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  1. Perception and Apperception in Mulla Sadra and Leibniz.Dr R. Davari - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 19.
    The comparative study of Islamic philosophical views to those of contemporary philosophers calls for careful consideration of their opinions.This is because the similarities are apparent but the purport of what they say is quite different. Yet, the apparent similarities should not be thoroughly ignored and one can perhaps say that Leibniz's theory of perception and apperception is epistemologically close to the Sadrean theory of conceptual and judgmental knowledge. At least one can say that although Leibniz belongs to the tradition of (...)
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  2. Unity of Consciousness: In Defense of a Leibnizian View.Farid Masrour - forthcoming - In Christopher Hill David Bennett (ed.), Sensory Integration and the Unity of Consciousness. MIT Press.
    It is common to hold that our conscious experiences at a single moment are often unified. But when consciousness is unified, what are the fundamental facts in virtue of which it is unified? On some accounts of the unity of consciousness, the most fundamental fact that grounds unity is a form of singularity or oneness. These accounts are similar to Newtonian views of space according to which the most fundamental fact that grounds relations of co-spatiality between various points (or regions) (...)
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  3. The Unconscious of Thought in Leibniz, Spinoza, and Hume.Gil Morejón - 2022 - Edinburgh University Press.
  4. Presumptions and Cognitive Simplicity in Leibniz and Early Modern Legal Theory.Andreas Blank - 2021 - In Tilmann Altwicker, Francis Cheneval & Matthias Mahlmann (eds.), Rechts- und Staatsphilosophie bei G. W. Leibniz. Tübingen, Deutschland: Mohr Siebeck. pp. 23-42.
  5. Leibniz’s Influence on Hermann Cohen’s Interpretation of Kant.Scott Edgar - 2021 - Kant E-Prints 16 (2):200-230.
    In the second edition of Hermann Cohen’s Kant’s Theory of Experience, he abandons the interpretation of Kant’s Anticipations of Perception that he gave in the first edition, in favourof a radically different one. On his early interpretation, the Anticipations is largely of psychological interest for its influence on, and continuing significance for, physiological psychology and psychophysics. But on his mature interpretation, it defends the superiority of a dynamic conception of nature over a mechanical conception. Further, on his early interpretation, Cohen (...)
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  6. Leibniz’s Appropriation of Spinoza’s Argument Against Mind-Body Causation.Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero - 2021 - The Leibniz Review 31:35-57.
    In a 1687 letter to Arnauld, Leibniz draws on an argument against mind-body causation that is reminiscent of one from Spinoza’s Ethics. According to this argument, mind-body causation is impossible because of the lack of proportion between thoughts and motions. This paper aims to shed light on Leibniz’s use of Spinoza’s argument by reconstructing both its internal structure and its development in Leibniz’s later works. In particular, the reconstruction focuses on the new version of this argument that Leibniz adopts against (...)
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  7. Brandom's Leibniz.Zachary Gartenberg - 2021 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 102 (1):73-102.
    I discuss an objection by Margaret Wilson against Robert Brandom’s interpretation of Leibniz’s account of perceptual distinctness. According to Brandom, Leibniz holds that (i) the relative distinctness of a perception is a function of its inferentially articulated content and (ii) apperception, or awareness, is explicable in terms of degrees of perceptual distinctness. Wilson alleges that Brandom confuses ‘external deducibility’ from a perceptual state of a monad to the existence of properties in the world, with ‘internally accessible content’ for the monad (...)
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  8. Leibniz's Naturalized Philosophy of Mind by Larry M. Jorgensen.Ursula Goldenbaum - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (4):684-686.
    Larry Jorgensen aims to show that "Leibniz offers a fully natural theory of mind", recommending Leibniz to our contemporary discussion of naturalism. Readers of Leibniz will, however, hesitate to call him a naturalist. After all, he considered natural laws to be subordinated rules below general divine laws and rejected explaining the soul's action by bodily motion. Jorgensen does have a point, though, when he refers to Leibniz's frequent pleas for natural explanations and his continuity principle.Jorgensen's project unfolds in four parts. (...)
