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Summary

Titus Lucretius Carus (c. 99 – 55 BC) was a Roman poet and philosopher. He is author of the Latin epic poem De rerum natura (On the Nature of Things), comprised of six books in hexameter verse that address topics in Epicurean philosophy, including the atomic theory, the nature of the gods, freewill and determinism, the nature of mind and soul, sensation and thought, cosmogony, how the physical world is ordered and regulated, and the development of human civilization. The poem is a key source for our knowledge of Epicureanism and it had a major impact on Western thought in the Enlightenment and early modern period.

Key works

The most accessible English translation of Lucretius’ De rerum natura, with facing Latin text, is the Loeb edition of W. H. D. Rouse (revised M . F. Smith) Rouse 1975. There is also a verse translation by R. Melville in the Oxford World’s Classics Series with a good introduction by D. P. Fowler Melville & Fowler 1999. The collected papers in Algra et al 1997, Gale 2007, and Gillespie & Hardie 2007 highlight a range of literary and philosophical approaches to Lucretius.

Introductions David Sedley offers the best introductory article on Lucretius Sedley 2013.  
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1223 found
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  1. Lucretian Dido: A Stichometric Allusion.Sergio Casali - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-4.
    In the fourth line of her first speech in Book 1, to Ilioneus and the Trojan castaways, Dido quotes the first word of the first line of Lucretius’ De rerum natura, and in the fourth line of her second speech, to Aeneas, she quotes the first words of the second line of the De rerum natura. This is not a coincidence but a signal of the importance of Lucretius and Epicureanism for the characterization of Dido in the Aeneid.
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  2. Lucretius’ Razor on Epicurus’ Atomic Theory.Alberto Corrado - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-9.
    This article investigates why Lucretius does not dedicate any section of his poem to atomic size or provide a technical term to describe the concept. This absence is particularly significant because Epicurus’ Letter to Herodotus both uses the term μέγεθος to indicate atomic size and contains a passage reporting specifically on this property. First, the article argues that atomic size and shape are causally redundant in Epicurus’ ontology. Second, it demonstrates that the origin of both shape and size is found (...)
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  3. Science and Philosophy in Titus Lucvetius Carus.Emil DumitraŞcu - forthcoming - Annals of the University of Craiova, Series: Philosophy:89-96.
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  4. Lucretius 6.391: An Emendation.Boris Kayachev - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-3.
    This article argues that at Lucr. 6.391 (icti flammas ut fulguris halent) fulguris is a corruption, and proposes to read sulpuris instead. While the case against fulguris may in itself not be incontrovertible, the advantages of sulpuris include the acquisition of a new Homeric intertext in Il. 8.135 δεινὴ δὲ φλὸξ ὦρτο θεείου καιομένοιο.
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  5. Michel Serres and the Rhythms of the Flow – Part 2.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter Rhuthmic ontology Having set up the larger scientific frame, Serres introduced Lucretius' ontology. He did not pay attention to the atoms themselves but it is worth noticing that Lucretius described them as endowed with various size, weight, and “shape” which was an accurate translation of the Democritean rhuthmós. Serres started from Book 2 where the concept of clinamen – declination was introduced as “depellere paulum, tantum quod - Physique – Nouvel article.
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  6. Michel Serres and the Rhythms of the Flow – Part 3.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter Rhuthmic Perception Theory At the juncture point between ontology and knowledge was the soul. According to Lucretius, the soul consisted of two parts: the animus, located in the chest, which commanded intellectual operations and will, and the anima which was spread throughout the body, received perceptions and transmitted in turn the impulses of the command center. The soul in both aspects could be shown to be corporeal. To make it short, anthropology could be - Physique – Nouvel article.
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  7. review of Lucretius and the Early Modern.Charles T. Wolfe - forthcoming - The Classical Review.
    long version of review forthcoming in much shorter version in Classical Review.
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  8. Fragments, plinths and shattered bricks: Deleuze and atomism.Yannis Chatzantonis - 2023 - la Deleuziana 1 (15):39-45.
    There are two links that stand in the foreground of Deleuze’s treatment of Epicurus and Lucretius: the themes of immanent naturalism and of the externality of ontological relations. However, the links are problematised in Difference and Repetition, which presents an important critique of the concept of the atom. I will argue that this critique reveals the limits of the intellectual affinity between ancient atomism and Deleuzian metaphysics; in particular, that Deleuze’s notions of relationality and spatium respond to problems raised by (...)
