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Summary

Titus Lucretius Carus (c. 99 – 55 BC) was a Roman poet and philosopher. He is author of the Latin epic poem De rerum natura (On the Nature of Things), comprised of six books in hexameter verse that address topics in Epicurean philosophy, including the atomic theory, the nature of the gods, freewill and determinism, the nature of mind and soul, sensation and thought, cosmogony, how the physical world is ordered and regulated, and the development of human civilization. The poem is a key source for our knowledge of Epicureanism and it had a major impact on Western thought in the Enlightenment and early modern period.

Key works

The most accessible English translation of Lucretius’ De rerum natura, with facing Latin text, is the Loeb edition of W. H. D. Rouse (revised M . F. Smith) Lucrèce et al 1975. There is also a verse translation by R. Melville in the Oxford World’s Classics Series with a good introduction by D. P. Fowler Melville & Fowler 1999. The collected papers in Algra et al 1997, Gale 2007, and Gillespie & Hardie 2007 highlight a range of literary and philosophical approaches to Lucretius.

Introductions David Sedley offers the best introductory article on Lucretius Sedley 2013.  
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1142 found
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  1. Deleuze and Ancient Atomism.Yannis Chatzantonis - manuscript
    A brief survey of Deleuze’s writings on ancient atomism and on the concept of the atom in general. Deleuze’s treatment of atomism is significant because it makes clear Deleuze’s aim in shifting the mereological vocabulary from points to lines; it shows what, in Deleuze’s sense, it means to unground. In other words, it sets down the conditions for a successful Deleuzian critique of essentialist metaphysics of structure.
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  2. Science and Philosophy in Titus Lucvetius Carus.Emil DumitraŞcu - forthcoming - Annals of the University of Craiova, Series: Philosophy:89-96.
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  3. Michel Serres and the Rhythms of the Flow – Part 3.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter Rhuthmic Perception Theory At the juncture point between ontology and knowledge was the soul. According to Lucretius, the soul consisted of two parts: the animus, located in the chest, which commanded intellectual operations and will, and the anima which was spread throughout the body, received perceptions and transmitted in turn the impulses of the command center. The soul in both aspects could be shown to be corporeal. To make it short, anthropology could be - Physique – Nouvel article.
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  4. Michel Serres and the Rhythms of the Flow – Part 2.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter Rhuthmic ontology Having set up the larger scientific frame, Serres introduced Lucretius' ontology. He did not pay attention to the atoms themselves but it is worth noticing that Lucretius described them as endowed with various size, weight, and “shape” which was an accurate translation of the Democritean rhuthmós. Serres started from Book 2 where the concept of clinamen – declination was introduced as “depellere paulum, tantum quod - Physique – Nouvel article.
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  5. Lucretius and Monsters in Advance.Vittorio Morfino - forthcoming - Philosophy Today.
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  6. The Epicureanism of Lucretius.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - In Gretchen Reydams-Schils, Myrto Garani & David Konstan (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    What is distinctive about Lucretius’s version of Epicureanism? The answer might appear to be “nothing,” for two reasons. First, Epicureanism in general is doctrinally conservative, with followers of Epicurus claiming to follow his authority. Second, Lucretius claims to be merely transmitting the arguments of his beloved master Epicurus in a pleasing manner. I argue that these considerations do not prevent De Rerum Natura from presenting a distinct version of Epicureanism. Its arguments in physics are almost certainly drawn from Epicurus himself. (...)
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  7. Objections to Jeremy Simon’s Response to Lucretius’s Symmetry Argument in Advance.Abe Witonsky & Sarah Whitman - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophical Research.
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  8. Review of Lucretius and the Early Modern.Charles T. Wolfe - forthcoming - The Classical Review.
    long version of review forthcoming in much shorter version in Classical Review.
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  9. Epicureans on Death and Lucretius’ Squandering Argument.Scott Aikin - 2022 - Southwest Philosophy Review 38 (1):41-49.
    Lucretius follows his symmetry argument that one should not fear death with a dialectical strategy, the squandering argument. The dialectical presumption behind the squandering argument is that its audience is not an Epicurean, so squanders their life. The question is whether the squandering argument works on lives that by Epicurean standards are not squandered.