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  9. Christian Barth: Intentionalität und Bewusstsein in der frühen Neuzeit. Die Philosophie des Geistes von René Descartes und Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Frankfurt a. M. 2017: Vittorio Klostermann... [REVIEW]Boris Hennig - 2021 - Philosophische Rundschau 68 (1):60.
  10. Leibniz’s Naturalized Philosophy of Mind [by Larry Jorgensen]. [REVIEW]Julia Jorati - 2021 - Philosophical Review 130 (3):455-458.
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  11. The Guise of the Good in Leibniz.Julia Jorati - 2021 - Philosophical Explorations 24 (1):48-62.
    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz endorses a version of the guise of the good thesis: he holds that whenever we do something intentionally, we do it because it seems good to us. This paper explores Leibniz...
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  12. Imaginative Animals: Leibniz's Logic of Imagination.Lucia Oliveri - 2021 - Stoccarda, Germania: Steiner Verlag.
    Through the reconstruction of Leibniz's theory of the degrees of knowledge, this e-book investigates and explores the intrinsic relationship of imagination with space and time. The inquiry into this relationship defines the logic of imagination that characterizes both human and non-human animals, albeit differently, making them two different species of imaginative animals. -/- Lucia Oliveri explains how the emergence of language in human animals goes hand in hand with the emergence of thought and a different form of rationality constituted by (...)
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  13. Why Leibniz Should Have Agreed with Berkeley About Abstract Ideas.Stephen Puryear - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 29 (6):1054-1071.
    Leibniz claims that Berkeley “wrongly or at least pointlessly rejects abstract ideas”. What he fails to realize, however, is that some of his own core views commit him to essentially the same stance. His belief that this is the best (and thus most harmonious) possible world, which itself stems from his Principle of Sufficient Reason, leads him to infer that mind and body must perfectly represent or ‘express’ one another. In the case of abstract thoughts he admits that this can (...)
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  14. Demasiada felicidad. Sobre la teoría de los afectos en Descartes y Leibniz.Vicente Raga Rosaleny - 2021 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 54 (2):349-364.
    Descartes y Leibniz figuran como pensadores opuestos en el ámbito de la filosofía moderna. Tras un período de influencia inicial, el pensador alemán habría sido un crítico severo de las tesis filosóficas del filósofo francés. Sin embargo, una lectura cuidadosa de las dispersas declaraciones leibnizianas a propósito de los afectos y su dimensión moral nos permitirán hacernos cargo de la distancia y cercanía entre el pensamiento de ambos. Para Descartes la felicidad está ligada a la voluntad, mientras que Leibniz será (...)
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  15. Judgement in Leibniz’s Conception of the Mind: Predication, Affirmation, and Denial.Christian Barth - 2020 - Topoi (3).
    The aim of the paper is to illuminate some core aspects of Leibniz’s conception of judgement and its place in his conception of the mind. In particular, the paper argues for three claims: First, the act of judgement is at the centre of Leibniz’s conception of the mind in that minds strive at actualising innate knowledge concerning derivative truths, where the actualising involves an act of judgement. Second, Leibniz does not hold a judgement account of predication, but a two-component account (...)
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  16. Leibniz: sobre las presunciones y la simplicidad cognitiva.Andreas Blank - 2020 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 39 (1):149–176.
    Este artículo examina el rol del concepto de simplicidad cognitiva en la perspectiva de Leibniz sobre las presunciones. El tratamiento de Leibniz acerca de la conexión entre simplicidad y presunción puede aportar algo significativo a los enfoques contemporáneos sobre la plausibilidad de las presunciones. Esto se explica porque, a diferencia de los enfoques contemporáneos centrados en el lado pragmático de la simplicidad cognitiva, Leibniz ha procurado basarla en aquello que ocurre con mayor facilidad en la realidad. El filósofo se apoya (...)
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  17. Leibniz’s Naturalized Philosophy of Mind, by Larry M. Jorgensen.Julia Borcherding - 2020 - The Leibniz Review 30:109-117.
