Afterlife

Edited by K. Mitch Hodge (Masaryk University, Queen's University, Belfast)
About this topic
Summary The afterlife, or more specifically the belief in an afterlife, is the belief that it is possible for individuals to survive death.  Scholarly discussions of afterlife beliefs cover a broad range of academic disciplines (e.g., philosophy, religious studies, anthropology and psychology) and philosophically relevant topics (e.g., personal identity, epistemology of religious belief, imagination, ethics, arguments from parapsychology, dualism and materialism).  Beliefs in the afterlife are generally one of two types: metaphysically thin, whereby the some non-identity conferring substance of the individual continues after the death of his/her physical body (e.g., their atoms, or their life force or energy is redistributed into the universe to make up other things); or metaphysically thick, whereby some essential personal identity conferring essence or substance (e.g., the person’s soul , mind or resurrected body) is said to survive either immediately after death, or at some later time.  Most scholarly discussions as well as most religio-cultural systems are concerned with the latter rather than the former.  Metaphysically thick afterlife beliefs usually take one of two forms: reincarnation (also known in the philosophical literature as transmigration of the soul), by which the individual is reborn into this world with a new life, or the individual continues his/her existence in a spiritual realm (e.g., heaven, hell, or the realm of ancestors).  How, and whether, personal identity can be maintained in an afterlife has a long history of debate in philosophy.  In addition, one cross-culturally common and philosophically important element of metaphysically thick afterlife beliefs is that the individual is rewarded or punished for his/her moral propriety or moral transgressions that he/she committed in this life. 
Key works Philosophical discussions of the afterlife date back to Pythagoras unknown and Plato 2008, 1975,  both of whom argued for the transmigration of the soul.  With a rise of Christianity in the West, discussions concerning the afterlife shifted to how personal identity was maintained in the afterlife, especially given the doctrine of the resurrection of the body (see, Sorabji 2006, and Barresi manuscript).  After Descartes 1984 [1641], however, the emphasis in philosophy shifted away from survival after death in a resurrected body, to the idea that one survives death as a disembodied mind.  The modern era saw the first substantial skeptical challenge to belief in an afterlife with Coleman 2007, ms.  Contemporary philosophical discussions of the afterlife have focused on the possibility of disembodied existence and how this is to be understood (see Blose 1981, Gillett 1985, 1986, Tye 1983, Hick 1976, 1973, Swinburne 1986, Mavrodes 1977, Penelhum 1982, and Perry 1977).  In addition, with the rise of the cognitive science of religion, and experimental evidence (see Bering 2006) that humans intuitively believe in an afterlife, philosophical debate has begun on how and why the human mind is predisposed toward this belief, and the role the imagination, emotions and concepts play in representing the deceased and the afterlife (see Bek & Lock 2011, Paul & Rita 2006, Nichols 2007 and Hodge 2011, 2011).
Introductions Encyclopedia articles include Hasker 2010Andrade 2011 (on immortality).  Good introductory books to the topics dealing with the afterlife include: Corcoran 2001, Benatar 2004, Sorabji 2006, and Barresi manuscript.
Related categories

1978 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 1978
Material to categorize
  1. Mechanism for Awareness after Death 12 23 2022.Paul Merriam - manuscript
    The only processes that could correlate to awareness thatgo on after brain-death are quantum processes. These processes contain information. But in quantum mechanics information is never lost. Therefore this information goes on after death and the awareness will still be correlated to it. Therefore awareness goes on after death.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Afterlife Dilemma.Marlowe Kerring - manuscript
    This article is meant to provide a brief, accessible introduction to the Afterlife Dilemma--an argument challenging a popular Christian pro-life position. A more in-depth and nuanced treatment of the argument can be found in “The Afterlife Dilemma: A Problem for the Christian Pro-Life Movement,” published in the Journal of Controversial Ideas 2(2) (2022), available online.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. How African Conceptions of the Afterlife Bear on Life’s Meaning.Thaddeus Metz - forthcoming - In Ada Agada, Aribiah Attoe & Jonathan Chimakonam (eds.), Emerging Trends and Questions in African Philosophy of Religion.