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  10. Lucretius Postmodernity Epicureanism and Atomism.Irfan Ajvazi - 2022 - Idea Books.
    Abstract: Lucretius made it plain that his poem was designed to liberate man from superstition, the fear of death and the tyranny of priests: \"When man’s life lay for all to see foully groveling upon the ground, crushed, which displayed her head from the regions of heaven, lowering over mortals with horrible aspect, a man of Greece was the first that dared to uplift mortal eyes against her. . . . but all the more they goaded the eager courage of (...)
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  11. ¿Qué es “Venus”? Una nueva investigación sobre De rerum natura I.1-49.Julián Barenstein - 2022 - Hybris, Revista de Filosofí­A 13 (1):121-150.
    In this research I propose to bring to light the meaning of "Venus" in the invocation of Lucretius´s De rerum natura. This paper is divided into six parts. In the first, I give an account of the various interpretations of the invocation and I systematize them. In the second I analyze and discuss three incategorizable investigations. In the third and fourth parts I expose the epicurean concepts of pleasure and divinity respectively. In the fifth I look for the terms, by (...)
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  12. Curing Virtue: Epicureanism and Erotic Fantasy in Machiavelli’s Mandragola.Michelle T. Clarke - 2022 - Political Theory 50 (6):913-938.
    Who is Lucrezia, the mysterious woman at the center of Machiavelli’s comic play Mandragola? And why is she deemed “fit to govern a kingdom”? This article revisits these questions with attention to Mandragola’s sophisticated, and often irreverent, allusions to Roman source materials. While scholars have long recognized that Mandragola draws on Roman history and drama, its sustained engagement with Lucretian and Ovidian poetry has gone largely unnoticed. In what follows, I trace these allusions and show how Machiavelli uses them to (...)
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  13. Ennius and Lucretius - (J.S.) Nethercut Ennius Noster: Lucretius and the Annales. Pp. X + 260. New York: Oxford University Press, 2021. Cased, £64, Us$99. Isbn: 978-0-19-751769-7. [REVIEW]Jay Fisher - 2022 - The Classical Review 72 (1):136-138.
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  14. Lucretius, the Atomists, and the Greek Etymology of Manare.Alex Hardie - 2022 - Hermes 150 (2):237.
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  15. The Erotics of Materialism: Lucretius and Early Modern Poetics by Jessie Hock.Philip Hardie - 2022 - American Journal of Philology 143 (1):181-185.
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  16. The reception of lucretius in italy - (f.) citti, (d.) pellacani (edd.) Ragione E furore. Lucrezio nell'italia contemporanea. Pp. cii + 248, b/w & colour pls. Bologna: Pendragon, 2020. Paper, €28. Isbn: 978-88-3364-203-1. [REVIEW]Valentina Prosperi - 2022 - The Classical Review 72 (1):138-141.
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  17. Lucretius’ Prolepsis.Chiara Rover - 2022 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 43 (2):279-314.
    This paper aims to investigate the equivalent of Epicurus’ πρόληψις, the second criterion of the Epicurean Canonic, in Lucretius’ De rerum natura. Taking stock of the several occurrences of the Latin terms notitia and notities in the six books of the poem, I show that Lucretius’ view about preconception remains faithful to Epicurus’ πρόληψις, and that the poet does not endorse a less empiricist position than his Master because of some influence of the Stoic ἔννοια. To this end, I will (...)
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  18. Marx, ciencia de la contingencia.Alejo Stark - 2022 - Res Pública. Revista de Historia de Las Ideas Políticas 25 (1):31-39.
    En su libro On the Nature of Marx’s Things Jacques Lezra hereda otro Marx, y otro materialismo. Un materialismo aleatorio, un materialismo de la contingencia dinámica de Marx y sus “cosas”. Tal “corriente subterránea” del materialismo aleatorio es excavada por Lezra en su desvío por las cartas, cuadernos y notas “privadas” de un joven Marx que trabajaba en su tesis de doctorado. Siguiendo el hilo necrofilológico de Lezra, que se topa con Lucrecio y sus “cosas,” encontramos que, paralelamente, Marx también (...)
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  19. Homerus sceptra potitus (Lucr. 3,1037–1038). De rerum natura als Hinführung zur Homerlektüre?Dorothea Weber - 2022 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 166 (1):22-44.