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  18. Leibniz and the Molyneux Problem.Bridger Ehli - 2020 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 2 (1):8.
    The Molyneux problem is one of the major questions addressed by early modern authors. Whereas Locke’s response to Molyneux’s question has been the subject of extensive scholarly discussion, Leibniz’s response has received comparatively little attention. This paper defends an interpretation of Leibniz’s nuanced response to the problem and criticizes a competing interpretation that has recently been proposed.
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  19. Embodied Cognition Without Causal Interaction in Leibniz.Julia Jorati - 2020 - In Dominik Perler & Sebastian Bender (eds.), Causation and Cognition in Early Modern Philosophy. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 252–273.
    My aim in this chapter is to explain how and why all human cognition depends on the body for Leibniz. I will show that there are three types of dependence: (a) the body is needed in order to supply materials, or content, for thinking; (b) the body is needed in order to give us the opportunity for the discovery of innate ideas; and (c) the body is needed in order to provide sensory notions as vehicles of thought. The third type (...)
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  20. The Correspondence with Arnauld.Julia Jorati - 2020 - In Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland (eds.), Leibniz’s Key Philosophical Writings. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 80-100.
    Leibniz’s correspondence with Antoine Arnauld is one of the clearest and most comprehensive expressions of Leibniz’s philosophy in the so-called middle period. This chapter will explore the philosophical content of this correspondence. It will concentrate on four of the most central topics: (a) complete concepts and contingency, (b) substance and body, (c) causation, and (d) the special status of rational souls in God’s plan.
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  21. Leibniz's Key Philosophical Writings: A Guide.Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland (eds.) - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents introductory chapters from internationally-renowned experts on eleven of Leibniz's key philosophical writings. Offering accessible accounts of the ideas and arguments of his work, along with information on their composition and context, this book is an invaluable companion to the study of Leibniz.
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  22. Leibniz and Descartes.Jean-Pascal Anfray - 2019 - In Steven Nadler, Tad M. Schmaltz & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Descartes and Cartesianism. Oxford University Press.
  23. Leibniz's Principle and Psycho-Neural Identity.Andrea Bottani & Alfredo Paternoster - 2019 - In Richard Davies (ed.), Natural and Artifactual Objects in Contemporary Metaphysics: Exercises in Analytic Ontology. Bloomsbury Academic.
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  24. Worlds Apart: An Interpretation of Leibnizian Perceiving.Michael Hansen - 2019 - Dissertation, UCLA
    This dissertation interprets Leibniz’ notion of perception through abilities, agency, and action. In chapter 1, I characterize the differences between kinds of Leibnizian perception by considering their relationship to different abilities. I focus on lower cognition, where Leibniz distinguishes bare perception from sensation by their degrees of distinctness and memory. I read this relationship, between kinds of perception and qualities of perception, through actions. I begin with complete lacks of distinctness and memory and how they relate to stupors as an (...)
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  25. Leibniz's Naturalized Philosophy of Mind.Larry M. Jorgensen - 2019 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This book is a systematic reappraisal of Leibniz’s philosophy of mind. The main argument of this book is easy to state: Leibniz offers a fully natural theory of mind. In today’s philosophical climate, in which much effort has been put into discovering a naturalized theory of mind, Leibniz’s efforts to reach a similar goal 300 years earlier will provide a critical stance from which we can assess our own theories. But while the goals might be similar, the content of Leibniz’s (...)
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  26. Immaterial Mechanism in the Mature Leibniz.Christopher P. Noble - 2019 - Idealistic Studies 49 (1):1-21.
    Leibniz standardly associates “mechanism” with extended material bodies and their aggregates. In this paper, I identify and analyze a further distinct sense of “mechanism” in Leibniz that extends, by analogy, beyond the domain of material bodies and applies to the operations of immaterial substances such as the monads that serve, for Leibniz, as the metaphysical foundations of physical reality. I argue that in this sense, Leibniz understands “mechanism” as an intelligible process that is capable of providing a sufficient reason for (...)
