16 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Joanne Waugh [12]Joanne B. Waugh [7]Joanne Beil Waugh [1]
  1.  21
    Who Speaks for Plato?: Studies in Platonic Anonymity.Hayden W. Ausland, Eugenio Benitez, Ruby Blondell, Lloyd P. Gerson, Francisco J. Gonzalez, J. J. Mulhern, Debra Nails, Erik Ostenfeld, Gerald A. Press, Gary Alan Scott, P. Christopher Smith, Harold Tarrant, Holger Thesleff, Joanne Waugh, William A. Welton & Elinor J. M. West - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this international and interdisciplinary collection of critical essays, distinguished contributors examine a crucial premise of traditional readings of Plato's dialogues: that Plato's own doctrines and arguments can be read off the statements made in the dialogues by Socrates and other leading characters. The authors argue in general and with reference to specific dialogues, that no character should be taken to be Plato's mouthpiece. This is essential reading for students and scholars of Plato.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  2.  18
    Heraclitus.Joanne B. Waugh - 1991 - The Monist 74 (4):605-623.
    Nietzsche exempts Heraclitus from the charge levelled at other philosophes that in denigrating the senses and the body, and in dehistoricizing concepts, they kill them and stuff them, turning them into mummies. Nietzsche’s admiration of Heraclitus is not surprising in light of the resemblances between the two writers, not the least of which is that they inspire so many divergent, and contradictory, readings. As it becomes increasingly clear—thanks to Nietzsche and to those whom he inspired—that much more is contingent than (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  71
    Heraclitus.Joanne B. Waugh - 1991 - The Monist 74 (4):605-623.
    Nietzsche exempts Heraclitus from the charge levelled at other philosophes that in denigrating the senses and the body, and in dehistoricizing concepts, they kill them and stuff them, turning them into mummies. Nietzsche’s admiration of Heraclitus is not surprising in light of the resemblances between the two writers, not the least of which is that they inspire so many divergent, and contradictory, readings. As it becomes increasingly clear—thanks to Nietzsche and to those whom he inspired—that much more is contingent than (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  19
    Analytic Aesthetics and Feminist Aesthetics: Neither/Nor?Joanne B. Waugh - 1995 - In Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 399-415.
    Analytic and feminist philosophers already uncomfortable with the practice of devoting special sessions at meetings and special issues of journals to "feminist aesthetics" may find that this piece adds to their uneasiness. If "feminist aesthetics" is treated as a special topic within aesthetics, then should we infer that the rest of the time we do masculine aesthetics? some feminists would argue for an affirmative answer to this question; the title acknowledges them in insinuating that if analytic aesthetics is not feminist (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  28
    Philosophical Feminism and Popular Culture.Sharon L. Crasnow & Joanne Waugh (eds.) - 2012 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    The eight essays contained in Philosophical Feminism and Popular Culture explore the portrayal of women and various philosophical responses to that portrayal in contemporary post-civil rights society. The essays examine visual, print, and performance media — stand-up comedy, movies, television, and a blockbuster trilogy of novel. These philosophical feminist analyses of popular culture consider the possibilities, both positive and negative, that popular culture presents for articulating the structure of the social and cultural practices in which gender matters, and for changing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  44
    Feminists Doing Ethics.Peggy Desautels, Joanne Waugh, Margaret Urban Walker, Uma Narayan, Diana Tietjens Meyers & Hilde Lindemann Nelson (eds.) - 2001 - Feminist Constructions.
    As the initial book in the Feminist Constructions series, Feminists Doing Ethics broaches the ideas of critiquing social practice and developing an ethics of universal justness. The essays collected within explore the intricacies and impact of reasoned moral action, the virtues of character, and the empowering responsibility that comes with morality. These and other essays were taken from Feminist Ethics Revisited: An International Conference on Feminist Ethics held in October of 1999. Waugh and DesAutels bring to light in these pages (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  17
    The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues (review).Joanne Waugh - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (4):553-554.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Philosophy 41.4 (2003) 553-554 [Access article in PDF] Ruby Blondell. The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Pp. xi + 452. Cloth, $75.00. Plato's dialogues were written before audiences distinguished philosophy from literature. Recently scholars have argued that the dialogues should be read as philosophy that is literature, and no one makes the case better than Blondell does (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  29
    Writing the history of historied thought.Joanne B. Waugh - 2005 - Metaphilosophy 36 (5):578-612.
    In Historied Thought, Constructed World, Joseph Margolis identifies the philosophical themes that will dominate philosophical discussions in the twenty-first century, given the recognition of the historicity of philosophical thought in the twentieth century. In what follows I examine these themes, especially cognitive intransparency, and the arguments presented in favor of them, noting the extent to which they rest on a view of language that takes a written text, and not speech, as the paradigm of language. I suggest if one takes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  49
    Analytic aesthetics and feminist aesthetics: Neither/nor?Joanne B. Waugh - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (4):317-326.
  10. foucault, Feminism, And The Care Of The Self: Lessons From Antiquity.Joanne Waugh - 2004 - Florida Philosophical Review 4 (1):49-60.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  18
    Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy.Joanne Waugh - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):615-616.
    Book Reviews Andrea Wilson Nightingale, Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995. Pp. xiv + ~a~. Cloth, $49.95. This is an important and timely book. Nightingale argues that notwithstanding Socra- tes' remarks about dialectic as the philosophical mode of discourse, Plato uses tradi- tional genres in constructing philosophy. Key to her argument are two notions. The first is that prior to Plato, 'philosophy' referred to intellectual cultivation in the broad sense and consequendy, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  19
    Preface.Joanne Waugh - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (1).
  13. Philosophy and the philosophy of science.Joanne Waugh & Roger Ariew - 2005 - In Martin Curd & Stathis Psillos (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Science. New York: Routledge. pp. 15.
  14. Poetry, Philosophy and Truth: Seeking Aletheia in Plato.Joanne B. Waugh - 2001 - In Konstantine Boudouris (ed.), Greek Philosophy and Epistemology. International Association for Greek Philosophy. pp. 188--203.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Questioning the Self: A Reaction to Carvalho, Press, and Schmid.Joanne B. Waugh - 2002 - In Gary Alan Scott (ed.), Does Socrates Have a Method?: Rethinking the Elenchus in Plato's Dialogues and Beyond. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 281-297.
  16.  7
    16 Questioning the Self: A Reaction to Carvalho, Press, and Schmid.Joanne Waugh - 2002 - In Scott Gary Alan (ed.), Does Socrates Have a Method?: Rethinking the Elenchus in Plato's Dialogues and Beyond. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 281-298.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark