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Lloyd P. Gerson [154]Lloyd Gerson [31]Lloyd R. Gerson [1]Lloyd Phillip Gerson [1]
  1.  27
    Plotinus.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1994 - New York: Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  2.  44
    Aristotle and other Platonists.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2005 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    "Aristotle versus Plato. For a long time that is the angle from which the tale has been told, in textbooks on the history of philosophy and to university students. Aristotle's philosophy, so the story goes, was au fond in opposition to Plato's. But it was not always thus."--from the Introduction In a wide-ranging book likely to cause controversy, Lloyd P. Gerson sets out the case for the "harmony" of Platonism and Aristotelianism, the standard view in late antiquity. He aims to (...)
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  3.  14
    From Plato to Platonism.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2013 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    Was Plato a Platonist? While ancient disciples of Plato would have answered this question in the affirmative, modern scholars have generally denied that Plato's own philosophy was in substantial agreement with that of the Platonists of succeeding centuries. In From Plato to Platonism, Lloyd P. Gerson argues that the ancients are correct in their assessment. He arrives at this conclusion in an especially ingenious manner, challenging fundamental assumptions about how Plato's teachings have come to be understood. Through deft readings of (...)
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  4.  70
    Knowing persons: a study in Plato.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2003 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Knowing Persons is an original study of Plato's account of personhood. For Plato, embodied persons are images of a disembodied ideal. The ideal person is a knower. Hence, the lives of embodied persons need to be understood according to Plato's metaphysics of imagery. For Gerson, Plato's account of embodied personhood is not accurately conflated with Cartesian dualism. Plato's dualism is more appropriately seen in the contrast between the ideal disembodied person and the embodied one than in the contrast between mind (...)
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  5.  21
    Who Speaks for Plato?: Studies in Platonic Anonymity.Hayden W. Ausland, Eugenio Benitez, Ruby Blondell, Lloyd P. Gerson, Francisco J. Gonzalez, J. J. Mulhern, Debra Nails, Erik Ostenfeld, Gerald A. Press, Gary Alan Scott, P. Christopher Smith, Harold Tarrant, Holger Thesleff, Joanne Waugh, William A. Welton & Elinor J. M. West - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this international and interdisciplinary collection of critical essays, distinguished contributors examine a crucial premise of traditional readings of Plato's dialogues: that Plato's own doctrines and arguments can be read off the statements made in the dialogues by Socrates and other leading characters. The authors argue in general and with reference to specific dialogues, that no character should be taken to be Plato's mouthpiece. This is essential reading for students and scholars of Plato.
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  6.  37
    Ancient Epistemology.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2009 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first title in the Key Themes in Ancient Philosophy series, which provides concise books, written by major scholars and accessible to non-specialists, on important themes in ancient philosophy which remain of philosophical interest today. In this book, Professor Gerson explores ancient accounts of the nature of knowledge and belief from the Presocratics up to the Platonists of late antiquity. He argues that ancient philosophers generally held a naturalistic view of knowledge as well as of belief. Hence, knowledge (...)
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  7.  14
    Platonism and Naturalism: The Possibility of Philosophy.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2020 - Ithaca [New York]: Cornell University Press.
    In his third and concluding volume, Lloyd P. Gerson presents an innovative account of Platonism, the central tradition in the history of philosophy, in conjunction with Naturalism, the "anti-Platonism" in antiquity and contemporary philosophy. In this broad and sweeping argument, Gerson contends that Platonism identifies philosophy with a distinct subject matter, namely, the intelligible world and seeks to show that the Naturalist rejection of Platonism entails the elimination of a distinct subject matter for philosophy. Thus, the possibility of philosophy depends (...)
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  8.  38
    The Epicurus Reader: Selected Writings and Testimonia.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1994 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    TABLE OF CONTENTS: Introduction The ancient biography of Epicurus The extant letters Ancient collections of maxims Doxographical reports The testimony of Cicero The testimony of Lucretius The polemic of Plutarch Short fragments and testimonia from known works: * From On Nature * From the Puzzles * From On the Goal * From the Symposium * From Against Theophrastus * Fragments of Epicurus' letters Short fragments and testimonia from uncertain works: * Logic and epistemology * Physics and theology * Ethics Index.
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  9. The Stoics Reader: Selected Writings and Testimonia.Brad Inwood & Lloyd P. Gerson (eds.) - 2008 - Hackett Pub. Co..
    Lives of the stoics (Zeno, Aristo, Herillus, Cleanthes, Sphaerus, Chrysippus) on philosophy -- Logic and theory of knowledge -- Perception, knowledge, and sceptical attack -- The stoic-academic debate and Cicero's testimony -- Conceptions and rationality -- Physics -- Theology -- Bodily and non-bodily realities -- Structures and powers -- The soul -- Fate -- Ethics -- The general account in Diogenes Lartius -- The account preserved by Stobaeus -- The account in Cicero on goals -- Other evidence for stoic ethics (...)