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  9. A enfermidade do amor em Lucrécio e Catulo.José Carlos Silva de Almeida - 2023 - ARGUMENTOS - Revista de Filosofia 29:264-275.
    O presente artigo aponta que tanto Lucrécio quanto Catulo entendem o amor passional como uma enfermidade, assim como coincidem nas descrições de tal doença em todas as suas etapas. O que é então que os separa? Onde está a confrontação entre eles? A resposta se encontra na atitude que cada um adota diante da enfermidade. Enquanto Lucrécio considera o amor passional como algo reprovável e que há de ser evitado ouvindo a razão, Catulo, ainda que esteja consciente dos efeitos negativos (...)
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  10. Review & Reply. Review of Gonçalves, R.T. (tr.) Lucrécio. Sobre a Natureza das Coisas(2021).Renata Cazarini de Freitas & Rodrigo Tadeu Gonçalves - 2023 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 33:03302-03302.
    Review & Reply. Review of Gonçalves, R.T. (tr.) Lucrécio. Sobre a Natureza das Coisas(2021).
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  11. Tradición Lucreciana.Serafín Bodelón García - 2023 - Eikasia Revista de Filosofía 117:357-405.
    Se realiza un recorrido por las fuentes, tanto de la tradición directa de Lucrecio como de la tradición indirecta. Se establece una relación jerárquica de las fuentes y la dependencia entre sí.
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  12. Death: The asymmetry mystery.Alan H. Goldman - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (8):798-805.
    As the Roman philosopher Lucretius asked, why do we fear and regret death, but do not regret not having been born earlier, when death and prenatal nonexistence are mirror images? Both deprive us of goods we might have had, and this deprivation most plausibly explains the badness of death. This paper first considers and rejects explanations other than the deprivation of goods. It then suggests an explanation in terms of a state of which death deprives us, and which is itself (...)
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  13. AN UNUSUAL INTERPRETATION OF LUCRETIUS - (T.) Nail Lucretius III. A History of Motion. Pp. x + 217, ills. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2022. Paper, £14.99 (Cased, £95). ISBN: 978-1-4744-6424-6 (978-1-4744-6423-9 hbk). [REVIEW]Elena Nicoli - 2023 - The Classical Review 73 (2):512-514.
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  14. The Epicureanism of Lucretius.Tim O'Keefe - 2023 - In Gretchen Reydams-Schils, Myrto Garani & David Konstan (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 143-158.
    What is distinctive about Lucretius’s version of Epicureanism? The answer might appear to be “nothing,” for two reasons. First, Epicureanism in general is doctrinally conservative, with followers of Epicurus claiming to follow his authority. Second, Lucretius claims to be merely transmitting the arguments of his beloved master Epicurus in a pleasing manner. I argue that these considerations do not prevent De Rerum Natura from presenting a distinct version of Epicureanism. Its arguments in physics are almost certainly drawn from Epicurus himself. (...)
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  15. Honey and the Indecency of Epicurus’ aurea dicta_( _DRN 3.12).Michael Pope - 2023 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 167 (2):214-235.
    In this article the aurea dicta of Epicurus (DRN 3.12) are placed in conversation with larger discourses related to apian, floral, and honey imagery. Within these literary contexts, bees and honey are often associated with morally suspect appetites, effeminacy, and potentially dangerous erotic entanglements. Lucretius, I argue, seems to allude to these risky literary valences and manipulates them for his own poetic and rhetorical ends. Honey, we discover, is much more than a sugary substance.
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  16. THE LANGUAGE OF DE RERUM NATURA- (B.) Taylor Lucretius and the Language of Nature. Pp. xii + 223. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020. Cased, £66, US$88. ISBN: 978-0-19-875490-9. [REVIEW]Michael Pope - 2023 - The Classical Review 73 (2):510-512.
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  17. Epicureans on Death and Lucretius’ Squandering Argument.Scott Aikin - 2022 - Southwest Philosophy Review 38 (1):41-49.
    Lucretius follows his symmetry argument that one should not fear death with a dialectical strategy, the squandering argument. The dialectical presumption behind the squandering argument is that its audience is not an Epicurean, so squanders their life. The question is whether the squandering argument works on lives that by Epicurean standards are not squandered.
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  18. Lucretius Postmodernity Epicureanism and Atomism.Irfan Ajvazi - 2022 - Idea Books.
