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Summary

Titus Lucretius Carus (c. 99 – 55 BC) was a Roman poet and philosopher. He is author of the Latin epic poem De rerum natura (On the Nature of Things), comprised of six books in hexameter verse that address topics in Epicurean philosophy, including the atomic theory, the nature of the gods, freewill and determinism, the nature of mind and soul, sensation and thought, cosmogony, how the physical world is ordered and regulated, and the development of human civilization. The poem is a key source for our knowledge of Epicureanism and it had a major impact on Western thought in the Enlightenment and early modern period.

Key works

The most accessible English translation of Lucretius’ De rerum natura, with facing Latin text, is the Loeb edition of W. H. D. Rouse (revised M . F. Smith) Lucrèce et al 1975. There is also a verse translation by R. Melville in the Oxford World’s Classics Series with a good introduction by D. P. Fowler Melville & Fowler 1999. The collected papers in Algra et al 1997, Gale 2007, and Gillespie & Hardie 2007 highlight a range of literary and philosophical approaches to Lucretius.

Introductions David Sedley offers the best introductory article on Lucretius Sedley 2013.  
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1167 found
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  1. Deleuze and Ancient Atomism.Yannis Chatzantonis - manuscript
    A brief survey of Deleuze’s writings on ancient atomism and on the concept of the atom in general. Deleuze’s treatment of atomism is significant because it makes clear Deleuze’s aim in shifting the mereological vocabulary from points to lines; it shows what, in Deleuze’s sense, it means to unground. In other words, it sets down the conditions for a successful Deleuzian critique of essentialist metaphysics of structure.
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  2. The First Edition of Lucretius Reproduced. Beretta Lucrezio. De Rerum Natura, Editio Princeps . Pp. 62 + 208. Bologna: Bononia University Press, 2016. Paper, €150. Isbn: 978-88-6923-066-0. [REVIEW]David Butterfield - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
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  3. Science and Philosophy in Titus Lucvetius Carus.Emil DumitraŞcu - forthcoming - Annals of the University of Craiova, Series: Philosophy:89-96.
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  4. Michel Serres and the Rhythms of the Flow – Part 2.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter Rhuthmic ontology Having set up the larger scientific frame, Serres introduced Lucretius' ontology. He did not pay attention to the atoms themselves but it is worth noticing that Lucretius described them as endowed with various size, weight, and “shape” which was an accurate translation of the Democritean rhuthmós. Serres started from Book 2 where the concept of clinamen – declination was introduced as “depellere paulum, tantum quod - Physique – Nouvel article.
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  5. Michel Serres and the Rhythms of the Flow – Part 3.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter Rhuthmic Perception Theory At the juncture point between ontology and knowledge was the soul. According to Lucretius, the soul consisted of two parts: the animus, located in the chest, which commanded intellectual operations and will, and the anima which was spread throughout the body, received perceptions and transmitted in turn the impulses of the command center. The soul in both aspects could be shown to be corporeal. To make it short, anthropology could be - Physique – Nouvel article.
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  6. The Oxford Handbook to Epicurus and Epicureanism.Phillip Mitsis (ed.) - forthcoming - Oxford England: Oxford University Press.
    This volume offers authoritative discussions of all aspects of Epicurus's philosophy and then traces out some of its most important subsequent influences throughout the Western intellectual tradition. Such a detailed and comprehensive study of Epicureanism is especially timely given the tremendous current revival of interest in Epicurus and his rivals, the Stoics. The thirty-one contributions in this volume offer an unmatched resource for all those wishing to deepen their knowledge of Epicurus' powerful arguments about happiness, death, and the nature of (...)
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  7. Lucretius and Monsters in Advance.Vittorio Morfino - forthcoming - Philosophy Today.
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  8. The Epicureanism of Lucretius.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - In Gretchen Reydams-Schils, Myrto Garani & David Konstan (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    What is distinctive about Lucretius’s version of Epicureanism? The answer might appear to be “nothing,” for two reasons. First, Epicureanism in general is doctrinally conservative, with followers of Epicurus claiming to follow his authority. Second, Lucretius claims to be merely transmitting the arguments of his beloved master Epicurus in a pleasing manner. I argue that these considerations do not prevent De Rerum Natura from presenting a distinct version of Epicureanism. Its arguments in physics are almost certainly drawn from Epicurus himself. (...)