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  10.  32
    Platonism and Naturalism: The Possibility of Philosophy.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2020 - Ithaca [New York]: Cornell University Press.
    "An account of the central tradition in the history of philosophy, Platonism, along with the class of philosophical positions collectively known as Naturalism and the 'anti-Platonism' of Naturalism both in antiquity and in contemporary philosophy"--.
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  11.  17
    Knowing Persons: A Study in Plato.Lloyd Gerson - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (216):463-465.
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  12.  12
    The Cambridge history of philosophy in late antiquity.Lloyd P. Gerson (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Covers the philosophy of 200-800 CE and its place in literature, science, and religion. Includes a digest of all philosophical works known to have been written during the period.
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  13. Platonism and the invention of the problem of universals.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2004 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 86 (3):233-256.
    In this paper, I explore the origins of the ‘problem of universals’. I argue that the problem has come to be badly formulated and that consideration of it has been impeded by falsely supposing that Platonic Forms were ever intended as an alternative to Aristotelian universals. In fact, the role that Forms are supposed by Plato to fulfill is independent of the function of a universal. I briefly consider the gradual mutation of the problem in the Academy, in Alexander of (...)
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  14. God and Greek philosophy: studies in the early history of natural theology.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1990 - New York: Routledge.
    THE PRE-SOCRATIC ORIGINS OF NATURAL THEOLOGY § INTRODUCTION St Augustine informs us that pagan philosophers divided theology into three parts: () civic ...
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  15. The Unity of Intellect in Aristotle's De Anima.Lloyd Gerson - 2004 - Phronesis 49 (4):348-373.
    Desperately difficult texts inevitably elicit desperate hermeneutical measures. Aristotle's De Anima, book three, chapter five, is evidently one such text. At least since the time of Alexander of Aphrodisias, scholars have felt compelled to draw some remarkable conclusions regarding Aristotle's brief remarks in this passage regarding intellect. One such claim is that in chapter five, Aristotle introduces a second intellect, the so-called 'agent intellect', an intellect distinct from the 'passive intellect', the supposed focus of discussion up until this passage.1 This (...)
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  16.  40
    What are the Objects of Dianoia?Lloyd P. Gerson - 2018 - Plato Journal 18:45-53.
    In this paper, I examine the problem of the so-called Mathematical Objects within the context of the Divided Line. I argue that Plato believes that there are such objects but their distinctness and the mode of cognition relative to them can only be understood in relation to the superordinate, unhypothetical first principle of all, the Idea of the Good. The objects of mathematics or διάνοια are, unlike the objects of intellection or νόησις, cognized independently of the Good.
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  17. The perennial value of Platonism.Lloyd Gerson - 2020 - In Alexander J. B. Hampton & John Peter Kenney (eds.), Christian Platonism: A History. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  18. The Cambridge Companion to Plotinus.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1996 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 61 (1):159-160.
    Each volume of this series of companions to major philosophers contains specially commissioned essays by an international team of scholars, together with a substantial bibliography, and will serve as a reference work for students and non-specialists. One aim of the series is to dispel the intimidation such readers often feel when faced with the work of a difficult and challenging thinker. Plotinus was the greatest philosopher in the 700-year period between Aristotle and Augustine. He thought of himself as a disciple (...)
     
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  19. Plotinus's Metaphysics: Emanation or Creation?Lloyd P. Gerson - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (3):559 - 574.
    ONE FREQUENTLY READS CASUAL REFERENCES to Neo-Platonic metaphysics as emanationist. It is somewhat less common to find analyses of the term "emanation" so used. In this paper I shall be concerned solely with Plotinus. I hereby set aside all questions regarding any common denominator one might suppose between Plotinus and, say, Proclus.
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  20. John scotus eriugena.Wayne Hankey & Lloyd P. Gerson - 2010 - In Lloyd P. Gerson (ed.), The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 2--829.
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  21.  52
    Harold Cherniss and the Study of Plato Today.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (3):397-409.
    There are, very broadly speaking, two interpretative approaches to the study of Plato. Let us call the first the “Protestant” approach and the second the “Catholic” approach. According to the first, the fundamental principle of interpretation is sola scriptura, adherence to the texts of the dialogues as the only vehicle providing access to Plato’s philosophy. On this approach, putative evidence for Plato’s thinking drawn from Academic testimony or the indirect tradition is to be either excluded altogether or, if given any (...)
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  22.  35
    Socrates' Absolutist Prohibition of Wrongdoing.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1997 - Apeiron 30 (4):1 - 11.
  23.  17
    Ontology in Early Neoplatonism. Plotinus, Porphyry, Iamblichus. By Riccardo Chiaradonna.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2024 - Ancient Philosophy 44 (1):277-281.