    Abstract: Lucretius made it plain that his poem was designed to liberate man from superstition, the fear of death and the tyranny of priests: \"When man’s life lay for all to see foully groveling upon the ground, crushed, which displayed her head from the regions of heaven, lowering over mortals with horrible aspect, a man of Greece was the first that dared to uplift mortal eyes against her. . . . but all the more they goaded the eager courage of (...)
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  19. ¿Qué es “Venus”? Una nueva investigación sobre De rerum natura I.1-49.Julián Barenstein - 2022 - Hybris, Revista de Filosofí­A 13 (1):121-150.
    In this research I propose to bring to light the meaning of "Venus" in the invocation of Lucretius´s De rerum natura. This paper is divided into six parts. In the first, I give an account of the various interpretations of the invocation and I systematize them. In the second I analyze and discuss three incategorizable investigations. In the third and fourth parts I expose the epicurean concepts of pleasure and divinity respectively. In the fifth I look for the terms, by (...)
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  20. Lucretius’Un Doğa Felsefesi̇.Irmak Çetik - 2022 - Dissertation, Ankara Üniversitesi
    İÖ 99 ve 55 yılları arasında yaşamış olan Romalı şair Titus Lucretius Carus’un hayatı boyunca vermiş olduğu tek eser De Rerum Natura, Epikuros felsefesini son derece kapsamlı bir şekilde konu edinmesi ve öğretilerin her kesimden okuyucunun anlayabileceği türden basit bir dille aktarılması bakımından adeta Epikurosçuluğun kutsal kitabı niteliğindedir. Epikuros’un doğa felsefesini öğrenebildiğimiz Herodotos’a Mektup adlı çalışması, biyografi yazarı Diogenes Laertios’un aktarımı sayesinde günümüze ulaşmıştır, ancak mektup bir özet niteliğindedir.
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  21. Curing Virtue: Epicureanism and Erotic Fantasy in Machiavelli’s Mandragola.Michelle T. Clarke - 2022 - Political Theory 50 (6):913-938.
    Who is Lucrezia, the mysterious woman at the center of Machiavelli’s comic play Mandragola? And why is she deemed “fit to govern a kingdom”? This article revisits these questions with attention to Mandragola’s sophisticated, and often irreverent, allusions to Roman source materials. While scholars have long recognized that Mandragola draws on Roman history and drama, its sustained engagement with Lucretian and Ovidian poetry has gone largely unnoticed. In what follows, I trace these allusions and show how Machiavelli uses them to (...)
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  22. Ennius and lucretius - (j.S.) Nethercut ennius noster: Lucretius and the annales. Pp. X + 260. New York: Oxford university press, 2021. Cased, £64, us$99. Isbn: 978-0-19-751769-7. [REVIEW]Jay Fisher - 2022 - The Classical Review 72 (1):136-138.
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  23. Lucretius, the Atomists, and the Greek etymology of manare.Alex Hardie - 2022 - Hermes 150 (2):237.
    Lucretius’ juxtapositions of (per)manare (‘percolate’) and rarus (‘porous’), with reference to atomistic permeability and the ‘void’, imply derivation of manare from μανός (‘porous’). The ‘etymology’ thus created acknowledges a scientific debt to the early Atomists. It was later promulgated in Verrius’ De Significatu Verborum and is reflected, with echoes of Lucretius, in Horace’s programmatic Odes 4.1.
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  24. The Erotics of Materialism: Lucretius and Early Modern Poetics by Jessie Hock.Philip Hardie - 2022 - American Journal of Philology 143 (1):181-185.
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  25. Amicus Lucretius: Gassendi, il de Rerum natura e l'edonismo cristiano.Enrico Piergiacomi - 2022 - Boston: De Gruyter.
    The book provides the first systematic reconstruction of the reception of Lucretius' theological and ethical verses in the work of the early modern philosopher Pierre Gassendi (1592-1655). It argues that the latter was the first to quote and dis.
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  26. Horror in Lucretius.Enrico Piergiacomi - 2022 - Philosophie Antique 22:39-63.
    Lucrèce débute son livre III du poème De rerum natura par l’éloge des enseignements d’Épicure - qui effacent la peur de la mort, des fantômes et des dieux - et la description des sentiments suscités par les principes épicuriens. Il écrit, dans les vers 28-30, qu’il ressent à la fois une volupté divine (divina voluptas), allusion probable au plaisir catastématique qui permet d’approcher la quiétude de la divinité, et l’horreur (horror). La formule est énigmatique, voire même contradictoire. En effet les (...)
