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Kyle Novak
University of Guelph
  1. Thinking as Folding: Deleuze’s Leibnizian Nomadology as a Non-Ontological Approach to Posthumanist Subjectivity.Kyle Novak - forthcoming - Philosophy Today.
    Rosi Braidotti has recently argued that the emerging scholarship on posthumanism should employ that she calls nomadic thinking. Braidotti identifies Deleuze’s work on Spinoza as the genesis of posthumanist ontology, yet Deleuze’s claims about nomadic thinking or nomadology come from his work on Leibniz. I argue that for posthumanist thought to theorize subjectivity beyond the human, it must use nomadology to overcome ontology itself. To make my argument, I demonstrate that while Braidotti is correct about Spinoza’s influence on Deleuze, his (...)
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  2.  28
    Deleuze's Transcendental Empiricism Against Speculative Realism: How Deleuze's Hume Avoids the Challenge of Correlationism.Kyle Novak - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (3):297-308.
    In this article I argue that Gilles Deleuze's reading of David Hume in his early work Empiricism and Subjectivity avoids the central claim made by speculative realists that all post-Kantian philosophy suffers from what they call correlationism. My claim is not that Deleuze's reading of Hume produces a non-correlationist ontology, but that it leads him to a non-ontological constructivist philosophy. In Deleuze's terms, this produces a transcendental empiricism of "thinking with AND, instead of thinking IS, instead of thinking for IS."1I (...)
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  3. We Still Do Not Know What a Body Can Do: Rereading Deleuze's Spinozist Ethology Toward a Non-Ontological Interpretation of Transcendental Empiricism.Kyle Novak - forthcoming - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale.
    Throughout much of his career, Deleuze repeats a problem he attributes to Spinoza: “we do not even know what a body can do.” The problem is closely associated with Deleuze’s parallelist reading of Spinoza and what he calls ethology. In this article, I argue that Deleuze takes ethology to be a new model for philosophy which he intends to replace ontology. I ground my claim in Deleuze’s suggestion that Spinoza offers philosophers the means of thinking “with AND rather than thinking (...)
     
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  4. Fake News and Ecstatic Truths: Alternative Facts in Lessons of Darkness.Kyle Novak - 2020 - In M. Blake Wilson & Christopher Turner (eds.), The Philosophy of Werner Herzog. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: Rowman & Littlefield.
    This chapter draws a connection between Herzog’s falsified epigraph to Lessons of Darkness and Kellyanne Conway’s claim that there are “alternative facts”. Philosophers have a commitment to the truth, but in cases like Herzog’s quote or Trump’s inauguration it’s very easy to fact-check. Being a good citizen may require that from us, but doing so leaves little to resolve philosophically. Thus, if Herzog raises a question about finding truth in an age of “alt-facts” and “fake news”, then it must be (...)
     
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    We Still Do Not Know What a Body Can Do.Kyle Novak - 2021 - Symposium 25 (2):75-97.
    Throughout much of his career, Deleuze repeats a problem he attributes to Spinoza: “we do not even know what a body can do.” The problem is closely associated with Deleuze’s parallelist reading of Spinoza and what he calls ethology. In this article, I argue that Deleuze takes ethology to be a new model for philosophy which he intends to replace ontology. I ground my claim in Deleuze’s sugges-tion that Spinoza offers philosophers the means of “thinking with AND” rather than “thinking (...)
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