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  24. What is platonism?Lloyd P. Gerson - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):253-276.
    The question posed in the title of this paper is an historical one. I am not, for example, primarily interested in the term 'Platonism' as used by modern philosophers to stand for a particular theory under discussion – a theory, which it is typically acknowledged, no one may have actually held.1 I am rather concerned to understand and articulate on an historical basis the core position of that 'school' of thought prominent in antiquity from the time of the 'founder' up (...)
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  25.  60
    The ‘Holy Solemnity’ of Forms and the Platonic Interpretation of Sophist.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):291-304.
  26.  17
    Aristotle: critical assessments.Lloyd P. Gerson (ed.) - 1999 - New York: Routledge.
    This set reprints key articles on Aristotle's logic, metaphysics, physics, cosmology, biology, psychology, ethics, politics, rhetoric, and aesthetics, discussing the major issues of concern in contemporary Aristotelian scholarship.
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  27. The Recollection Argument Revisited.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1999 - Apeiron 32 (4):1 - 15.
  28. The Heirs of Plato: A Study of the Old Academy.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2004 - Mind 113 (449):168-171.
  29. Platonic knowledge and the standard analysis.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (4):455 – 474.
    In this paper I explore Plato's reasons for his rejection of the so-called standard analysis of knowledge as justified true belief. I argue that Plato held that knowledge is an infallible mental state in which (a) the knowable is present in the knower and (b) the knower is aware of this presence. Accordingly, knowledge (epistm) is non-propositional. Since there are no infallible belief states, the standard analysis, which assumes that knowledge is a type of belief, cannot be correct. In addition, (...)
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  30.  17
    The ‘Holy Solemnity’ of Forms and the Platonic Interpretation of Sophist.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):291-304.
  31. Epistrophe pros heauton: History and Meaning.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1997 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 8:1-32.
    In primo luogo l'A. distingue fra autoevidenza, autoriflessività e introspezione. Esamina poi il tema dell'auto-riflessività in Platone, Aristotele, Plotino e Proclo. Nell'ultima parte dello studio illustra il tema nel pensiero di Agostino - distinguendo l'auto-riflessività dall'argomento si fallor sum - nello Pseudo Dionigi - soffermandosi sul commento dell'Aquinate al passaggio del De divinis nominibus sul movimento circolare dell'anima - e infine nella versione latina del Liber de causis.
     
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  32.  52
    Knowledge and Being in the Recollection Argument.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1999 - Apeiron 32 (4):1-16.
  33.  38
    Plato’s Rational Souls.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 68 (1):37-59.
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  34.  49
    The Myth of Plato’s Socratic Period.Lloyd Gerson - 2014 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 96 (4):403-430.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie Jahrgang: 96 Heft: 4 Seiten: 403-430.
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  35.  11
    Neoplatonic Philosophy: Introductory Readings.Lloyd Gerson & John M. Dillon - 2004 - Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Press.
    The most comprehensive collection of Neoplatonic writings available in English, this volume provides translations of the central texts of four major figures of the Neoplatonic tradition: Plotinus, Porphyry, Iamblichus, and Proclus. The general Introduction gives an overview of the period and takes a brief but revealing look at the history of ancient philosophy from the viewpoint of the Neoplatonists. Historical background--essential for understanding these powerful, difficult, and sometimes obscure thinkers--is provided in extensive footnotes, which also include cross-references to other works (...)
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  36.  40
    Plotinus on Happiness.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2012 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1).
  37.  24
    The Study of Plotinus Today.Lloyd P. Gerson - 1997 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 71 (3):293-300.
  38. The ‘Neoplatonic’ Interpretation of Plato’s Parmenides.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2016 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 10 (1):65-94.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 65 - 94 In his highly influential 1928 article ‘The _Parmenides_ of Plato and the Origin of the Neoplatonic “One”,’ E.R. Dodds argued, _inter alia_, that among the so-called Neoplatonists Plotinus was the first to interpret Plato’s _Parmenides_ in terms of the distinctive three ‘hypostases’, One, Intellect, and Soul. Dodds argued that this interpretation was embraced and extensively developed by Proclus, among others. In this paper, I argue that although Plotinus took _Parmenides_ to (...)
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  39. Platonic Hylomorphism.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2022 - Rhizomata 10 (1):26-57.
    Hylomorphism is almost universally claimed to be a staple doctrine of Aristotle. In this paper, I discuss a wide range of texts from the dialogues of Plato that straightforwardly display hylomorphism. Both Plato and Aristotle rest their cognitive realism on their hylomorphism. The crucial difference between Aristotle’s hylomorphism and Plato’s is that Aristotle believes that hylomorphism supports and is supported by essentialism whereas Plato does not. Plotinus presents arguments against Aristotle’s essentialism at the same time as he defends Platonic hylomorphism (...)