    Up to now, nearly all the work in the religious philosophy of life’s meaning and the axiology of theism has presumed a conception of an afterlife that is Abrahamic. In contrast, in this article I critically discuss some of the desirable and undesirable facets of Traditional African Religion’s salient conceptions of the afterlife as they bear on meaning in life. Given an interest in a maximally meaningful life, and supposing meaning would come from living beyond the death of this body, (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The afterlife of fictional media violence. A genetic phenomenology of emotions following Husserl and Freud.Christian Ferencz-Flatz - 2022 - Continental Philosophy Review 55 (3):289-308.
    Ever since the 1960s, media and communication studies have abounded in heated debates concerning the psychological and social effects of fictional media violence. Massive empirical research has first tried to tie film violence to cultivating either fear or aggressive tendencies among its viewership, while later research has focused on other media as well (television, video games). The present paper does not aim to settle the factual question of whether or not medial experiences indeed engender real emotional dispositions. Instead, it brings (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Correction to: The afterlife of fictional media violence. A genetic phenomenology of emotions following Husserl and Freud.Christian Ferencz-Flatz - 2022 - Continental Philosophy Review 55 (3):309-309.
  6. Scenes of subjection’ & subjectivity : punishment, torture, captivity, annihilation and genocide of (queer) black girls and women in the ‘afterlife of slavery.Peace And Love El Henson - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Texas at Austin
    This article explores black girls and women’s experiences with school, police and state disciplinary torture in the ‘afterlife of slavery.’ More precisely, this work explores the punishment, torture, captivity, annihilation and ultimate genocide black girls and women are subjected to by white supremacist, antiblack, hetero-patriarchal, hetero-sexist, and heteronormative school staff, police and state forces in public schools and beyond. A few research questions are explored: What are black girls and women’s experiences with punishment, torture, captivity, annihilation and genocide by police (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Afterlife.Eric Steinhart - 2021 - In S. Goetz and C. Taliaferro (ed.), Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Philosophy of Religion. Malden, MA, USA: pp. 1-6.
    Ancient theories of life after death involve souls and gods. Reincarnation theories say an immortal soul travels from one mortal body to another. Lives are shaped by karmic laws, which may be retributive or progressive. Resurrection theories say that persons are bodies. After you die, God will revive your body, or reassemble it from its atoms, or recover it from information stored in the divine memory or your soul, or replicate it in another universe. Modern afterlife theories rely heavily on (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. A Naturalistic Afterlife: Evolution, Ordinary Existence, Eternity.David Harmon - 2017 - Cham: Imprint: Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book provides a fresh look at one of the most enduring, absorbing, and universal questions human beings face: What happens to us after we die? In secular thought, the standard answer is simple: we disappear into oblivion. David Harmon takes us in a different direction, by making the case that a nonconscious portion of our personality survives death-literally, not figuratively-and explains how this kind of naturalistic afterlife can be emotionally relevant to us while we are still living. Combining insights (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Anti‐abortion strategizing and the afterlife of the Geneva Consensus Declaration.Lynn Morgan - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    The Geneva Consensus Declaration, introduced by the Trump-Pence administration in 2020 and signed by thirty-two countries, claims that there is no international right to abortion. Although the Declaration was subsequently repudiated by the Biden administration, it did not die. This paper traces the afterlife of the Geneva Consensus Declaration as part of an ongoing antiabortion strategy to form a global coalition. Its supporters hope to mobilize signing nations to remove sexual and reproductive rights from the agendas of multilateral agencies including (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Race in the Afterlife: An Eastern Christian Approach.Nathan Placencia - 2022 - In Joshua Matthan Brown & James Siemens (eds.), Eastern Christian Approaches to Philosophy. London: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 281-301.