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  9. Επιβολη Τησ Διανοιασ: Reflections on the Fourth Epicurean Criterion of Truth.Jan Maximilian Robitzsch - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-16.
    This paper discusses ἐπιβολαὶ τῆς διανοίας, which later Epicureans are supposed to have elevated to a fourth criterion of truth to complement perceptions, preconceptions and feelings. By examining Epicurus’ extant writings, the paper distinguishes three different senses of the term: ‘thought in general’, ‘act of attention’ and ‘mental perception’. It is argued that only the sense ‘mental perception’ yields a plausible reading of ἐπιβολαί as a criterion of truth. The paper then turns to the textual evidence on ἐπιβολαί in later (...)
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  10. Objections to Jeremy Simon’s Response to Lucretius’s Symmetry Argument in Advance.Abe Witonsky & Sarah Whitman - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophical Research.
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  11. Review of Lucretius and the Early Modern.Charles T. Wolfe - forthcoming - The Classical Review.
    long version of review forthcoming in much shorter version in Classical Review.
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  12. Lucretius and Satire - (T.H.M.) Gellar-Goad Laughing Atoms, Laughing Matter. Lucretius’ de Rerum Natura and Satire. Pp. X + 280. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2020. Cased, Us$85. Isbn: 978-0-472-13180-8. [REVIEW]Jerome Kemp - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (1):95-97.
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  13. The Moral Philosophy of Lucretius and Aquinas: Competing Ends and Means.Jason Nehez - 2021 - Studia Gilsoniana 10 (2):293-319.
    The author first explains wisdom and its importance to moral philosophy. Secondly, he follows with a consideration of the nature of things and the soul as told by Lucretius. Then he presents a brief summary on St. Thomas understanding of soul and how his faculty psychology is a superior explanation of moral philosophy. The author concludes by showing how Lucretius’ ethical system fails and to attain true happiness we must take up a faculty psychology aimed at virtue and the perfection (...)
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  14. The Reception of Lucretius - (P.R.) Hardie, (V.) Prosperi, (D.) Zucca (Edd.) Lucretius Poet and Philosopher. Background and Fortunes of de Rerum Natura. (Trends in Classics Supplementary Volume 90.) Pp. X + 403, B/W & Colour Ills. Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, 2020. Cased, £118, €129.95, Us$149.99. Isbn: 978-3-11-067347-0. [REVIEW]Alessio Panichi - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (1):97-100.
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  15. After Lucretius.John Wilkinson - 2021 - Critical Inquiry 47 (S2):S89-S89.
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  16. Epicurus in Rome: Philosophical Perspectives in the Ciceronian Age.Sergio Yona & Gregson Davis (eds.) - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    The role of Greek thought in the final days of the Roman republic is a topic that has garnered much attention in recent years. This volume of essays, commissioned specially from a distinguished international group of scholars, explores the role and influence of Greek philosophy, specifically Epicureanism, in the late republic. It focuses primarily on the works and views of Cicero, premier politician and Roman philosopher of the day, and Lucretius, foremost among the representatives and supporters of Epicureanism at the (...)
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  17. Alcune osservazioni su naturae species ratioque nel De rerum natura di Lucrezio.Luca Beltramini - 2020 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 164 (2):308-331.
    The article proposes to re-examine the Lucretian formula naturae species ratioque, the meaning of which has prompted some critical debate. The examination begins from an analysis of rhetoric and argument in the sections in which the phrase occurs, with the goal of demonstrating that the meaning ‘rational vision of nature’ is more apt to the context and to Lucretius’ poetic and philosophical programme, which often relies on metaphors drawn from the semantic field of vision to describe the comprehension of natural (...)
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  18. A New Supplement to Diogenes of Oenoanda’s Fr. 6 Smith: A Case of Epicurean Language Selection.Alberto Corrado - 2020 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 164 (2):269-276.
