it seems to be strongly against identity and law of non-contradiction. Becoming in general is also viewed as an error or exception by our classic point of view. This very claim can conduct to theories of non-classical logic. Deleuze and Guattari in their monumental work had tried to offer enormous contributions in order to comprehend the becoming phenomenon. Through a pre-historical representations (...)
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  33. Industrial Modernism and the Hegelian Dialectic in Winslow Homer.Trevor Griffith - 2021 - Labyrinth: An International Journal for Philosophy, Value Theory and Sociocultural Hermeneutics 23 (1):166-183.
    This paper looks at the themes of nature, humanity, and military and industrial development in the nineteenth century American painter Winslow Homer through the lens of the Hegelian theory of art. Robert Pippin's After the Beautiful has recently put the Hegelian framework to very fruitful use in understanding pictorial modernism. This study of Homer follows a similar approach but argues that Homer's canvases represent a development in the modern spirt which, in many ways, goes beyond the canvases of Manet – (...)
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  34. “Aesthetic Ideas”: Mystery and Meaning in the Early Work of Barrie Kosky.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2021 - In James Phillips & John Severn (eds.), Barrie Kosky’s Transnational Theatres. New York, NY, USA: Springer. pp. 59-80.
    In this chapter I invite the reader to consider the philosophical assumptions which underpin the early career aims and objectives of Barrie Kosky. A focus will be his “language” of opera, and the processes by which the audience is prompted to interpret it. The result will be to see how Kosky creates mystery and meaning while avoiding fantasy and escapism; and can express psychological truth while stimulating subjective interpretations. The point will be to show that Kosky’s oeuvre demonstrates a central (...)
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  35. Aesthetic Archaeology.Jakub Stejskal - 2021 - Critical Inquiry 48 (1):144-166.
    The article’s aim is to clear the ground for the idea of aesthetic archaeology as an aesthetic analysis of remote artifacts divorced from aesthetic criticism. On the example of controversies surrounding the early Cycladic figures, it discusses an anxiety motivating the rejection of aesthetic inquiry in archaeology, namely, the anxiety about the heuristic reliability of one’s aesthetic instincts vis-à-vis remote artifacts. It introduces the claim that establishing an aesthetic mandate of a remote artifact should in the first place be part (...)
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  36. Can art become theoretical?Clinton Peter Verdonschot - 2021 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Philosophische Anthropologie 11 (1):109-126.
    Art-science, as its name suggests, combines art with science. The idea of combining art and science raises the question whether the outcome, art-scientific works, can succeed against a standard properly belonging to them. In other words: can there be such a thing as an art-scientific work, or do such works merely belong to either art or science while superficially seeming to belong to the other sphere as well? Surprisingly perhaps, these concerns overlap with a chief point of contention as regards (...)
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  37. Euclid's Error: The Mathematics behind Foucault, Deleuze, and Nietzsche.Ilexa Yardley - 2021 - Intelligent Design Center.
    We have to go all the way back to Euclid, and, actually, before, to figure out the basis for representation, and therefore, interpretation. Which is, pure and simple, the conservation of a circle. As articulated by Foucault, Deleuze, and Nietzsche. 'Pi' (in mathematics) is the background state for everything (a.k.a. 'mind').Providing the explanation for (and the current popularity, and, thus, the 'genius' behind) NFT (non fungible tokens). 'Reality' has, finally, caught up with the 'truth.'.
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  38. Materials and Meaning in Contemporary Sculpture.Sherri Irvin - 2020 - In Kristin Gjesdal, Fred Rush & Ingvild Torsen (eds.), Philosophy of Sculpture: Historical Problems, Contemporary Approaches. Routledge. pp. 165-186.
    An extensive literature about pictorial representation discusses what is involved when a two-dimensional image represents some specific object or type of object. A smaller literature addresses parallel issues in sculptural representation. But little has been said about the role played by the sculptural material itself in determining the meanings of the sculptural work. Appealing to Nelson Goodman and Catherine Elgin’s discussions of literal and metaphorical exemplification, I argue that the material of which a sculpture is constituted plays key roles in (...)
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  39. Art, Intention, and Everyday Psychology.Joshua Landy - 2020 - Nonsite 1 (32).
    Responding to a set of essays by Walter Benn Michaels, this paper argues that we can solve some interesting puzzles about intention in photography without the need for any fancy Anscombian footwork. Three distinctions are enough to do the job. First, with Alexander Nehamas, we should separate the empirical photographer from the postulated artist. Next we should mark off generic intentions (such as the intention to make a work of art) from specific intentions (such as the intention to critique capitalism). (...)
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  40. Assemblage du paradigme proto-esthétique aux Amériques.Frédéric Lefrançois - 2020 - Recherches 1 (25):143-153.
    This paper focuses on the conception of an endogenous aesthetic matrix in the Caribbean and the Americas within a decolonial perspective.
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  41. A Dilemma for Modest Actual Intentionalism.Szu-Yen Lin - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (2):165-181.