    In a previous paper, I addressed the question: Will there be races in heaven? (Placencia, 2021 ). There I argued that the answer to that question depends on one’s view of heaven and one’s account of race. After sorting out these concepts, I defended the conclusion that racial identity, but not race, is compatible with the mainstream Christian account of the afterlife. However, I left open the question of whether deflationary realist races (what I will refer to as minimalist races (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Tracing an intellectual afterlife in library and archival sources : Raymond Klibansky and his Warburg Library networks.Jillian Tomm - 2018 - In Philippe Despoix & Jillian Tomm (eds.), Raymond Klibansky and the Warburg Library Network: Intellectual Peregrinations From Hamburg to London and Montreal. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Illuminating Jewish thought: explorations of free will, the afterlife, and the Messianic era.Netanel Wiederblank - 2018 - New Milford, CT: Maggid Books.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The philosophy of death reader: cross-cultural readings on immortality and the afterlife.Markar Melkonian (ed.) - 2019 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Look Back in Angst: Akaler Sandhaney, the Indian New Wave, and the Afterlife of the IPTA Movement.Manishita Dass - 2021 - In Sanjukta Sunderason & Lotte Hoek (eds.), Forms of the left in postcolonial South Asia: aesthetics, networks and connected histories. Bloomsbury Academic.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The Afterlife of Moses: Exile, Democracy, Renewal.Michael P. Steinberg - 2022
    Moses and modernism -- Under Lincoln's eyes -- Hannah Arendt crosses the Atlantic -- Yaron Ezrahi : democracy and the post-epic nation.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Afterlife.Raymond J. VanArragon - 2022 - In Mark A. Lamport (ed.), The Rowman & Littlefield Handbook of Philosophy and Religion. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Immortal animals, subtle bodies, or separated souls: the afterlife in Leibniz, Wolff, and their followers.Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero - forthcoming - Intellectual History Review.
    In eighteenth-century post-Leibnizian German philosophy, the debate on immortality did not concern only the fate of the soul after death but also the fate of the body. Leibniz had famously maintained that no animal ever dies, for the soul is never entirely deprived of its living body. In spite of Bilfinger’s almost isolated defense, this doctrine never became dominant, even among Leibniz’s followers. Christian Wolff, long considered a mere popularizer of Leibniz’s philosophy, departed from this account of immortality and replaced (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. The Beatification Story of Irene Mary & Derrick Taylor.Irene Mary Taylor & Derrick Taylor - 2022 - Preston: Cometanica.
    The initial foundations to the notion that Cometan's grandparents, Irene Mary Taylor and Derrick Taylor, should be recognised for their life as laypeople in the Roman Catholic Church first emerged in January 2020 and October 2021 respectively. Irene Mary was well known for her devotion to Catholicism among her family and acquaintances, yet Cometan saw in her icon and life events an opportunity to reinvigorate Catholic fervour in England and abroad. In his own endeavour as a religious figure and philosopher (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Next World: Extraordinary Experiences of the Afterlife by Gregory Shushan.Michael Grosso - 2022 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 36 (2).
    Our culture allows us to quantify death with precise statistics. We know that at least a million Americans so far have lost their lives to Covid-19. We have the daily numbers of mass killings in the United States; of those killed at the hands of Vladimir Putin’s criminal war; of deaths due to starvation, specific diseases, obesity, psychosis, suicide, and so on. There are new technologies that claim they will be able to predict exactly when we will die from natural (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Not So Fast: A Response to Augustine’s Critique of the BICS Contest.Stephen Braude, Imants Barušs, Arnaud Delorme, Dean Radin & Helané Wahbeh - 2022 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 36 (2):399-411.
    Keith Augustine’s critical evaluation of the essay contest sponsored by the Bigelow Institute of Consciousness Studies (BICS) is an interesting but problematic review. It mixes reasonable and detailed criticisms of the contest and many of the winning essays with a disappointing reliance on some of the most trite and superficial criticisms of parapsychological research. Ironically, Augustine criticizes the winning essays for using straw-man arguments and cherry-picked evidence even though many of his own arguments commit these same errors.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. Beyond the BICS Essay Contest: Envisioning a More Rigorous Preregistered Survival Study.Etienne LeBel, Keith Augustine & Adam Rock - 2022 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 36 (2):436-447.
    Prior experimental studies of anomalous information reception (AIR) have been touted as strong evidence for postmortem survival of consciousness yet are plagued by several methodological weaknesses that preclude clear evidence of positive results. The present team provides an adversarial collaboration to identify and compensate for the major limitations of these previous approaches. We outline a more rigorous preregistered study design that eliminates or minimizes researcher bias in (a) data cleaning and (b) statistical analysis. Obtaining positive results with our recommended design (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. When Will Survival Researchers Move Past Defending the Indefensible?Keith Augustine - 2022 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 36 (2):412-435.
    The failure of five psychical researchers to confront my critique of Bigelow Institute contest-winning essays with counterpoints or concessions responsive to its novel criticisms is disappointing. Their defensive and scattershot reply lost sight of whether the critiqued essays met their directive to provide "hard evidence 'beyond a reasonable doubt'" of the survival of human consciousness. In the critique I also questioned the scientific validity of seeking ostensible evidence for discarnate personal survival without giving due care to potential evidence against it, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. How Not to Do Survival Research: Reflections on the Bigelow Institute Essay Competition.Keith Augustine - 2022 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 36 (2):366-398.