    This paper intends to offer a new supplement to a corrupt passage of the Epicurean inscription of Oenoanda. Smith, in the lacuna of Fr. 6, uses the phrasal term πρῶτα σώματα to indicate the atoms. The supplement is not satisfying as it is based solely on evidence drawn from non-Epicurean texts and Lucretius, who writes in Latin and is not always reliable for reconstructing the Epicurean terminology. In this article, I will try to demonstrate that πρῶτα σώματα is in fact (...)
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  19. Mixed Bodies, Agency and Narrative in Lucretius and Machiavelli.Sean Erwin - 2020 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):337-355.
    Scholars have cited the influence of Lucretius on Machiavelli as important to framing Machiavelli’s position on the freedom of political agents. Some scholars like Roecklin and Rahe argue that Machiavelli was a determinist based on Machiavelli’s rejection of the clinamen; others argue with Brown and Morfino that Machiavelli’s affirmation of Lucretian natural principles left room for the freedom of agents. However, this paper takes a different approach by arguing that Machiavelli successfully resists identification with either of these positions. I argue (...)
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  20. Letters and Writing in Ancient Rome - (S.A.) Frampton Empire of Letters. Writing in Roman Literature and Thought From Lucretius to Ovid. Pp. XIV + 206, Ills. New York: Oxford University Press, 2019. Cased, £47.99, Us$74. Isbn: 978-0-19-091540-7. [REVIEW]T. E. Franklinos - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):392-394.
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  21. Crafting Chaos: Intelligent Design in Ovid, Metamorphoses Book 1 and Plato's Timaeus.Peter Kelly - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (2):734-748.
    Many attempts have been made to define the precise philosophical outlook of Ovid's account of cosmogony from the beginning of the Metamorphoses, while numerous different and interconnected influences have been identified including Homer, Hesiod, Empedocles, Apollonius Rhodius, Lucretius and Virgil. This has led some scholars to conclude that Ovid's cosmogony is simply eclectic, a magpie collection of various poetic and philosophical snippets haphazardly jumbled together, and with no significant philosophical dimension whatsoever. A more constructive approach could see Ovid's synthesis of (...)
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  22. Health and Hedonism in Plato and Epicurus by Kelly Arenson.David Konstan - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):401-402.
    Epicurus had a distinctive position on pleasure: the greatest possible pleasure consists in the absence of pain. The pain in question may be physical or psychological. Not to be hungry, cold, or otherwise distressed is the greatest pleasure that the body can know; to be free of fear, particularly the kind of vague, undirected anxiety that Lucretius called cura, is the most pleasant state that the mind can achieve. As Lucretius exclaims, "Do you not see that our nature cries out (...)
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  23. Our Atoms, Ourselves: Lucretius on the Psychology of Personal Identity.Maeve Lentricchia - 2020 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 41 (2):297-328.
    In Epicurean cosmology, material reconstitution, or palingenesis is the necessary consequence of the infinity of time and the eternity of atoms. I examine Lucretius’ treatment of this phenomenon and consider the extent to which his view enables us to develop an Epicurean response to the question: what makes a person at two different times one and the same person? I offer a reading of this passage in the light of modern accounts of persistence and identity, and what Lucretius states in (...)
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  24. Penser les Fondements de l'Éthique Sociale Dans les Deux Derniers Siècles de la République Romaine.Carlos Lévy - 2020 - Philosophical Readings 12.
    The purpose of this article is to analyze how the reflection on the origins of the civilization was developed in Rome, at the end of the Republic, in a city where during centuries, nobody tried to go beyond this point of absolute origin that was the foundation of the Vrbs. In order to explore not only Cicéro’s philosophic reflection, but also his rhetorical texts, especially the De inuentione, which contains at the beginning of its first book a very interesting explanatory (...)
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  25. Lucretius and the Philosophical Use of Literary Persuasion.Tim O'Keefe - 2020 - In Donncha O'Rourke (ed.), Approaches to Lucretius: traditions and innovations in reading De Rerum Natura. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 177-194.
    The first part of this paper looks into the question of Lucretius’ philosophical sources and whether he draws almost exclusively from Epicurus himself or also from later Epicurean texts. I argue that such debates are inconclusive and likely will remain so, even if additional Epicurean texts are discovered, and that even if we were able to ascertain Lucretius’ philosophical sources, doing so would add little to our understanding of the De Rerum Natura. The second part of the paper turns to (...)
