Results for 'Environmental hermeneutics'

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  1.  58
    Critical Environmental Hermeneutics.John van Buren - 1995 - Environmental Ethics 17 (3):259-275.
    Local, national, and international conflicts over the use of forests between logging companies, governments, environmentalists, native peoples, local residents, recreationalists, and others—e.g., the controversy over the spotted owl in the old-growth forests of the Northwestern United States and over the rain forests in South America—have shown the need for philosophical reflection to help clarify the basic issues involved. Joining other philosophers who are addressing this problem, my own response takes the form of a sketch of the rough outlines of a (...)
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  2.  1
    From Ricœurian Hermeneutics to Environmental Hermeneutics. Space, Landscape, and Interpretation.Martinho Tomé Soares - 2021 - Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 12 (2):85-101.
    The analysis of fundamental texts such as “Architecture and Narrativity” and Memory, History, Forgetting aims to fill a gap in studies of Environmental Hermeneutics. Indeed, the analogy between space and narrative, through parallelism with the process of triple mimesis, is usually deduced by environmental hermeneuticists from the works Time and Narrative and Oneself as Another. However, Ricœur himself took it upon himself to make this transposition in a direct and elaborated way from a phenomenological and hermeneutic analysis (...)
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  3.  73
    Review of Interpreting Nature: The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics[REVIEW]Chandler D. Rogers - 2017 - Trumpeter: Journal of Ecosophy 32 (2):206-209.
  4.  45
    Review of Forrest Clingerman, Brian Treanor, Martin Drenthen and David Utsler , Interpreting Nature: The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics[REVIEW]Brian Onishi - 2015 - Environmental Values 24 (5):695-697.
  5. New Nature Narratives. Landscape Hermeneutics and Environmental Ethics.M. Drenthen - 2013 - In Forrest Clingerman, Martin Drenthen, Brian Treanor & David Utsler (eds.), Interpreting Nature. The Emerging Field of Environmental Hermeneutics. Fordham University Press. pp. 225-241.
    In this paper, I seek to provide building blocks for a reconciliation of the ethical care for heritage protection and nature restoration ethics. It will do so, by introducing a hermeneutic landscape philosophy that takes landscape as a multi-layered “text” in need of interpretation, and place identities as build upon certain readings of the landscape. I will argue that from a hermeneutic perspective, both approaches appear to complement each other. Renaturing presents a valuable correction to the anthropocentrism of many European (...)
     
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  6.  20
    Hermeneutics and the Culture of Birds: The Environmental Allegory of 'Easter Island'.Mick Smith - 2005 - Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (1):21 – 38.
    It has become commonplace to interpret 'Easter Island' in terms of an environmental allegory, a Malthusian morality tale of the consequences of over-exploitation of limited natural resources. There are, however, ethical dangers in treating places and peoples allegorically, as moralized means (lessons) to satisfy others' edificatory ends. Allegory reductively appropriates the past, presenting a specific interpretation as 'given' (fixed) and exemplary, wrongly suggesting that meanings and morals, like islands, are there to be 'discovered' ready-formed. Gadamer's hermeneutics suggests an (...)
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  7.  48
    Affected by Nature: A Hermeneutical Transformation of Environmental Ethics.Francis Noortgaete & Johan Tavernier - 2014 - Zygon 49 (3):572-592.
    The value-action gap poses a considerable challenge to normative environmental ethics. Because of the wide array of empirical research results that have become available in the fields of environmental psychology, education, and anthropology, ethicists are at present able to take into account insights on what effectively motivates proenvironmental behavior. The emotional aspect apparently forms a key element within a transformational process that leads to an internalization of nature within one's identity structure. We compare these findings with studies on (...)
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  8.  13
    Affected by Nature: A Hermeneutical Transformation of Environmental Ethics.Francis Van den Noortgaete & Johan De Tavernier - 2014 - Zygon 49 (3):572-592.
  9. Heritage and Hermeneutics: Towards a Broader Interpretation of Interpretation.Phillip Ablett & Pamela Dyer - 2009 - Current Issues in Tourism 12 (3):209-233.