    The recent Bigelow Institute contest rewarding the "best" evidence for life after death epitomizes much of what's wrong with the current state of survival research, its participants constituting a who's who list of contemporary survival researchers. Cases that are regularly hyped as among the best evidence for an afterlife are all too often easily susceptible to normal explanations--if only survival researchers would give them a chance. The consistently negative results of 121 years of experimental survival research ought to have spurred (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24. Humanist Redemption and Afterlife: The Frankfurt School in Communist Romania.Alexandru Cistelecan - 2022 - Historical Materialism 30 (2):56-90.
    This paper discusses the reception of Frankfurt School critical theory in Communist Romania. After some opening remarks concerning the relevance of this topic, Section 2 sketches the evolving political and historical contexts that circumscribed this philosophical reception. The content and configuration of the Romanian reception of critical theory is then discussed in a double sequence: first (Section 3), by surveying and analysing the main clusters of arguments developed in these texts, which are filtered and classified into four categories: a) general (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. The Soul: How We Know It’s Real and Why It Matters. [REVIEW]Scott D. G. Ventureyra - 2014 - Science Et Esprit 66 (3):490-494.
  26. The Astronist Statement. Cometan - 2022 - Preston, UK: Astral Publishing.
    The Astronist Statement on the Situation of the Human Species, often simply referred to as The Astronist Statement, is a non-technical manifesto of the Astronist philosophy and religion, altogether referenced as the Astronist belief system. It provides a summary of the Astronist perspective on the human condition as this pertains to and is influenced by the ultimate goals of Astronism and the purposes it prescribes to human life through its doctrines on transcension, cosmocentrism, suronality and astrosis. The Astronist Statement is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Astronism: the religion of the stars. Cometan - 2022 - Preston, UK: Astronist Institution.
    Astronism: the religion of the stars is a technical summary of the Astronist religion and philosophy that uses terminology unique to the Astronists and specialised knowledge of Astronist beliefs. It is the perfect brief introduction to Astronism for those with prior understanding of the academic disciplines of eschatology, soteriology, theology and philosophy as the Astronist view on all of these subject areas and more is provided. Astronism: the religion of the stars attempts to explain the narrative that underlies Astronist beliefs (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Thomas Aquinas on Separated Souls as Incomplete Human Person.Brandon Dahm & Daniel De Haan - 2019 - The Thomist 83 (4):589-637.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. The Role of Afterlife Myths in Plato's Moral Arguments.Daniel William Issler - unknown
    I will address the issue of Plato’s use of myths concerning the afterlife in the context of the ethical arguments of the Gorgias, Phaedo and Republic, and I will contend that while the arguments in each dialogue are aimed at convincing the rational part of the self, the myths are aimed at persuading the non-rational part of the self. In support of this interpretation, I will examine Plato’s views on the relation between the different parts of the soul and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Heavenly creatures? Visions of animal afterlife in seventeenth-century England.Lloyd Strickland - 2022 - Journal of Religious History, Literature, and Culture 1 (8):1-24.
    This article offers an extensive study of the idea of an animal afterlife in seventeenth-century England. While some have argued that the idea of an animal afterlife became prevalent at the time due to increased awareness of animals’ mental abilities, others have suggested it was due to greater sensitivity to animal suffering and the perceived need to square this suffering with divine justice. I show that both views are incorrect, and that seventeenth-century thinking about an animal afterlife was first and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. The Afterlife of Decriminalisation: Anti-trafficking, Child Protection, and the Limits of Trauma-informed Efforts.Jennifer Lynne Musto - 2022 - Ethics and Social Welfare 16 (2):169-192.
    Numerous laws have passed to move away from criminalising youth who trade sex. Specialised courts have also been established to support youth. Despite proponents' contention that specialised, trauma-informed courts are less punitive than typical interventions, research is limited. This article explores one specialised dependency court's efforts to assist youth ‘at risk’. Drawing on interviews and ethnographic observations, I argue that laws and trauma-informed court interventions intensify the supervision of youth and families while inadvertently concealing the gendered-racialised effects of child welfare (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. A Course on the Afterlife of Plato’s Symposium.James Lesher - 2004 - Classical Journal 100:75-85.