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  26. Approaches to Lucretius: Traditions and Innovations in Reading the de Rerum Natura.Donncha O'Rourke (ed.) - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    Both in antiquity and ever since the Renaissance Lucretius' De Rerum Natura has been admired – and condemned – for its startling poetry, its evangelical faith in materialist causation, and its seductive advocacy of the Epicurean good life. Approaches to Lucretius assembles an international team of classicists and philosophers to take stock of a range of critical approaches to which this influential poem has given rise and which in turn have shaped its interpretation, including textual criticism, the text's strategies for (...)
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  27. Review of George Santayana, Three Philosophical Poets – Lucretius, Dante, and Goethe. [REVIEW]Daniel Pinkas - 2020 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 12 (2).
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  28. Epicurean Philosophy and Its Parts.Clerk Shaw - 2020 - In Kelly Arenson (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy. pp. 13-24.
    This chapter offers an overview of the Epicurean conception of philosophy, with special attention to the value of physics. The Epicureans value physics not only for its ability to help remove superstitious beliefs about the gods and death, but also for its ability to stabilize our beliefs and to give causal accounts of ethically-relevant kinds such as pleasure and desire.
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  29. Lucretius and the Language of Nature.Barnaby Taylor - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    Lucretius' Epicurean poem De Rerum Natura made a fundamental and lasting contribution to the language of Latin philosophy. In this book Barnaby Taylor offers an in-depth reconstruction of core features of Epicurean linguistic theory, and a new understanding of Lucretius' linguistic innovation and creativity.
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  30. Memmius, Cicero and Lucretius: A Note on Cic. Fam. 13.1.Christopher V. Trinacty - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (1):440-443.
    A recent piece in this journal by Morgan and Taylor made the case that C. Memmius is not to be seen as an active prosecutor of Epicureanism but rather as an Epicurean himself, who merely has disagreed with the grimly orthodox Epicurean sect in Athens. As such, Memmius’ building intentions for Epicurus’ home could have been to create an honorary monument or possibly even construct a grander locus for pilgrimage and the practice of Epicureanism. This note adds to their findings (...)
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  31. Freedom as Overcoming the Fear of Death: Epicureanism in the Subtitle of Spinoza’s Theological Political Treatise.Dimitris Vardoulakis - 2020 - Parrhesia 32:33-60.
    It is often put forward that the entire political project of epicureanism consists in the overcoming of fear, whereby its scope is deemed to be very narrow. I argue that the overcoming of the fear of death should actually be linked to a conception of freedom in epicureanism. This idea is further developed by Spinoza, who defines the free man as one who thinks of death least of all in the Ethics, and who develops this idea more in the Theological (...)
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  32. Hobbes or Spinoza? Two Epicurean Versions of the Social Contract.Dimitris Vardoulakis - 2020 - InCircolo - Rivista di Filosofia E Culture 9:186-210.
    I argue that both Hobbes and Spinoza rely on a pivot epicurean idea to form their conceptions of the social contract, namely, the idea that the human acts by calculating their utility. However, Hobbes and Spinoza employ this starting principle in different ways. For Hobbes, this only makes sense if the calculation of utility is regulated by fear as the primary political emotion. For Spinoza, there is no primary emotion and the entire construction of the social contract relies on how (...)
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  33. Spinoza, the Epicurean: Authority and Utility in Materialism.Dimitris Vardoulakis - 2020 - Edinburgh, UK: Edinburgh University Press.
    Through a radical new reading of the Theological Political Treatise, Dimitris Vardoulakis argues that the major source of Spinoza’s materialism is the Epicurean tradition that re-emerges in modernity when manuscripts by Epicurus and Lucretius are rediscovered. This reconsideration of Spinoza’s political project, set within a historical context, lays the ground for an alternative genealogy of materialism. Central to this new reading of Spinoza are the theory of practical judgment (understood as the calculation of utility) and its implications for a theory (...)
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  34. Why Is Spinoza an Epicurean?Dimitris Vardoulakis - 2020 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):389-409.
    The article argues that Spinoza’s political philosophy is best understood by tracing the influence of epicureanism in his thought.