    Modest actual intentionalism is a major position on interpretation in contemporary analytic aesthetics. The position consists of a disjunctive formulation according to which work-meaning is determined by the author’s intention when such intention succeeds or by non-intentionalistic factors when it fails. I challenge the disjunctive view by presenting a constructive dilemma, the conclusion being that modest actual intentionalism ends up either making non-intentionalistic factors idle or making authorial intent superfluous.
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  42. Aesthetic Truth Through the Ages: A Lonerganian Theory of Art History.Ryan Michael Miller - 2020 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 94:139-151.
    Classical authors were generally artistic realists. The predominant aesthetic theory was mimesis, which saw the truth of art as its successful representation of reality. High modernists rejected this aesthetic theory as lifeless, seeing the truth of art as its subjective expression. This impasse has serious consequences for both the Church and the public square. Moving forward requires both, first, an appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of the high modernist critique of classical mimetic theory, and, second, a theory of truth (...)
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  43. The World and the Will: On the Problem of Photographic Agency.John Schwenkler - 2020 - Nonsite 32.
    This essay is my contribution to a symposium responding to several papers by Walter Benn Michaels that bring the work of Elizabeth Anscombe to bear on philosophical problems of artistic representation. In it, I take Benn Michaels's side in a dispute with Dominic McIver Lopes over the difference between Anscombe's view of intentional agency and that of Donald Davidson. I also critique Benn Michaels's reading of a difficult passage in section 29 of Anscombe's INTENTION, where she presents the famous case (...)
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  44. The sublime Clara Mather.Kenneth Walden - 2020 - In Hans Maes (ed.), Portraits and Philosophy. New York, NY: Routledge.
    Kant says that there is a close affinity between the sublime and moral feelings of respect. This suggests a relatively unexplored way that aesthetic experience could be morally improving. We could come to respect persons by experiencing them as sublime. Unfortunately, this is not at all our ordinary experience of people, and it’s not clear how one would come to it. In this paper I argue that this possibility is realized in the portraits of Thomas Eakins. Through a handful of (...)
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  45. José Matias de Eça de Queiroz — ou as Reflexões de Um Professor de Filosofia (da Vontade de Saber à Ironia: Um Retrato Oblíquo da Falência do Panlogismo).Eurico Carvalho - 2019 - Portuguese Studies Review (PSR) 27 (2):123-172.
    This paper intends to validate the hermeneutic relevance of three core theses: José Matias (i) is demonstrably an “open work”, (ii) it constitutes a philosophical short story and (iii) it illustrates the failure of panlogism. With regard to the first thesis, it is necessary to concede up front that this interpretation of José Matias does not purport to be unique nor does it encompass the richness of the work’s content. Yet, given the second thesis, the paper intends to defy the (...)
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  46. When Art Can’t Lie.Brandon Cooke - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (3):259-271.
    Pre-philosophically, an artwork can lie in virtue of some authorial intention that the audience comes to accept as true something that the author believes to be false. This thought forces a confrontation with the debate about the relation between the interpretation of a work and the intentions of its author. Anti-intentionalist theories of artwork meaning, which divorce work meaning from the actual author’s intentions, cannot license the judgment that an artwork lies. But if artwork lying is a genuine possibility, then (...)
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  47. Is There a Problem of Writing in Historiography? Plato and the pharmakon of the Written Word.Natan Elgabsi - 2019 - Metodo. International Studies in Phenomenology and Philosophy 7 (2):225-264.
    This investigation concerns first what Jacques Derrida and Paul Ricœur consider to be «the question of writing» in Plato’s Phaedrus, and then whether their conception of a general philosophical problem of writing finds support in the dialogue. By contrast to their attempts to «determine» the «status» of writing as the general condition of knowledge, my investigation has two objections. (1) To show that Plato’s concern is not to define writing, but to reflect on what is involved in honest and dishonest (...)
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  48. Extreme Intentionalism Modestly Modified.Mitchell Green - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (2):197-201.
    1. On at least one usage of ‘mean’, performing an action that leads someone else to think that P, is not, on its own, sufficient for meaning that P. Nor is performing an action that is intended to get someone to think this. Instead one must make one’s intention overt. Grice’s way of developing this overtness requirement requires audience-directed intentions: for an agent, on this approach, to mean that P, she must perform a publicly accessible action with the intention of (...)
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  49. Imagination Minimalized.Amy Kind - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (2):215-218.
    In Only Imagine, Kathleen Stock defends a theory of fictional content she calls extreme intentionalism. Roughly put, this view holds that the fictional content of a text is determined solely by its author’s intention. What is true in a given work of fiction gets fixed by what the author of that fiction intends a reader to imagine.
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  50. Only Imagine? Not Necessarily.Ruth Lorand - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (2):211-214.
    In her recent book, Only Imagine, Kathleen Stock promotes extreme intentionalism with respect to fictional content. She writes, ‘the fictional content of a particular text is equivalent to exactly what the author of the text intended the reader to imagine’. There are at least three separate points here: the author’s intentions determine the fictional content; the fictional content is identical with the content of what the reader imagines; reading fiction necessarily entails imagining. The first two points are normative; they are (...)
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