    A course on the afterlife of Plato’s Symposium can accomplish two worthwhile objectives. It can afford students an opportunity to study a philosophical and literary masterpiece, and it can introduce them to some of the main currents in modern European culture. One recent iteration of such a course addressed six questions: (1) Why might Plato have chosen to write a dialogue about a ‘drinking party’? (2) Why did Plato present multiple speeches on the nature of Eros? (3) Why have some (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Wrongful Procreation, Factory Farming, and the Afterlife.Dustin Crummett - 2021 - Faith and Philosophy 38 (3):337-358.
    Sometimes, I can affect whether an individual is created, but not how their life goes if they’re created. If their life will be bad enough, I apparently wrong them by allowing their creation. But sometimes, popular religious views imply that the created individual is guaranteed to have an infinitely good existence on balance. Since, I argue, I don’t wrong someone by allowing their creation when it’s infinitely good for them on balance, these views apparently have unacceptable implications for procreation ethics. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Global Dialogues in the Philosophy of Religion: from Religious Experience to the Afterlife.Yujin Nagasawa & Mohammad Saleh Zarepour (eds.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Griselda’s Afterlife, or the Relationship between Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale, Chaucer’s The Clerk’s Tale and the Tale of Magic.Andrzej Wicher - 2021 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 11:334-352.
    Some influence of Chaucer’s The Clerk’s Tale, also known as the story of the patient Griselda, on Shakespeare, and particularly on The Winter’s Tale, has long been recognized. It seems, however, that the matter deserves further attention because the echoes of The Clerk’s Tale seem scattered among a number of Shakespeare’s plays, especially the later ones. The experimental nature of this phenomenon consists in the fact that Griselda-like characters do not strike the reader, especially perhaps the Renaissance reader, as good (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Film and the Afterlife.David Rankin - 2019 - Routledge.
    This book explores how post-death existence is represented in popular film, looking at issues such as continuity, personal identity, and the nature of existence beyond the grave. Film often returns to the theme of dying, death and the afterlife, both directly and indirectly, because there are very few subjects as compelling and universal. The book compares the representation of death, dying and the afterlife in films to scholarly surveys of attitudes towards life-after-death through the analysis of twenty films made between (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Imagining the Afterlife in the Ancient World.Juliette Harrisson - 2018 - Routledge.
    Human beings have speculated about whether or not there is life after death, and if so, what form that life might take, for centuries. What did people in the ancient world think the next life would hold, and did they imagine there was a chance for a relationship between the living and the dead? How did people in the ancient world keep their dead loved ones alive through memory, and were they afraid the dead might return and haunt the living (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. The Death and Afterlife of Mahatma Gandhi.Makarand R. Paranjape - 2014 - Routledge.
    Who is responsible for the Mahatma's death? Just one single, but determined, fanatic, the whole ideology of Hindu nationalism, the ruling Congress-led government whichfailed to protect him, or a vast majority of Indians and their descendants who considered Gandhi irrelevant? Such questions mean that Gandhi, even after his tragic and brutal death, continues to haunt India – perhaps more effectively in his afterlife than when he was alive. The Death and Afterlife of Mahatma Gandhi is a groundbreaking and profound analysis (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. ‘The Soviet Problem’ in Post-Soviet Russian Marxism, or the Afterlife of the USSR.Vladimir Tikhonov - 2021 - Historical Materialism 29 (4):153-187.
    The present article deals with different Marxist theories on the Soviet experience, which emerged in post-Soviet Russophone Marxist or neo-Marxist scholarship (concurrently with some reference to Marxist traditions in other former Eastern Bloc countries). The article demonstrates that these theories – if we leave the remaining ‘Marxist-Leninists’ of the classical Soviet type aside and focus on critical, post-Soviet Marxism – may be classified as either ‘fundamentally rejectionist’ or ‘Thermidorian’. The former, in line with the seminal criticisms of K. Kautsky and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Mammoth, or: The Dialectic of Human Afterlife.Stefan Niklas - 2021 - Krisis 41 (2):98-101.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Afterlife.Wyatt MacGaffey - 2021 - In V. Y. Mudimbe & Kasereka Kavwahirehi (eds.), Encyclopedia of African Religions and Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 39-40.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Russian Religious Philosophy: The Nature of the Phenomenon, Its Path, and Its Afterlife.Sergey S. Horujy - 2021 - In Marina F. Bykova, Michael N. Forster & Lina Steiner (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Russian Thought. Springer Verlag. pp. 51-72.