    De rerum natura displays a particular closeness to the Homeric epics on various levels: in language, in arguments, and in the selection of examples. This closeness clearly goes beyond similarities arising from the affinity as determined by genre. Further, a couple of passages are veritable translations from the Iliad resp. the Odyssey. There, the attitude towards the pretext becomes especially clear. It ranges from acknowledgement to rejection and in some instances is brought about through the use of allegory. This attitude (...)
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  20. Lucretian Symmetry and the Content-Based Approach.Huiyuhl Yi - 2022 - Philosophia 50 (2):815-831.
    In addressing the Lucretian symmetry problem, the content-based approach attends to the difference between the contents of the actual life and those of relevant possible lives of a person. According to this approach, the contents of a life with an earlier beginning would substantially differ from, and thus be discontinuous with, the contents of the actual life, whereas the contents of a life with the same beginning but a later death would be continuous with the contents of the actual life. (...)
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  21. ‘In the Light of Leibniz and Lucretius’: An Encounter Between Deleuze and New Materialism.Hanjo Berressem - 2021 - Deleuze and Guattari Studies 15 (4):497-522.
    While most new materialists, including Thomas Nail, tend to distance themselves from Deleuze, this essay reads the encounter of Nail's ‘process materialism’ and Deleuzian philosophy as productive rather than contentious. After tracing the affinities of their notions of continuity and discontinuity by way of Deleuze's The Fold: Leibniz and the Baroque and Nail's Lucretius I: An Ontology of Motion and Being and Motion, the essay considers Nail's unfolding of Lucretius’ luminous philosophy in relation to Deleuze's reading of Lucretius from within (...)
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  22. Qui capite ipse sua in statuit uestigia sese. Lucrezio e lo scetticismo nel libro IV del De rerum natura.Michele Corradi - 2021 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 42 (2):291-319.
    In his refutation of skepticism in book IV of De rerum natura, Lucretius uses argumentative methods typical of Epicurus: the περιτροπή is in many ways similar to that used by the philosopher in book XXV of Περὶ φύσεως, the same book where, in a passage dedicated to the criticism against determinists, can be found a reference to the criterion of the πρόληψις, that Lucretius exploits in his refutation. Moreover, Lucretius develops a strong demonstration concerning the irrefutability of αἴσθησις as a (...)
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  23. Prenatal and Posthumous Nonexistence: Lucretius on the Harmlessness of Death.Taylor Cyr - 2021 - In Erin Dolgoy, Kimberly Hurd Hale & Bruce Peabody (eds.), Political Theory on Death and Dying. Routledge. pp. 111-120..
    One of the most fascinating and continually debated arguments in the philosophical literature on the badness of death comes from the work of Lucretius (Titus Lucretius Carus, circa 99-55 BCE). This chapter will focus on Lucretius’s famous Symmetry Argument. I will begin by saying more about what exactly Epicureanism teaches about death — and why Epicureans thought it could not be bad. After that, I will provide the passage from Lucretius’s epic poem that includes his reasons for thinking that death (...)
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  24. Lucretius and Satire - (T.H.M.) Gellar-Goad Laughing Atoms, Laughing Matter. Lucretius’ de Rerum Natura and Satire. Pp. X + 280. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2020. Cased, Us$85. Isbn: 978-0-472-13180-8. [REVIEW]Jerome Kemp - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (1):95-97.
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  25. The Moral Philosophy of Lucretius and Aquinas: Competing Ends and Means.Jason Nehez - 2021 - Studia Gilsoniana 10 (2):293-319.
    The author first explains wisdom and its importance to moral philosophy. Secondly, he follows with a consideration of the nature of things and the soul as told by Lucretius. Then he presents a brief summary on St. Thomas understanding of soul and how his faculty psychology is a superior explanation of moral philosophy. The author concludes by showing how Lucretius’ ethical system fails and to attain true happiness we must take up a faculty psychology aimed at virtue and the perfection (...)
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  26. A Note on the Ascription of Ennius, Annales 5 Skutsch.Jason S. Nethercut - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):891-894.
    This note adduces corroborating evidence for Skutsch's ascription of Enn. Ann. 5 to a description of the water cycle in the speech of Homer in the proem to the Annales. Despite the flawed argumentation in Skutsch's presentation and despite a general reluctance among scholars to endorse his ascription, this note argues that his solution should remain part of the scholarly discussion, not least because there are aspects of Skutsch's argument that remain uncontested and because Lucretius seems to endorse this location (...)