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  27. A Brief Note on religio and the Ending of De Rerum Natura.Michael Pope - 2022 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 166 (1):150-155.
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  28. The reception of lucretius in italy - (f.) citti, (d.) pellacani (edd.) Ragione E furore. Lucrezio nell'italia contemporanea. Pp. cii + 248, b/w & colour pls. Bologna: Pendragon, 2020. Paper, €28. Isbn: 978-88-3364-203-1. [REVIEW]Valentina Prosperi - 2022 - The Classical Review 72 (1):138-141.
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  29. Lucretius’ prolepsis.Chiara Rover - 2022 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 43 (2):279-314.
    This paper aims to investigate the equivalent of Epicurus’ πρόληψις, the second criterion of the Epicurean Canonic (DL X 31 = fr. 35 Usener), in Lucretius’ De rerum natura (DRN). Taking stock of the several occurrences of the Latin terms notitia and notities in the six books of the poem, I show that Lucretius’ view about preconception remains faithful to Epicurus’ πρόληψις, and that the poet does not endorse a less empiricist position than his Master because of some influence of (...)
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  30. Marx, ciencia de la contingencia.Alejo Stark - 2022 - Res Pública. Revista de Historia de Las Ideas Políticas 25 (1):31-39.
    In his book On the Nature of Marx’s Things Jacques Lezra inherits another Marx and another materialism. It is an aleatory materialism: a materialism of the dynamic contingency of Marx and his “things”. This “subterranean current” of aleatory materialism is excavated by Lezra in his swerve through the letters, notebooks, and “private notes” of a young Marx working on his doctorate thesis. Following Lezra’s necrophilological thread –which encounters Lucretius and his “things”– we find that, in a parallel fashion, Marx is (...)
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  31. Homerus sceptra potitus (Lucr. 3,1037–1038). De rerum natura als Hinführung zur Homerlektüre?Dorothea Weber - 2022 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 166 (1):22-44.
    De rerum natura displays a particular closeness to the Homeric epics on various levels: in language, in arguments, and in the selection of examples. This closeness clearly goes beyond similarities arising from the affinity as determined by genre. Further, a couple of passages are veritable translations from the Iliad resp. the Odyssey. There, the attitude towards the pretext becomes especially clear. It ranges from acknowledgement to rejection and in some instances is brought about through the use of allegory. This attitude (...)
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  32. The Temporal Bias Approach to the Symmetry Problem and Historical Closeness.Huiyuhl Yi - 2022 - Philosophia 51 (3):1763-1781.
    In addressing the Lucretian symmetry problem, the temporal bias approach claims that death is bad because it deprives us of something about which it is rational to care (e.g., future pleasures), whereas prenatal nonexistence is not bad because it only deprives us of something about which it is rational to remain indifferent (e.g., past pleasures). In a recent contribution to the debate on this approach, Miguel and Santos argue that a late beginning can deprive us of a future pleasure. Their (...)
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  33. Lucretian Symmetry and the Content-Based Approach.Huiyuhl Yi - 2022 - Philosophia 50 (2):815-831.
    In addressing the Lucretian symmetry problem, the content-based approach attends to the difference between the contents of the actual life and those of relevant possible lives of a person. According to this approach, the contents of a life with an earlier beginning would substantially differ from, and thus be discontinuous with, the contents of the actual life, whereas the contents of a life with the same beginning but a later death would be continuous with the contents of the actual life. (...)
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  34. ‘In the Light of Leibniz and Lucretius’: An Encounter between Deleuze and New Materialism.Hanjo Berressem - 2021 - Deleuze and Guattari Studies 15 (4):497-522.
    While most new materialists, including Thomas Nail, tend to distance themselves from Deleuze, this essay reads the encounter of Nail's ‘process materialism’ and Deleuzian philosophy as productive rather than contentious. After tracing the affinities of their notions of continuity and discontinuity by way of Deleuze's The Fold: Leibniz and the Baroque and Nail's Lucretius I: An Ontology of Motion and Being and Motion, the essay considers Nail's unfolding of Lucretius’ luminous philosophy in relation to Deleuze's reading of Lucretius from within (...)
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  35. Qui capite ipse sua in statuit uestigia sese. Lucrezio e lo scetticismo nel libro IV del De rerum natura.Michele Corradi - 2021 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 42 (2):291-319.