    This article re-examines the theoretical basis for environmental and heritage interpretation in tourist settings in the light of hermeneutic philosophy. It notes that the pioneering vision of heritage interpretation formulated by Freeman Tilden envisaged a broadly educational, ethically informed and transformative art. By contrast, current cognitive psychological attempts to reduce interpretation to the monological transmission of information, targeting universal but individuated cognitive structures, are found to be wanting. Despite growing signs of diversity, this information processing approach to interpretation remains (...)
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  10.  37
    Paul Ricoeur’s Hermeneutics as a Model for Environmental Philosophy.David Utsler - 2009 - Philosophy Today 53 (2):174-179.
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  11.  47
    Appeals to the Bible in Ecotheology and Environmental Ethics: A Typology of Hermeneutical Stances.David G. Horrell, Cherryl Hunt & Christopher Southgate - 2008 - Studies in Christian Ethics 21 (2):219-238.
    This article surveys and classifies the kinds of appeal to the Bible made in recent theological discussions of ecology and environmental ethics. These are, first, readings of `recovery', followed by two types of readings of `resistance'. The first of these modes of resistance entails the exercise of suspicion against the text, a willingness to resist it given a commitment to a particular (ethical) reading perspective. The second, by contrast, entails a resistance to the contemporary ethical agenda, given a perceived (...)
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  12.  9
    Hermeneutics of Human-Animal Relations in the Wake of Rewilding: The Ethical Guide to Ecological Discomforts.Mateusz Tokarski - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    In consequence of significant social, political, economic, and demographic changes several wildlife species are currently growing in numbers and recolonizing Europe. While this is rightly hailed as a success of the environmental movement, the return of wildlife brings its own issues. As the animals arrive in the places we inhabit, we are learning anew that life with wild nature is not easy, especially when the accumulated cultural knowledge and experience pertaining to such coexistence have been all but lost. This (...)
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  13. A 'Hermeneutic Objection': Language and the Inner View.Gregory M. Nixon - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (2-3):257-269.
    In the worlds of philosophy, linguistics, and communications theory, a view has developed which understands conscious experience as experience which is 'reflected' back upon itself through language. This indicates that the consciousness we experience is possible only because we have culturally invented language and subsequently evolved to accommodate it. This accords with the conclusions of Daniel Dennett (1991), but the 'hermeneutic objection' would go further and deny that the objective sciences themselves have escaped the hermeneutic circle. -/- The consciousness we (...)
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  14. 'Reading Ourselves Through the Land: Landscape Hermeneutics and Ethics of Place'.Martin Drenthen - 2011 - In Forrest Clingerman Clingerman & Mark Dixon (eds.), 'Reading Ourselves Through the Land: Landscape Hermeneutics and Ethics of Place', In: F. Clingerman & M. Dixon : Placing Nature on the Borders of Religion, Philosophy, and Ethics. Ashgate.
    In this text, I discuss the environmental education project "Legible Landscape ", which aims to teach inhabitants to read their landscape and develop a closer, more engaged relationship to place. I show that the project's semiotic perspective on landscape legibility tends to hamper the understanding of the moral dimension of reading landscapes, and argue that a hermeneutical perspective is better suited to acknowledge the way that readers and texts are intimately connected.
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  15.  8
    Hermeneutics at the Time of the Anthropocene: The Case of Hans-Georg Gadamer.Patryk Szaj - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (2):235-254.
    The article puts forward the thesis that Hans-Georg Gadamer's hermeneutics can be useful for conceptualising the issue of the Anthropocene. Both speculative features of hermeneutics generally and specific Gadamerian insights are helpful for this matter. As for the speculative features of hermeneutics, the concept of understanding may be used, as well as Gadamer's analysis of prejudices and of the history of effect. Further, Gadamer's ecological insights anticipated some problems raised by the philosophy of the Anthropocene and are (...)