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  27. The Reception of Lucretius - (P.R.) Hardie, (V.) Prosperi, (D.) Zucca (Edd.) Lucretius Poet and Philosopher. Background and Fortunes of de Rerum Natura. (Trends in Classics Supplementary Volume 90.) Pp. X + 403, B/W & Colour Ills. Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, 2020. Cased, £118, €129.95, Us$149.99. Isbn: 978-3-11-067347-0. [REVIEW]Alessio Panichi - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (1):97-100.
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  28. Lucretian Puzzles.Michael Rabenberg - 2021 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 8:110-140.
    It seems that people typically prefer dying later to dying earlier. It also seems that people typically do not prefer having been created earlier to having been created later. Lucretius’ Puzzle is the question whether anything typically rationally recommends having a preference for dying later to dying earlier over having a preference for having been created earlier to having been created later. In this paper, I distinguish among three ways in which Lucretius’ Puzzle can be understood and say how I (...)
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  29. Επιβολη Τησ Διανοιασ: Reflections on the Fourth Epicurean Criterion of Truth.Jan Maximilian Robitzsch - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):601-616.
    This paper discusses ἐπιβολαὶ τῆς διανοίας, which later Epicureans are supposed to have elevated to a fourth criterion of truth to complement perceptions, preconceptions and feelings. By examining Epicurus’ extant writings, the paper distinguishes three different senses of the term: ‘thought in general’, ‘act of attention’ and ‘mental perception’. It is argued that only the sense ‘mental perception’ yields a plausible reading of ἐπιβολαί as a criterion of truth. The paper then turns to the textual evidence on ἐπιβολαί in later (...)
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  30. The Pocket Epicurean.John Sellars - 2021 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    A short, smart guide to living the good life through the teachings of Epicurus. As long as there has been human life, we’ve searched for what it means to be happy. More than two thousand years ago, the Greek philosopher Epicurus came to his own conclusion: all we really want in life is pleasure. Though today we tend to associate the word “Epicurean” with indulgence in the form of food and wine, the philosophy of Epicurus was about a life well (...)
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  31. Retire with Thanks: Rethinking Lucretius 3.962.Tetsufumi Takeshita - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):895-897.
    This article aims at proposing a solution to one of the well-known textual cruces in Lucretius’ De rerum natura. After a brief survey of the suggested emendations, the author will shed some fresh light on Manning's gratus, which recent editors have curiously neglected. The idea that the old man should retire from life with thanks is not uncommon among classical writers. In addition, parallel expressions are also found in Epicurus’ own words. This article concludes that gratus is what we would (...)
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  32. The Epicurean Notion of Epibolê.Voula Tsouna - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (2):179-201.
    The surviving writings of Epicurus and his followers contain several references to epibolê – a puzzling notion that does not receive discussion in the extant Epicurean texts. There is no consensus about what epibolê is, what it is of, and what it operates on and, moreover, its epistemological status is controversial. This article aims to address these issues in both Epicurus and later Epicurean authors. Part One focuses mainly on Epicurus’ Letter to Herodotus, highlights a crucial distinction hitherto unnoticed in (...)
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  33. After Lucretius.John Wilkinson - 2021 - Critical Inquiry 47 (S2):S89-S89.
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  34. Epicurus in Rome: Philosophical Perspectives in the Ciceronian Age.Sergio Yona & Gregson Davis (eds.) - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    The role of Greek thought in the final days of the Roman republic is a topic that has garnered much attention in recent years. This volume of essays, commissioned specially from a distinguished international group of scholars, explores the role and influence of Greek philosophy, specifically Epicureanism, in the late republic. It focuses primarily on the works and views of Cicero, premier politician and Roman philosopher of the day, and Lucretius, foremost among the representatives and supporters of Epicureanism at the (...)
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  35. Epicurus in the Roman Republic: Philosophical Perspectives in the Age of Cicero.Sergio Yona & Gregson Davis (eds.) - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    The role of Greek thought in the final days of the Roman republic is a topic that has garnered much attention in recent years. This volume of essays, commissioned specially from a distinguished international group of scholars, explores the role and influence of Greek philosophy, specifically Epicureanism, in the late republic. It focuses primarily (although not exclusively) on the works and views of Cicero, premier politician and Roman philosopher of the day, and Lucretius, foremost among the representatives and supporters of (...)