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  27. Intentionalität und Bewusstsein in der frühen Neuzeit. Die Philosophie des Geistes von René Descartes und Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. [REVIEW]Jan Levin Propach - 2019 - Theologie Und Philosophie 94:427-429.
  28. Comments on “Leibniz on Internal Action and Why Mills Can't Think”.Paul Rateau - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:41-48.
  29. Leibniz on Internal Action and Why Mills Can't Think.Marleen Rozemond - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:13-40.
  30. Locke and Leibniz on Judgment: The First-Person Perspective and the Danger of Psychologism.Maria van der Schaar - 2019 - In Brian Andrew Ball & Christoph Schuringa (eds.), The Act and Object of Judgment: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge.
  31. Leibniz on Perception, Sensation, Apperception, and Conscientia.Christian Barth - 2018 - In Rebecca Copenhaver (ed.), History of the Philosophy of Mind, Vol. 4: Philosophy of Mind in the Early Modern and Modern Ages. London, Vereinigtes Königreich: pp. 220-244.
    In his famous monadological metaphysics, Leibniz distinguishes between simple monads, animal monads, and rational monads or minds. This tripartite metaphysical distinction is mirrored by his discrimination between cognitive performances these three types of monads are capable of. Simple monads perceive; animal monads additionally remember, sense, and mimic reasoning by associating mental images; rational monads, furthermore, think, reflect on and know themselves, know eternal truths, and reason logically. This essay will focus on Leibniz's account of the cognitive performances of minds and (...)
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  32. Leibniz on Appetitions and Desires.Julia Jorati - 2018 - In Rebecca Copenhaver (ed.), History of the Philosophy of Mind, Vol. 4: Philosophy of Mind in the Early Modern and Modern Ages. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 245–265.
    Leibniz sometimes tells us that there are only two fundamental types of mental states: perceptions and appetitions, that is, mental representations and desire-like states. While this may sound like an overly sparse ontology of mental states, the philosophy of mind that Leibniz builds from these elements is surprisingly nuanced and powerful. What makes this possible is that he distinguishes different sub-types of these mental states. Leibniz famously differentiates between unconscious and conscious perceptions, which gives him an advantage over philosophers like (...)
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  33. Epigenesis of Pure Reason and the Source of Pure Cognitions.Huaping Lu-Adler - 2018 - In Pablo Muchnik & Oliver Thorndike (eds.), Rethinking Kant Vol.5. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 35-70.
    Kant describes logic as “the science that exhaustively presents and strictly proves nothing but the formal rules of all thinking”. (Bviii-ix) But what is the source of our cognition of such rules (“logical cognition” for short)? He makes no concerted effort to address this question. It will nonetheless become clear that the question is a philosophically significant one for him, to which he can see three possible answers: those representations are innate, derived from experience, or originally acquired a priori. Although (...)
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  34. Leibniz’ Metaphysik der Modalität. [REVIEW]Jan Levin Propach - 2018 - Theologie Und Philosophie 93:269-272.
  35. Leibnizin pienet havainnot ja tunteiden muodostuminen.Markku Roinila - 2018 - Havainto.
    Keskityn siihen miten Leibnizilla yksittäiset mielihyvän tai mielipahan tiedostamattomat havainnot voivat kasautua tai tiivistyä ja muodostaa vähitellen tunteita, joista tulemme tietoisiksi.
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  36. Leibniz on Innate Ideas and Kant on the Origin of the Categories.Alberto Vanzo - 2018 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 100 (1):19-45.
    In his essay against Eberhard, Kant denies that there are innate concepts. Several scholars take Kant’s statement at face value. They claim that Kant did not endorse concept innatism, that the categories are not innate concepts, and that Kant’s views on innateness are significantly different from Leibniz’s. This paper takes issue with those claims. It argues that Kant’s views on the origin of the intellectual concepts are remarkably similar to Leibniz’s. Given two widespread notions of innateness, the dispositional notion and (...)