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  16.  15
    Growing Environmental Activists: Developing Environmental Agency and Engagement Through Children’s Fiction.Stephen Bigger & Jean Webb - unknown
    We explore how story has the potential to encourage environmental engagement and a sense of agency provided that critical discussion takes place. We illuminate this with reference to the philosophies of John Macmurray on personal agency and social relations; of John Dewey on the primacy of experience for philosophy; and of Paul Ricoeur on hermeneutics, dialogue, dialectics and narrative. We view the use of fiction for environmental understanding as hermeneutic, a form of conceptualising place which interprets experience (...)
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  17.  93
    Using and Abusing Nietzsche for Environmental Ethics.Ralph R. Acampora - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):187-194.
    Max Hallman has put forward an interpretation of Nietzsche’s philosophy according to which Nietzsche is a prototypical deep ecologist. In reply, I dispute Hallman’s main interpretive claim as well as its ethical and exegetical corollaries. I hold that Nietzsche is not a “biospheric egalitarian,” but rather an aristocratically individualistic “high humanist.” A consistently naturalistic transcendentalist, Nietzsche does submit a critique of modernity’s Christian-inflected anthropocentrism, and yet—in his later work—he endorses exploitation in the quest for nobility. I conclude thatecophilosophers need to (...)
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  18.  20
    Eco-Deconstruction. Derrida and Environmental Philosophy.Matthias Fritsch & David Wood Matthias Fritsch, Philippe Lynes - 2018 - New York, NY, USA: Fordham University Press.
    Eco-Deconstruction marks a new approach to the degradation of the natural environment, including habitat loss, species extinction, and climate change. While the work of French philosopher Jacques Derrida (1930–2004), with its relentless interrogation of the anthropocentric metaphysics of presence, has already proven highly influential in posthumanism and animal studies, the present volume, drawing on published and unpublished work by Derrida and others, builds on these insights to address the most pressing environmental issues of our time. -/- The volume brings (...)
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  19.  28
    Interpreting Environments: Tradition, Deconstruction, Hermeneutics.Robert Mugerauer - 1995 - University of Texas Press.
    Mugerauer seeks to make deconstruction and hermeneutics accessible to people in the environmental disciplines, including architecture, planning, urban studies, environmental studies, and cultural geography. Mugerauer demonstrates each methodology through a case study. The first study uses the traditional approach to recover the meaning of Jung's and Wittgenstein's houses by analyzing their historical, intentional contexts. The second case study utilizes deconstruction to explore Egyptian, French neoclassical, and postmodern attempts to use pyramids to constitute a sense of lasting presence. (...)
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  20.  7
    Environmental Antinomianism The Moral World Turned Upside Down?M. Smith - 2000 - Ethics and the Environment 5 (1):125-139.
    In rejecting the ethical authority of those social institutions that attempt to define and impose norms of belief and behavior, radical environmentalism has many parallels with past antinomian protests. It is characterized by a 'hermeneutics of suspicion' directed towards the establishment in all its forms and extending to all its attempts to 'lay down the law.' Those nomothetic models which represent environmentalists as, (a) seeking to extend current legal/bureaucratic frameworks to 'nature,' or (b) drawing moral conclusions from 'natural laws' (...)
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  21. Theology, Metaphysics, and Science: Twenty-First Century Hermeneutical Allies, Strangers, or Enemies?Peter M. Antoci - 2019 - Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 1 (3):226-239.
    This article answers the question of whether the study of theology and metaphysics can be classified currently, or ever qualify in the future, as a scientific endeavor. Rather than choose a particular theology or metaphysics as the subject of inquiry, this essay argues that it is not only necessary to recognize the role of hermeneutics within different fields of study, but that it is also necessary to begin a human hermeneutic with human experience. Changes in our global context, whether (...)
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  22.  81
    Public Visions of the Human/Nature Relationship and Their Implications for Environmental Ethics.Mirjam de Groot, Martin Drenthen & Wouter T. de Groot - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (1):25-44.
    A social scientific survey on visions of human/nature relationships in western Europe shows that the public clearly distinguishes not only between anthropocentrism and ecocentrism, but also between two nonanthropocentric types of thought, which may be called “partnership with nature” and “participation in nature.” In addition, the respondents distinguish a form of human/nature relationship that is allied to traditional stewardship but has a more ecocentric content, labeled here as “guardianship of nature.” Further analysis shows that the general public does not subscribe (...)