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  35. Die Ordnung der Welt: Darstellungsformen von Dynamik, Statik Und Emergenz in Lukrez' De Rerum Natura by Eva Marie Noller.Francesco Verde - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (3):610-611.
    According to a testimony of Sextus Empiricus's Against the Physicists, Epicurus began to study philosophy because his grammar teacher, dealing with the birth of Chaos in Hesiod's Theogony, was not able to explain what the cause and origin of Chaos were. If this evidence is reliable, the question of disorder was extremely significant for Epicurean philosophy. Usually, ancient pagan and Christian critics of materialistic philosophies accused Democritus and Epicurus of denying the power of providence. To Dante, Democritus is the philosopher (...)
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  36. Lucretius’ Use of the Name Iphianassa.Robert Brown - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):715-724.
    The name Iphianassa occurs only once in Latin literature—in the proem to De Rerum Natura. Here Lucretius illustrates the evils of religion with a description of Iphianassa's sacrifice at Aulis :illud in his rebus uereor, ne forte rearisimpia te rationis inire elementa uiamqueindugredi sceleris. quod contra saepius illareligio peperit scelerosa atque impia facta.Aulide quo pacto Triuiai uirginis aramIphianassai turparunt sanguine foedeductores Danaum delecti, prima uirorum.cui simul infula uirgineos circumdata comptusex utraque pari malarum parte profusast,et maestum simul ante aras adstare parentemsensit (...)
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  37. Lucretius and Spinoza or Clinamen and Conatus.Pedro Mauricio Garcia Dotto - 2019 - Cadernos Espinosanos 41:241-277.
    Este artigo compara e contrasta dois conceitos filosóficos provenientes de distintas linhagens de pensamento: de um lado, o _clinamen _de Lucrécio; do outro, o _conatus _de Espinosa. O que fomentou minha pesquisa foi uma conjugação dessas noções tal como proposto por Deleuze no apêndice de seu _Logique du sens_. Nesse sentido, a primeira seção está orientada tendo em vista uma elucidação da filosofia de Lucrécio — consequentemente, também a de Epicuro — e, especificamente, uma interpretação do desvio dos átomos ou (...)
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  38. Lucretius on the Divine: DRN 3.17-30, 5.1161-93, and 6.68-79.Chris Eckerman - 2019 - Mnemosyne 72:284-299.
    I provide a new interpretation of DRN 3.17-30 and 6.68-79, reading 3.17-30 in relation to Epicurus’ teachings on the mental construction of gods and 6.68-79 in relation to popular religion. I also review 5.1161-1193, discussing the evidence that the passage provides for the idealist and realist theses.
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  39. Lucretius' Arguments on the Swerve and Free-Action.Basil Evangelidis - 2019 - Landmarks in the Philosophy, Ethics and History of Science.
    In his version of atomism, Lucretius made explicit reference to the concept of an intrinsic declination of the atom, the atomic swerve (clinamen in Latin), stressing that the time and space of the infinitesimal atomic vibration is uncertain. The topic of this article is the Epicurean and Lucretian arguments in favour of the swerve. Our exposition of the Lucretian model of the atomic clinamen will present and elucidate the respective considerations on the alleged role of the swerve in the generation (...)
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  40. The Translation of Lucretius, Vol. 1 of The Works of Lucy Hutchinson Ed. By Reid Barbour and David Norbrook.Stephen Greenblatt - 2019 - Common Knowledge 25 (1-3):458-458.
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  41. Cosmos in the Ancient World.Phillip Sidney Horky (ed.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    How did the ancient Greeks and Romans conceptualise order? This book answers that question by analysing the formative concept of kosmos in ancient literature, philosophy, science, art, and religion. This concept encouraged the Greeks and Romans to develop theories to explain core aspects of human life, including nature, beauty, society, politics, the individual, and what lies beyond human experience. Hence, Greek kosmos, and its Latin correlate mundus, are subjects of profound reflection by a wide range of important ancient figures, including (...)
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  42. Lucretius and the Conscience of an Epicurean.David Konstan - 2019 - Politeia 1 (2):67-79.
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  43. Head-Fake: Two Jokes in Lucretius 3.136–50.Michael McOsker - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):903-904.