    In his refutation of skepticism in book IV of De rerum natura, Lucretius uses argumentative methods typical of Epicurus: the περιτροπή is in many ways similar to that used by the philosopher in book XXV of Περὶ φύσεως, the same book where, in a passage dedicated to the criticism against determinists, can be found a reference to the criterion of the πρόληψις, that Lucretius exploits in his refutation. Moreover, Lucretius develops a strong demonstration concerning the irrefutability of αἴσθησις as a (...)
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  36. Prenatal and Posthumous Nonexistence: Lucretius on the Harmlessness of Death.Taylor Cyr - 2021 - In Erin Dolgoy, Kimberly Hurd Hale & Bruce Peabody (eds.), Political Theory on Death and Dying. Routledge. pp. 111-120..
    One of the most fascinating and continually debated arguments in the philosophical literature on the badness of death comes from the work of Lucretius (Titus Lucretius Carus, circa 99-55 BCE). This chapter will focus on Lucretius’s famous Symmetry Argument. I will begin by saying more about what exactly Epicureanism teaches about death — and why Epicureans thought it could not be bad. After that, I will provide the passage from Lucretius’s epic poem that includes his reasons for thinking that death (...)
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  37. Sexual Freedom and Feminine Pleasure in Lucretius.Julie Giovacchini - 2021 - In Isabelle Chouinard, Zoe McConaughey, Aline Medeiros Ramos & Roxane Noël (eds.), Women’s Perspectives on Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 103-121.
    From Book IV of Lucretius’s De Rerum Natura, we most often retain the severe criticism of the amorous feeling and the “traps of Venus.” However, two original aspects of the Lucretian denunciation of love, which I propose to study, are overlooked: on the one hand, the eulogy of the vagrant Venus, the volgivaga vagus Venere of verse 1071, an image of sexual infidelity that has become a philosophical virtue; on the other hand, the study of feminine pleasure—Lucretius acknowledges and values (...)
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  38. The Place of Death in Human Life.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 334–360.
    Throughout much of human history most people conceived of death as a transitional event. An alternative, secular, conception of death is as the permanent cessation of all life‐sustaining biological functions. The death of the physical organism is the death of the person or human being. However death be conceived, human beings are the only creatures that are aware of their mortality. The death penalty is often thought to be the most severe punishment of all, far worse than life imprisonment. Attitudes (...)
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  39. A Memorandum for Past Millennia: Excising the Plague from Lucretius's De rerum natura.Ryan Johnson - 2021 - In Casey Ford, Suzanne McCullagh & Karen Houle (eds.), Minor ethics: Deleuzian variations. McGill-Queen's University Press. pp. 107-127.
    In 1984, Harvard University asked Italo Calvino to deliver the next Charles Eliot Norton Lectures. After working obsessively for a year, Calvino died the day before he was to travel to Boston. Fortunately, Calvino had already written out all but one of the six planned lectures, which were framed as meditations on Lucretius. These are the titles of the five completed lectures: (1) “Lightness,” (2) “Quickness,” (3) “Exactitude,” (4) “Visibility,” (5) “Multiplicity.” The last lecture - worked out but unwritten - (...)
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  40. Death, Deprivation, and a Sartrean Account of Horror.Frederik Kaufman - 2021 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 103 (2):335-349.
    Deprivation offers a plausible explanation for the badness of death, so fear is not unreasonable. But horror at the prospect of one's death is not just extreme fear because horror is structurally different than fear. Horror requires a different explanation. For Sartre, horror is possible only in unique circumstances. I argue that Sartre's view, when combined with the subjective incomprehensibility of one's annihilation, can explain horror and other negative emotions that are not contingent on deprivation. Further, I argue that while (...)
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  41. Lucretius and satire - (t.H.m.) Gellar-Goad laughing atoms, laughing matter. Lucretius’ de rerum natura and satire. Pp. X + 280. Ann Arbor: University of michigan press, 2020. Cased, us$85. Isbn: 978-0-472-13180-8. [REVIEW]Jerome Kemp - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (1):95-97.
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  42. An Epicurean Community of Women: A Response to Julie Giovacchini.Natania Meeker - 2021 - In Isabelle Chouinard, Zoe McConaughey, Aline Medeiros Ramos & Roxane Noël (eds.), Women’s Perspectives on Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 123-129.