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  23.  8
    How Can Science Help Us Care for Nature? Hermeneutics, Fragility, and Responsibility for the Earth.Clarence W. Joldersma - 2009 - Educational Theory 59 (4):465-483.
    In this review essay, Clarence Joldersma argues for a novel role for science in developing an affirmative answer to his title question, “How can science help us care for nature?” He does so in dialogue with Clare Palmer's edited volume, Teaching Environmental Ethics, Dirk Postma's Why Care for Nature? and Michael Bonnett's Retrieving Nature. Joldersma suggests that although each book can help address the issue of how to teach students to care for nature, he parts company with their stance (...)
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  24.  20
    Emplotting Virtue: A Narrative Approach to Environmental Virtue Ethics.Brian Treanor - 2014 - State University of New York Press.
    _A rich hermeneutic account of the way virtue is understood and developed._.
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  25.  36
    Gadamer and the Otherness of Nature: Elements for an Environmental Education.Mauro GrÜn - 2005 - Human Studies 28 (2):157-171.
    In this work I search for elements that contribute to the development of the ethical dimension of environmental education. I start with the existence of what C.A. Bowers calls “areas of silence” in the curriculum in both schools and universities. The reason for this silence, I argue, is to be found in the Cartesian conceptual structures of curricula. I suggest that the works of Bacon, Galileo and Descartes provoke a twofold process that I have termed the forgetting of tradition (...)
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  26.  10
    Legere-Ligare. A Hermeneutical Key to the Environmentalist Experience of Nature.Francis Van den Noortgaete - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  27.  13
    Animal Welfare, the Earth, and Embodiment: Transforming the Task of Hermeneutic Phenomenology.Frank Schlalow - 2017 - Studia Phaenomenologica 17:83-100.
    The attempt to appropriate Heidegger’s thinking in order to found environmental ethics continues to pose challenges both for understanding the premise of an ethic, and, conversely, for unfolding the importance of his thought in the effort to displace the anthropocentric focus of modern philosophy. These challenges must be taken up on a methodological as well as a thematic level, in order to show how a claim of being can implicate a reciprocal guidance pertaining to our treatment of the earth, (...)
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  28.  1
    Strongly Participatory Science and Knowledge Justice in an Environmentally Contested Region.Barbara L. Allen - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (6):947-971.
    This article draws insights from a case study examining unanswered health questions of residents in two polluted towns in an industrial region in southern France. A participatory health study, as conducted by the author, is presented as a way to address undone science by providing the residents with relevant data supporting their illness claims. Local residents were included in the health survey process, from the formulation of the questions to the final data analysis. Through this strongly participatory science process, the (...)
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  29.  2
    General Theory of Modal Fields and Modal Explanations in Human and Environmental Sciences.Kari Väyrynen - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 26:89-94.
    The idea of ‘modal fields’ is inspired by regional and pluralistic ontologies, which were sketched and developed by Hegel, Husserl and especially Nicolai Hartmann. It suggests that the world is structured by spheres which are not reducible to each other, and that modal fields denote the scope of real possibilities inside the spheres. It is, for example, possible to distinguish between physical, biological, ecological, economic and technological possibilities/modal fields. It is also possible to define, for the purpose of scientific research, (...)
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  30.  10
    From Artwork to Place: Finding the Voices of Moreelse, Bacon, and Beuys at the Hermeneutical Intersection of Culture and Nature.Forrest Clingerman - 2011 - Environmental Philosophy 8 (1):1-24.
    This essay investigates the correlation between theological investigations of culture and those of the natural world. A fruitful question emerges when reflecting on how theological thinking resides between these subjects: how does our theological reflection on art meaningfully inform our consideration of nature? The path to exploring this question takes the form of questioning three different works of art: Willem Moreelse’s A Portrait of a Scholar, Francis Bacon’s Landscape,and Joseph Beuys’ Lightning with Stag in Its Glare. Exploring the interconnection between (...)