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  40. Intuition in Plato and the Platonic tradition.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 31 (4):579-596.
    In this paper, I examine what is for Plato and all those who follow in his footsteps the ne plus ultra of cognition, namely, intuition (nous or noēsis). This is the paradigm of cognition, meaning that all forms of human (and even animal) cognition are inferior manifestations of this. Intuition is mental seeing, analogous to physical seeing. Among embodied souls, it is seeing a unity of some sort manifested in some diversity or plurality. Thus, someone who sees that the Morning (...)
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  41.  7
    The Cambridge Companion to Plotinus.Lloyd P. Gerson (ed.) - 1996 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Each volume of this series of companions to major philosophers contains specially commissioned essays by an international team of scholars, together with a substantial bibliography, and will serve as a reference work for students and non-specialists. One aim of the series is to dispel the intimidation such readers often feel when faced with the work of a difficult and challenging thinker. Plotinus was the greatest philosopher in the 700-year period between Aristotle and Augustine. He thought of himself as a disciple (...)
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  42.  17
    Graceful reason: essays in ancient and medieval philosophy presented to Joseph Owens, CSSR on the occasion of his seventy-fifth birthday and the fiftieth anniversary of his ordination.Joseph Owens & Lloyd P. Gerson - 1983 - PIMS.
  43. Plato on Identity, Sameness, and Difference.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2004 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):305 - 332.
    Among the concepts central to Plato's metaphysical vision are those of identity, sameness, and difference. For example, it is on the basis of a claim about putative cases of sameness among different things that Plato postulates the existence of separate Forms. It is owing to the apparent sameness between instances of Forms and the Forms themselves that Plato is compelled somehow to take account of potentially destructive vicious infinite regress arguments. Further, in reflecting on the Forms and their relations among (...)
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  44.  4
    The Aristotelian Commentaries and Platonism.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2014 - Quaestiones Disputatae 4 (2):7-23.
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  45.  13
    Platonic ethics in later antiquity.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 129.
    This chapter examines the ethical theories of Platonists in later Antiquity. The focus is on Plotinus, given that later Platonists follow him in his exposition of the Platonic position. The chapter also discusses how Plotinus's pupil, Porphyry, and later Platonists systematized his account of virtue. It is argued that the fundamental truth contained in the Platonic interpretation of Plato's ethics is the refusal to foist upon Plato a facile view of human personhood. Platonists never for a moment supposed that Plato (...)
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  46.  28
    The Role of διάνοια in Plotinus’ Philosophy.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2022 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 17 (2):190-207.
    In this paper, I explore the centrality of διάνοια in Plotinus’ philosophy. Plotinus says that the real “we” is found to be the subject of διάνοια and “upwards.” This fundamental definition elicits several pressing questions. First, how is the subject of discursive reasoning related to the subject of appetitive and affective states? Second, how does the subject of discursive reasoning come to recognize its ultimate destiny as an undescended and disembodied intellect? Finally, why should we think that, as Plotinus says, (...)
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  47.  28
    Plotinus on Immortality and the Problem of Personal Identity.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2021 - In Immortality in Ancient Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 178-195.
    At first glance, Plotinus’ arguments for the immortality of the human soul, principally in Ennead IV 7 (2), constitute a straightforward defense of Plato against Peripatetic and Stoic attacks. And yet, his close reading of his predecessors, especially Aristotle and Alexander of Aphrodisias, led him to confront the following deep problem. The best arguments for immortality rest upon the immateriality of intellect and hence its immunity from destruction along with the body. But, following Aristotle, Plotinus maintains that the nature of (...)
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  48.  11
    The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity 2 Volume Paperback Set.Lloyd P. Gerson (ed.) - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity comprises over forty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of the period 200–800 CE. Designed as a successor to The Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Medieval Philosophy (edited by A. H. Armstrong), it takes into account some forty years of scholarship since the publication of that volume. The contributors examine philosophy as it entered literature, science and religion, and offer new and extensive assessments of philosophers who until recently (...)
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  49.  35
    Aristotle and Neoplatonism in Late Antiquity: Interpretations of the "De Anima" (review).Lloyd P. Gerson - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (2):315-316.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Aristotle and Neoplatonism in Late Antiquity: Interpretations of the “De Anima.” by H.J. BlumenthalLloyd P. GersonH.J. Blumenthal. Aristotle and Neoplatonism in Late Antiquity: Interpretations of the “De Anima.” Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1996. Pp. x + 244. Cloth, $57.50.The label ‘Neoplatonism’, coined in the eighteenth century to indicate a putative and rather ill-defined development within the Platonic tradition, is to this day applied in sundry ways. Presumably, ‘Neoplatonic’ (...)
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  50.  26
    A Distinction in Plato's "Sophist".Lloyd P. Gerson - 1986 - Modern Schoolman 63 (4):251-266.
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