    This essay responds to Julie Giovacchini’s analysis of women’s pleasure in Lucretius’s De Rerum Natura. Lucretius has often been read as a heterodox thinker, but only rarely has his critique of human institutions and human ideologies been extended to include men’s control over women. Giovacchini shows how the preponderance of masculine and masculinist perspectives on Lucretius has rendered illegible or unspeakable the feminine dimensions of pleasure as Lucretius represents them. Her article provides a way back through a long history of (...)
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  43. The Moral Philosophy of Lucretius and Aquinas: Competing Ends and Means.Jason Nehez - 2021 - Studia Gilsoniana 10 (2):293–319.
    The author first explains wisdom and its importance to moral philosophy. Secondly, he follows with a consideration of the nature of things and the soul as told by Lucretius. Then he presents a brief summary on St. Thomas understanding of soul and how his faculty psychology is a superior explanation of moral philosophy. The author concludes by showing how Lucretius’ ethical system fails and to attain true happiness we must take up a faculty psychology aimed at virtue and the perfection (...)
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  44. A Note on the Ascription of Ennius, Annales 5 Skutsch.Jason S. Nethercut - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):891-894.
    This note adduces corroborating evidence for Skutsch's ascription of Enn.Ann. 5 to a description of the water cycle in the speech of Homer in the proem to theAnnales. Despite the flawed argumentation in Skutsch's presentation and despite a general reluctance among scholars to endorse his ascription, this note argues that his solution should remain part of the scholarly discussion, not least because there are aspects of Skutsch's argument that remain uncontested and because Lucretius seems to endorse this location of the (...)
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  45. Different perspectives on lucretius - (d.) O'Rourke (ed.) Approaches to lucretius. Traditions and innovations in reading the De Rerum Natura. Pp. XII + 326, ills. Cambridge: Cambridge university press, 2020. Cased, £75, us$99.99. Isbn: 978-1-108-42196-6. [REVIEW]Elena Nicoli - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (2):387-390.
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  46. The reception of lucretius - (p.R.) Hardie, (V.) prosperi, (d.) zucca (edd.) Lucretius poet and philosopher. Background and fortunes of de rerum natura. (Trends in classics supplementary volume 90.) pp. X + 403, b/w & colour ills. Berlin and boston: De gruyter, 2020. Cased, £118, €129.95, us$149.99. Isbn: 978-3-11-067347-0. [REVIEW]Alessio Panichi - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (1):97-100.
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  47. Lucretian Puzzles.Michael Rabenberg - 2021 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 8:110-140.
    It seems that people typically prefer dying later to dying earlier. It also seems that people typically do not prefer having been created earlier to having been created later. Lucretius’ Puzzle is the question whether anything typically rationally recommends having a preference for dying later to dying earlier over having a preference for having been created earlier to having been created later. In this paper, I distinguish among three ways in which Lucretius’ Puzzle can be understood and say how I (...)
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  48. Επιβολη τησ διανοιασ: Reflections on the fourth epicurean criterion of truth.Jan Maximilian Robitzsch - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):601-616.
    This paper discusses ἐπιβολαὶ τῆς διανοίας, which later Epicureans are supposed to have elevated to a fourth criterion of truth to complement perceptions, preconceptions and feelings. By examining Epicurus’ extant writings, the paper distinguishes three different senses of the term: ‘thought in general’, ‘act of attention’ and ‘mental perception’. It is argued that only the sense ‘mental perception’ yields a plausible reading of ἐπιβολαί as a criterion of truth. The paper then turns to the textual evidence on ἐπιβολαί in later (...)
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  49. The Pocket Epicurean.John Sellars - 2021 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    A short, smart guide to living the good life through the teachings of Epicurus. As long as there has been human life, we’ve searched for what it means to be happy. More than two thousand years ago, the Greek philosopher Epicurus came to his own conclusion: all we really want in life is pleasure. Though today we tend to associate the word “Epicurean” with indulgence in the form of food and wine, the philosophy of Epicurus was about a life well (...)
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  50. Retire with thanks: Rethinking lucretius 3.962.Tetsufumi Takeshita - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):895-897.
    This article aims at proposing a solution to one of the well-known textual cruces in Lucretius’ De rerum natura. After a brief survey of the suggested emendations, the author will shed some fresh light on Manning's gratus, which recent editors have curiously neglected. The idea that the old man should retire from life with thanks is not uncommon among classical writers. In addition, parallel expressions are also found in Epicurus’ own words. This article concludes that gratus is what we would (...)
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