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  31.  17
    Ontologies of Nature: Continental Perspectives and Environmental Reorientations.Marjolein Oele & Gerard Kuperus (eds.) - 2017 - Springer Verlag.
    This volume contains essays that offer both historical and contemporary views of nature, as seen through a hermeneutic, deconstructive, and phenomenological lens. It reaches back to Ancient Greek conceptions of physis in Homer and Empedocles, encompasses 13th century Zen master Dōgen, and extends to include 21st Century Continental Thought. By providing ontologies of nature from the perspective of the history of philosophy and of contemporary philosophy alike, the book shows that such perspectives need to be seen in dialogue with each (...)
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  32.  66
    Eros After Nature.Chandler D. Rogers - 2016 - Soundings: An Interdisciplinary Journal 99 (3):223-245.
    On ground shared by environmental hermeneutics, critical social theory, and environmentally minded feminism, this article attempts to conciliate between the nearly antithetical ethical viewpoints of environmental philosophers David Abram and Steven Vogel. It will demonstrate first that Abram’s linguistic arguments for extending ethical considerability to nonhuman nature succumb to two of Vogel’s debilitating critiques, which it labels the social constructivist critique and the discourse ethics critique, and secondly that Abram fails to guard against the problem of human-human (...)
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  33. Interpreting Nature.Forrest Clingerman, Brian Treanor, Martin Drenthen & David Utsler (eds.) - 2013 - Fordham University Press.
    The twentieth century saw the rise of hermeneutics, the philosophical interpretation of texts, and eventually the application of its insights to metaphorical “texts” such as individual and group identities. It also saw the rise of modern environmentalism, which evolved through various stages in which it came to realize that many of its key concerns—“wilderness” and “nature” among them—are contested territory that are viewed differently by different people. Understanding nature requires science and ecology to be sure, but it also requires (...)
     
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  34.  33
    Rewilding in Layered Landscapes as a Challenge to Place Identity.Martin Drenthen - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (4):405-425.
    Rewilding is an increasingly popular strategy in landscape management, yet it is also controversial, especially when applied in culturally 'layered' landscapes. In this paper I examine what is morally at stake in debates between proponents of rewilding and those that see traditional cultural landscapes as worthy of protection. I will argue that rewilding should not only be understood as a conservation practice, but that we also need to understand its hermeneutic aspect. Rewilding implies a radical non-anthropocentric normative reinterpretation of landscape (...)
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  35.  12
    Landscapes Devoid of Meaning? A Reply to Note.Martin Drenthen - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (1):17-23.
    Even though artists and philosophers sometimes succeed in finding words for the meaning that places can have for us, we can never fully identify the meaning that places have for us. Nicole Note is right in arguing (using the work of Arnold Burms) that the ineffable plays a key role in the meaningful relations we have with the world, and that the experience of meaning can only emerge if there is a real risk that it fails to appear. Therefore, meaning (...)
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  36.  12
    Ecological Restoration and Place Attachment: Emplacing Non-Places?Martin Drenthen - 2009 - Environmental Values 18 (3):285-312.
    The creation of new wetlands along rivers as an instrument to mitigate flood risks in times of climate change seduces us to approach the landscape from a 'managerial' perspective and threatens a more place-oriented approach. How to provide ecological restoration with a broad cultural context that can help prevent these new landscapes from becoming nonplaces, devoid of meaning and with no real connection to our habitable world. In this paper, I discuss three possible alternative interpretations of the meaning of places (...)
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  37. Het Zwijgen van de Natuur - Een Respectvolle Houding ten Opzichte van de Natuur Houdt Noodzakelijkerwijs Ook Een Zekere Distantie In.Martin Drenthen - 1996 - Filosofie En Praktijk 17:187-199.
    Milieufilosofisch Nederland wordt momenteel verdeeld door een controverse naar aanleiding vanrecente publicaties van de Wageningse filosofen Keulartz en Korthals. In dit artikel wil ik - aande hand van een analyse van het gebruik van het natuurbegrip bij Wim Zweers - laten zien dat Keulartz op een tot nu toe onderbelicht probleem wijst: het probleem van de veelheid vannatuurbeelden. Tegelijkertijd wil ik echter aantonen dat Keulartz' eigen, 'post-naturalistische' positie op een tegenspraak berust. Tenslotte geef ik aan hoe deze controverses zijn terug (...)
