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  1.  33
    Botanical exchanges: Jean-Jacques Rousseau and the Duchess of Portland.Alexandra Cook - 2007 - History of European Ideas 33 (2):142-156.
    In 1766 Jean-Jacques Rousseau, in exile from France and Switzerland, came to England, where he made the acquaintance of Margaret Cavendish Harley Bentinck, Duchess of Portland. The two began to botanise together and to exchange letters about botany. These letters contain salient statements about Rousseau's views on natural theology, gardens, botanical texts and exotic botany. This exchange entailed not only discussions about plant identifications and other botanical matters, but most important, reciprocal gifts of books and specimens in the manner of (...)
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  2.  5
    The “Demarcation Problem” in Science: What Has Enlightenment Got to Do with It? Part I.Alexandra Cook - 2022 - Dialogue and Universalism 32 (1):165-188.
    Steven Pinker’s recent Enlightenment Now aside, Enlightenment values have been in for a rough ride of late. Following Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno’s critique of Enlightenment as the source of fascism, recent studies, amplified by Black Lives Matter, have laid bare the ugly economic underbelly of Enlightenment. The prosperity that enabled intellectuals to scrutinize speculative truths in eighteenth-century Paris salons relied on the slave trade and surplus value extracted from slave labor on sugar plantations and in other areas Europeans controlled. (...)
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  3. Linnaeus and Chinese plants: A test of the linguistic imperialism thesis.Alexandra Cook - unknown
    It has been alleged that Carolus Linnaeus practised Eurocentrism, sexism and racism in naming plant genera after famous botanists, and excluding ‘barbarous names’. He has therefore been said to practise ‘linguistic imperialism’. This paper examines whether Linnaeus applied ‘linguistic imperialism’ to the naming of Chinese plants. On the basis of examples such as Thea (¼Camellia), Urena, Basella, Annona, Sapindus (¼Koelreuteria), and Panax, I conclude that Linnaeus used generic names of diverse origins. However, he misidentified Chinese plants’ habitats, and acted on (...)
     
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  4.  22
    Book Review: Rousseau among the Moderns: Music, Aesthetics, Politics, by Julia SimonRousseau among the Moderns: Music, Aesthetics, Politics, by SimonJulia. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2013, x + 240 pp. [REVIEW]Alexandra Cook - 2016 - Political Theory 44 (3):437-442.
  5.  3
    The “Demarcation Problem” in Science: What Has Enlightenment Got to Do with It? Part II.Alexandra Cook - 2022 - Dialogue and Universalism 32 (1):189-202.
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  6.  22
    Dorinda Outram, the enlightenment. Second edition. New approaches to european history. Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 2005. Pp. XIII+165. Isbn 0-521-546681-8. £14.99, $24.99 . William E. Burns, science in the enlightenment: An encyclopedia. Santa Barbara: Abc-clio, 2003. Pp. xcviii+165. Isbn 1-57607-887-6. $65.00. [REVIEW]Alexandra Cook - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Science 40 (1):137-139.
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  7.  20
    Michael Keevak, Becoming Yellow: A Short History of Racial Thinking. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011. Pp. ix+219. ISBN 978-0-691-14301-5. £24.95. [REVIEW]Alexandra Cook - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Science 47 (2):378-379.
  8.  10
    Jean-Daniel candaux and Jean-Marc Drouin , Augustin-pyramus de candolle: Mémoires et souvenirs . Bibliothèque d'histoire Des sciences, 5. Geneva: Georg editeur, 2003. Pp. XV+591. Isbn 2-8257-0832-1. €33.00. [REVIEW]Alexandra Cook - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Science 38 (4):482-483.
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  9. The 'Septie`me promenade' of the Reˆveries: a peculiar account of Rousseau's botany?Alexandra Cook - unknown
    IN an article on Rousseau’s annotations of a popular botany text, Henry Cheyron describes the Genevan philosopher as ‘ce botaniste me´juge´’. 3 The misapprehension of Rousseau’s botanical practice identified by Cheyron has its roots, I believe, in Rousseau’s own depiction of his botanising in the Reˆveries; in the ‘Septie`me promenade’ Rousseau selfconsciously portrays this study as socially isolated, lazy and lacking in direction: ‘La botanique est l’e´tude d’un oisif et paresseux solitaire... Il se prome`ne, il erre librement d’un objet a` (...)
     
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  10.  2
    Working With Type 1 Diabetes: Investigating the Associations Between Diabetes-Related Distress, Burnout, and Job Satisfaction.Alexandra Cook & Alexander Zill - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The present study investigates the association between diabetes-related distress and work outcomes among employed people with type 1 diabetes. Employed adults with type 1 diabetes completed an online survey. Measures assessed emotional, social, food- and treatment-related DD, burnout, and job satisfaction, as well as the type of insulin treatment. We conducted multiple regression analyses to test our hypotheses. Emotional DD was significantly and positively associated with burnout. Social DD was significantly and negatively associated with job satisfaction. The type of treatment (...)
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  11.  6
    Sue Ann Prince . Of Elephants and Roses: French Natural History, 1790–1830. xxvi + 268 pp., illus., index. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 2013. $50. [REVIEW]Alexandra Cook - 2015 - Isis 106 (2):457-458.
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