    Towards the beginning of Book 3, Lucretius starts his description of the soul. According to Epicurus, the soul is divided into two, an irrational part, which is coextensive with the body, and a rational part, the ‘mind’, which is located in the chest. This position is a relic from an earlier, non–philosophical tradition, and was adopted by several different philosophers. But Alexandrian doctors would soon correctly locate the mind in the head, and later Epicureans would have to defend an increasingly (...)
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  44. What Matters in the Mirror of Time: Why Lucretius’ Symmetry Argument Fails.Lukas J. Meier - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):651-660.
    abstractBy appealing to the similarity between pre-vital and post-mortem nonexistence, Lucretius famously tried to show that our anxiety about death was irrational. His so-called Symmetry Argument has been attacked in various ways, but all of these strategies are themselves problematic. In this paper, I propose a new approach to undermining the argument: when Parfit’s distinction between identity and what matters is applied, not diachronically but across possible worlds, the alleged symmetry can be broken. Although the pre-vital and posthumous time spans (...)
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  45. Embryology, Female Semina and Male Vincibility in Lucretius, de Rervm Natvra.Michael Pope - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):229-245.
    In a poem setting forth the way things are in nature, it is fitting for Lucretius to address, among many other phenomena, human conception and embryonic determination. With an eye toward ethics, Lucretius demonstrates how sexual reproduction at the seminal level can be explained by Epicurean atomism. In this paper, I am concerned with the biological ‘how’ of conception as explained in De Rerum Natura but also with the ethical ‘therefore’ for Lucretius’ readership and estimations of male autonomy. For modern (...)
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  46. Reformulación del rol político de la diosa Venus en el De rerum natura de Tito Lucrecio Caro.Mayra Salas - 2019 - Areté. Revista de Filosofía 31 (1):217-233.
    La invocación a la diosa Venus en el proemio al libro primero del De rerum natura es uno de los más memorables en la historia de la literatura, así como uno de los más inquietantes en la historia de los textos que niegan todo influjo divino en los asuntos humanos. El presente trabajo busca hallar en la presencia de la diosa Venus a lo largo de todo el poema una dimensión ordenadora que la distinguiría de cualquier entidad divina tradicional. Proponemos, (...)
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  47. Spinoza’s Law: The Epicurean Definition of the Law in the Theological Political Treatise.Dimitris Vardoulakis - 2019 - Radical Philosophy 5 (2):23-33.
    In the first few pages of chapter 4 of his Theological Political Treatise (1670), Spinoza defines his conception of the law. In fact, he defines the law twice, first in terms of compulsion or necessity and then in terms of use. I would like to investigate here these definitions, in particular the second one, as it is Spinoza’s preferred one. The difficulty with understanding this definition is that it contains an expression, ratio vivendi, that is repeated several times in the (...)
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  48. The End of Epicurean Infinity: Critical Reflections on the Epicurean Infinite Universe.Frederik Bakker - 2018 - In Frederik Bakker, Delphine Bellis & Carla Rita Palmerino (eds.), Space, Imagination and the Cosmos from Antiquity to the Early Modern Period. Cham, Zwitserland: pp. 41-67.
    In contrast to other ancient philosophers, Epicurus and his followers famously maintained the infinity of matter, and consequently of worlds. This was inferred from the infinity of space, because they believed that a limited amount of matter would inevitably be scattered through infinite space, and hence be unable to meet and form stable compounds. By contrast, the Stoics claimed that there was only a finite amount of matter in infinite space, which stayed together because of a general centripetal tendency. The (...)
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  49. Collisions, Design & The Swerve.Jamie Brassett & John O'Reilly - 2018 - In .
    If only everything were formed of neat laminar flows, with easy to understand conditions, and determinable outcomes: there would be no risk to manage out, messy inconsistencies and uncertainties to disrupt well-laid out plans. Things are not so clear-cut however. Indeed, as scientists, poets and philosophers of science have pointed out it is under conditions of nondeterminism and complexity that everything comes into being. There is an issue, then, when creative disciplines in particular find such complexity problematic enough to design (...)
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  50. An Evaluation of Epicurus and Lukretius' Perceptions of Death and Non-Existence.Mustafa Çakmak - 2018 - Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):357-376.
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