    The tasks of this text are not historical, at least in the sense of describing historical facts or sources. Today in the factual history of Russian philosophy, there are no greater lacunae or enigmas. Thus the principal goal of this chapter is conceptual: it is to comprehend the phenomenon of Russian religious philosophy both in its diachrony and in synchrony. These two aspects will be considered not nacheinander, but nebeneinander that is not in succession, but in parallel to each other. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. Holism, Particularity, and the Vividness of Life.August Gorman - 2022 - The Journal of Ethics (3):1-15.
    John Martin Fischer’s Death, Immortality, and Meaning in Life puts forth a view that individual experiences could provide us with sources of endless fascination, motivation, and value if only we could live forever to continue to enjoy them. In this article I advocate for more caution about embracing this picture by pointing to three points of tension in Fischer's book. First, I argue that taking meaningfulness in life to be holistic is not compatible with the view immortal lives would be (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Commentary on Rich Eva’s “Religious Liberty and the Alleged Afterlife”. [REVIEW]Emily McGill - 2021 - Southwest Philosophy Review 37 (2):49-51.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Religious Liberty and the Alleged Afterlife.Richard Eva - 2021 - Southwest Philosophy Review 37 (1):179-185.
    It is common for religiously motivated actions to be specially protected by law. Many legal theorists have asked why: what makes religion special? What makes it worthy of toleration over and above other non-religious deeply held convictions? The answer I put forward is that religions’ alleged afterlife consequences call for a principle of toleration that warrants special legal treatment. Under a Rawlsian principle of toleration, it is reasonable for those in the original position to opt for principles of justice that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Praying for the Dead: An Ecumenical Proposal.Benjamin McCraw - 2017 - In Kristof K. P. Vanhoutte & Benjamin McCraw (eds.), Purgatory: Philosophical Dimensions. Basingstoke, UK: pp. 239-262.
    In this paper, I defend the claim that we have good reason to think that God can (and maybe does) answer prayers for the dead, and, perhaps surprisingly, these reasons hold even if one is agnostic on Purgatory. I examine philosophical discussions on the efficacy of both petitionary prayer and praying for the past: showing that the reasons offered for efficacious prayers of those types apply to prayers for the dead as well. Hence, supposing that we have good reasons to (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Bodily Desires and Afterlife Punishment in the 'Phaedo'.Doug Reed - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 59:45-78.
    In this paper I investigate whether in the 'Phaedo' the body or the soul is the subject of bodily desires. By analyzing Plato’s portrayal of the disembodied soul in the dialogue, I argue that because many souls are shown possessing bodily desires after death, the soul can possess bodily desires. Part of my analysis is built on my argument that the best way to understand afterlife punishment in the dialogue is as the necessary frustration of persistent bodily desires. Finally, I (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Intuitive Dualism and Afterlife Beliefs: A Cross‐Cultural Study.H. Clark Barrett, Alexander Bolyanatz, Tanya Broesch, Emma Cohen, Peggy Froerer, Martin Kanovsky, Mariah G. Schug & Stephen Laurence - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (6):e12992.
    It is widely held that intuitive dualism—an implicit default mode of thought that takes minds to be separable from bodies and capable of independent existence—is a human universal. Among the findings taken to support universal intuitive dualism is a pattern of evidence in which “psychological” traits (knowledge, desires) are judged more likely to continue after death than bodily or “biological” traits (perceptual, physiological, and bodily states). Here, we present cross-cultural evidence from six study populations, including non-Western societies with diverse belief (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. An ethical framework for the digital afterlife industry.Carl Öhman & Luciano Floridi - 2018 - Nature Human Behavior 2 (5):318-320.
    The web is increasingly inhabited by the remains of its departed users, a phenomenon that has given rise to a burgeoning digital afterlife industry. This industry requires a framework for dealing with its ethical implications. We argue that the regulatory conventions guiding archaeological exhibitions could provide the basis for such a framework.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  50. On Being Afraid of Hell: Kierkegaard and Catholicism on Imperfect Contrition.Jack Mulder Jr - 2007 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2007 (2007):96-122.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1978