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  37. El Poder I Els Límits de la Raó. Alguns Aspectes de la Crítica de Leibniz a Pierre Bayle.Marta De Mendonça - 2017 - Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía 59:91-109.
    https://revistes.uab.cat/enrahonar/article/view/v59-de-mendonca.
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  38. Self-Moving Machines and the Soul: Leibniz Contra Spinoza on the Spiritual Automaton.Christopher P. Noble - 2017 - The Leibniz Review 27:65-89.
    The young Spinoza and the mature Leibniz both characterize the soul as a self-moving spiritual automaton. Though it is unclear if Leibniz’s use of the term was suggested to him from his reading of Spinoza, Leibniz was aware of its presence in Spinoza’s Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect. Considering Leibniz’s staunch opposition to Spinozism, the question arises as to why he was willing to adopt this term. I propose an answer to this question by comparing the spiritual automaton (...)
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  39. Operar E Exibir: Aspectos Do Conhecimento Simbólico Na Filosofia Tractariana da Matemática.Gisele Dalva Secco & Pedro Maggi Rech Noguez - 2017 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 73 (3-4):1463-1492.
    We offer a reading of some passages from Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus in which, dealing with the symbolic constructions of arithmetic, Wittgenstein puts in motion the most outstanding features of Leibniz’s concept of Symbolic Knowledge: the computational and the “ecthetic” functions of the notion of Symbolic Blind Though. We begin with a brief presentation of some conceptual distinctions proposed by Oscar Miguel Esquisabel in his investigation about the Leibnizian origin of the tradition of Symbolic Knowledge. We then contrast these topics with (...)
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  40. Review of "Leibniz's Mill" by Charles Landesman. [REVIEW]Lloyd Strickland - 2017 - Heythrop Journal 58 (3):545-546.
  41. Expressão e inteligibilidade: uma teoria cognitiva em torno da harmonia universal.Sofia Araújo - 2016 - In Juan Antonio Nicolás, Manuel Sánchez, Miguel Escribano, Herrera Laura, Higueras Manuel, Palomo Miguel & José María Gómez Delgado (eds.), La monadología de Leibniz a debate. Granada: Editorial Comares. pp. 105-115.
    O que é a «harmonia universal»? Uma causa, um efeito, um estado-de-coisas? Como Leibniz escreve a este respeito numa carta a Magnus Wedderkopf, a última razão para o intelecto divino e, consequentemente, a vontade de Deus, é a harmonia. Porém, como razão última, nada existe para lá da própria harmonia. Segundo o raciocínio leibniziano, a harmonia pode assim ser perspetivada não só como um estado-de-coisas, mas também como causa da própria organização das coisas. Muito embora a harmonia possa ser perspetivada (...)
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  42. Intentionalität und Bewusstsein in der frühen Neuzeit. Die Philosophie des Geistes von René Descartes und Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz.Christian Barth - 2016 - Frankfurt am Main, Deutschland: Klostermann.
    Wie ist es zu erklären, dass wir uns vermittels geistiger Akte auf Gegenstände beziehen können? Und wodurch sind uns geistige Akte bewusst? René Descartes und Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz geben faszinierende Antworten auf diese beiden zentralen Fragen der Philosophie des Geistes. In dieser Studie werden die Konzeptionen beider Autoren im Detail analysiert, miteinander verglichen und mit heutigen Positionen in Beziehung gesetzt. Die Analysen zeigen, dass Descartes eine deflationäre Konzeption des Bewusstseins (conscientia) vertritt. Bewusstsein ist „nur“ ein Aspekt der Intentionalität, die das (...)
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  43. Reflection and Rationality in Leibniz.Sebastian Bender - 2016 - In Jari Kaukua & Tomas Ekenberg (eds.), Subjectivity and Selfhood in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. pp. 263-275.
    Leibniz repeatedly states that there is a very close connection between reflection and rationality. In his view, reflective acts somehow lead to self-consciousness, reason, the knowledge of necessary truths, and even to the moral liability of the respective substances. Whereas it might be relatively easy to see how reflective acts lead to self-consciousness, it is much harder to understand how they are connected to rationality. Why should a substance which is able to produce reflective acts therefore be rational? How can (...)