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  36. Alcune osservazioni su naturae species ratioque nel De rerum natura di Lucrezio.Luca Beltramini - 2020 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 164 (2):308-331.
    The article proposes to re-examine the Lucretian formula naturae species ratioque, the meaning of which has prompted some critical debate. The examination begins from an analysis of rhetoric and argument in the sections in which the phrase occurs, with the goal of demonstrating that the meaning ‘rational vision of nature’ is more apt to the context and to Lucretius’ poetic and philosophical programme, which often relies on metaphors drawn from the semantic field of vision to describe the comprehension of natural (...)
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  37. A New Supplement to Diogenes of Oenoanda’s Fr. 6 Smith: A Case of Epicurean Language Selection.Alberto Corrado - 2020 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 164 (2):269-276.
    This paper intends to offer a new supplement to a corrupt passage of the Epicurean inscription of Oenoanda. Smith, in the lacuna of Fr. 6, uses the phrasal term πρῶτα σώματα to indicate the atoms. The supplement is not satisfying as it is based solely on evidence drawn from non-Epicurean texts and Lucretius, who writes in Latin and is not always reliable for reconstructing the Epicurean terminology. In this article, I will try to demonstrate that πρῶτα σώματα is in fact (...)
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  38. Mixed Bodies, Agency and Narrative in Lucretius and Machiavelli.Sean Erwin - 2020 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):337-355.
    Scholars have cited the influence of Lucretius on Machiavelli as important to framing Machiavelli’s position on the freedom of political agents. Some scholars like Roecklin and Rahe argue that Machiavelli was a determinist based on Machiavelli’s rejection of the clinamen; others argue with Brown and Morfino that Machiavelli’s affirmation of Lucretian natural principles left room for the freedom of agents. However, this paper takes a different approach by arguing that Machiavelli successfully resists identification with either of these positions. I argue (...)
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  39. Letters and Writing in Ancient Rome - (S.A.) Frampton Empire of Letters. Writing in Roman Literature and Thought From Lucretius to Ovid. Pp. XIV + 206, Ills. New York: Oxford University Press, 2019. Cased, £47.99, Us$74. Isbn: 978-0-19-091540-7. [REVIEW]T. E. Franklinos - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):392-394.
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  40. Crafting Chaos: Intelligent Design in Ovid, Metamorphoses Book 1 and Plato's Timaeus.Peter Kelly - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (2):734-748.
    Many attempts have been made to define the precise philosophical outlook of Ovid's account of cosmogony from the beginning of the Metamorphoses, while numerous different and interconnected influences have been identified including Homer, Hesiod, Empedocles, Apollonius Rhodius, Lucretius and Virgil. This has led some scholars to conclude that Ovid's cosmogony is simply eclectic, a magpie collection of various poetic and philosophical snippets haphazardly jumbled together, and with no significant philosophical dimension whatsoever. A more constructive approach could see Ovid's synthesis of (...)
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  41. Health and Hedonism in Plato and Epicurus by Kelly Arenson.David Konstan - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):401-402.
    Epicurus had a distinctive position on pleasure: the greatest possible pleasure consists in the absence of pain. The pain in question may be physical or psychological. Not to be hungry, cold, or otherwise distressed is the greatest pleasure that the body can know; to be free of fear, particularly the kind of vague, undirected anxiety that Lucretius called cura, is the most pleasant state that the mind can achieve. As Lucretius exclaims, "Do you not see that our nature cries out (...)
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  42. Our Atoms, Ourselves: Lucretius on the Psychology of Personal Identity.Maeve Lentricchia - 2020 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 41 (2):297-328.
    In Epicurean cosmology, material reconstitution, or palingenesis is the necessary consequence of the infinity of time and the eternity of atoms. I examine Lucretius’ treatment of this phenomenon and consider the extent to which his view enables us to develop an Epicurean response to the question: what makes a person at two different times one and the same person? I offer a reading of this passage in the light of modern accounts of persistence and identity, and what Lucretius states in (...)