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  44. Striving Possibles and Leibniz’s Cognitivist Theory of Volition.Andreas Blank - 2016 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 5 (2):29-52.
    Leibniz’s claim that possibles strive towards existence has led to diverging interpretations. According to the metaphorical interpretation, only the divine will is causally efficacious in bringing possibles into exisence. According to the literal interpretation, God endows possibles with causal powers of their own. The present article suggests a solution to this interpretative impass by suggesting that the doctrine of the striving possibles can be understood as a consequence of Leibniz’s early cognitivist theory of volition. According to this theory, thinking the (...)
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  45. Leibniz on Consciousness.Tim Crane - 2016 - In Stephen Leach & James Tartaglia (eds.), Consciousness and the Great Philosophers. London:
    What would Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz have said about today’s problem of consciousness? Some philosophers claim that Leibniz was one of the first to argue that there is an ‘explanatory gap’ between our knowledge of matter and our knowledge of consciousness, and that he thought this posed a problem for materialism (see for example Churchland 1995: 191-2; Kriegel 2015: 49; Seager 1991; Searle 1983: 267-8). This is supposed to be the point of the famous passage in the Monadology (1714), in which (...)
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  46. Leibniz's Wolffian Psychology.Corey W. Dyck - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Vorträge des X. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongress, vol. 2. G. Olms. pp. 223-35..
    In this paper, I attempt to trace the broader contours of a putative Leibnizian psychology by adopting the rather unusual, and perhaps historically dubious, strategy of outlining the continuities between Leibniz’s discussion of the soul and the much more detailed and systematic psychological writings of his German successor, Christian Wolff.
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  47. Why Monads Need Appetites.Julia Jorati - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), ‘Für unser Glück oder das Glück anderer’: Vorträge des X. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongresses Hannover, 18.–23. Juli 2016, Vol. 5. Hildesheim, Germany: Olms. pp. 121–129.
    The mature Leibniz often describes monads as having two types of modifications: perceptions and appetites. But why would monads need appetites? When reading secondary literature about Leibniz, it can easily look as if appetites are superfluous: some scholars describe the inner workings of monads without saying much, if anything, about appetites. Instead, they focus on perceptions and explain the transition to new perceptions by reference to prior perceptions together with the underlying primitive force or law of the series. These interpretations (...)
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  48. A Temporalidade da Percepção Em Leibniz.Sacha Zilber Kontic - 2016 - Cadernos Espinosanos 34:191-212.
    Ao afirmar que o tempo é um continuum, Leibniz não pode considerar a percepção como uma simples sucessão de estados perceptivos. Pelo contrário, é necessário que haja uma continuidade de natureza entre esses diversos estados que se deva unicamente a espontaneidade da Mônada. A diferença entre as percepções da Mônada não pode se dar, entretanto, no conteúdo que ela representa, pois ela representa sempre uma mesma multiplicidade, ou seja, o universo tal como ele existe na mente divina, a partir de (...)
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  49. Percepção, Autoconsciência E Continuidade Em Leibniz.Edgar Marques - 2016 - Cadernos Espinosanos 34:15-38.
    De acordo com o Princípio da Continuidade, adotado por Leibniz, toda mudança ocorre gradativamente, havendo sempre um grau intermediário entre dois estados quaisquer. Esse princípio parece ser, contudo, incompatível com a doutrina leibniziana acerca da natureza da autoconsciência, uma vez que Leibniz, ao menos prima facie, sustenta haver uma diferença de natureza – e não apenas de grau – entre percepções inconscientes e conscientes, fornecendo esta distinção a base para a diferenciação ontológica das mônadas entre puras enteléquias, almas e espíritos. (...)
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  50. Percepções, Sensações E Apercepções Em Leibniz.Edgar Marques - 2016 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 72 (2-3):299-320.
    My main goal, in this paper, is to show that there is in Leibniz a difference of nature between perceptions, sensations and apperception in Leibniz, and not only a gradual difference in function of their degrees of confusion/distinction.
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