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  43. Penser les Fondements de l'Éthique Sociale Dans les Deux Derniers Siècles de la République Romaine.Carlos Lévy - 2020 - Philosophical Readings 12.
    The purpose of this article is to analyze how the reflection on the origins of the civilization was developed in Rome, at the end of the Republic, in a city where during centuries, nobody tried to go beyond this point of absolute origin that was the foundation of the Vrbs. In order to explore not only Cicéro’s philosophic reflection, but also his rhetorical texts, especially the De inuentione, which contains at the beginning of its first book a very interesting explanatory (...)
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  44. The Oxford Handbook to Epicurus and Epicureanism.Phillip Mitsis (ed.) - 2020 - Oxford England: Oxford University Press.
    This volume offers authoritative discussions of all aspects of Epicurus's philosophy and then traces out some of its most important subsequent influences throughout the Western intellectual tradition. Such a detailed and comprehensive study of Epicureanism is especially timely given the tremendous current revival of interest in Epicurus and his rivals, the Stoics. The thirty-one contributions in this volume offer an unmatched resource for all those wishing to deepen their knowledge of Epicurus' powerful arguments about happiness, death, and the nature of (...)
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  45. Lucretius and the Philosophical Use of Literary Persuasion.Tim O'Keefe - 2020 - In Donncha O'Rourke (ed.), Approaches to Lucretius: traditions and innovations in reading De Rerum Natura. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 177-194.
    The first part of this paper looks into the question of Lucretius’ philosophical sources and whether he draws almost exclusively from Epicurus himself or also from later Epicurean texts. I argue that such debates are inconclusive and likely will remain so, even if additional Epicurean texts are discovered, and that even if we were able to ascertain Lucretius’ philosophical sources, doing so would add little to our understanding of the De Rerum Natura. The second part of the paper turns to (...)
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  46. Approaches to Lucretius: Traditions and Innovations in Reading the de Rerum Natura.Donncha O'Rourke (ed.) - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    Both in antiquity and ever since the Renaissance Lucretius' De Rerum Natura has been admired – and condemned – for its startling poetry, its evangelical faith in materialist causation, and its seductive advocacy of the Epicurean good life. Approaches to Lucretius assembles an international team of classicists and philosophers to take stock of a range of critical approaches to which this influential poem has given rise and which in turn have shaped its interpretation, including textual criticism, the text's strategies for (...)
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  47. Review of George Santayana, Three Philosophical Poets – Lucretius, Dante, and Goethe. [REVIEW]Daniel Pinkas - 2020 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 12 (2).
    Three Philosophical Poets is published as volume VIII of the Critical Edition of The Works of George Santayana, with the same impeccable editorial apparatus as the preceding volumes and an excellent introduction by James Seaton. This introduction is geared to shedding light on the broader philosophical context of a book that Seaton rightly considers “as perhaps the best introduction to Santayana’s work”. Indeed, it is a relatively short book that touches upon some of Santaya...
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  48. Epicurean Philosophy and Its Parts.Clerk Shaw - 2020 - In Kelly Arenson (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy. pp. 13-24.
    This chapter offers an overview of the Epicurean conception of philosophy, with special attention to the value of physics. The Epicureans value physics not only for its ability to help remove superstitious beliefs about the gods and death, but also for its ability to stabilize our beliefs and to give causal accounts of ethically-relevant kinds such as pleasure and desire.
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  49. Lucretius and the Language of Nature.Barnaby Taylor - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    Lucretius' Epicurean poem De Rerum Natura made a fundamental and lasting contribution to the language of Latin philosophy. In this book Barnaby Taylor offers an in-depth reconstruction of core features of Epicurean linguistic theory, and a new understanding of Lucretius' linguistic innovation and creativity.
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  50. Memmius, Cicero and Lucretius: A Note on Cic. Fam. 13.1.Christopher V. Trinacty - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (1):440-443.
    A recent piece in this journal by Morgan and Taylor made the case that C. Memmius is not to be seen as an active prosecutor of Epicureanism but rather as an Epicurean himself, who merely has disagreed with the grimly orthodox Epicurean sect in Athens. As such, Memmius’ building intentions for Epicurus’ home could have been to create an honorary monument or possibly even construct a grander locus for pilgrimage and the practice of Epicureanism. This note adds to their findings (...)
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