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  38.  31
    Integral Archaeology: Process Methodologies for Exploring Prehistoric Rock Art on Ometepe Island, Nicaragua.Ryan Hurd - 2011 - Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):72-94.
    A process-based approach to archaeology combines traditional third-person data collection methods with first- and second-person inquiries. Drawing from the traditions of cognitive archaeology, transpersonal psychology, and ecopsychology, this mixed-methods approach can be thought of as a movement toward a more holistic or “integral” archaeology. By way of example, a prehistoric rock art site on Ometepe Island, Nicaragua is explored from the inside (through the researcher's lucid dreaming incubations) as well as in relationship with the researcher's embodied presence (an exploration of (...)
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  39. Fatal Attraction: Wildness in Contemporary Film.Martin Drenthen - 2009 - Environmental Ethics 31 (3):297-315.
    The concept of wildness not only plays a role in philosophical debates, but also in popular culture. Wild nature is often seen as a place outside the cultural sphere where one can still encounter instances of transcendence. Some writers and moviemakers contest the dominant romanticized view of wild nature by telling stories that somehow show a different harsher face of nature. In encounters with the wild and unruly, humans can sometimes experience the misfit between their well-ordered, human-centered, self-created world view (...)
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  40.  9
    Is Nature Natural? And Other Linguistic Conundrums.David Utsler - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):77-89.
    One of Scott Cameron’s most recent contributions to environmental hermeneutics was to defend the concept of nature against those who would argue that it should be abandoned in order to stave off the ecological destruction. Rather than jettison nature as an outdated and unhelpful construct, Cameron argued for its redemption based on Gadamer’s hermeneutical insights into language. In this article, I will look at Cameron’s arguments against Steven Vogel as well as particular points made against nature as a (...)
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  41.  13
    Dialogue with Nature and the Ecological Imperative.Mateusz Salwa - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 4 (4):123-135.
    The aim of the paper is to discuss the idea of dialogue with nature. Even though the idea of dialogue with animals, plants – even objects of inanimate nature – is well known, it has usually been treated as an expression of a naive or folk view. Yet, it has recently gained in importance as an idea that is used to describe an ecological approach to natural environment and tends to be treated as a foundation for an ecological culture. A (...)
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  42.  2
    Corporal Compassion: Animal Ethics and Philosophy of Body.Ralph R. Acampora - 2014 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
    Most approaches to animal ethics ground the moral standing of nonhumans in some appeal to their capacities for intelligent autonomy or mental sentience. _Corporal Compassion _emphasizes the phenomenal and somatic commonality of living beings; a philosophy of body that seeks to displace any notion of anthropomorphic empathy in viewing the moral experiences of nonhuman living beings. Ralph R. Acampora employs phenomenology, hermeneutics, existentialism and deconstruction to connect and contest analytic treatments of animal rights and liberation theory. In doing so, (...)
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  43.  1
    Corporal Compassion: Animal Ethics and Philosophy of Body.Ralph R. Acampora - 2006 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
    Most approaches to animal ethics ground the moral standing of nonhumans in some appeal to their capacities for intelligent autonomy or mental sentience. _Corporal Compassion _emphasizes the phenomenal and somatic commonality of living beings; a philosophy of body that seeks to displace any notion of anthropomorphic empathy in viewing the moral experiences of nonhuman living beings. Ralph R. Acampora employs phenomenology, hermeneutics, existentialism and deconstruction to connect and contest analytic treatments of animal rights and liberation theory. In doing so, (...)
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  44.  31
    Climate Change and the Need for Intergenerational Reparative Justice.Ben Almassi - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (2):199-212.
    Environmental philosophies concerning our obligations to each other and the natural world too rarely address the aftermath of environmental injustice. Ideally we would never do each other wrong; given that we do, as fallible and imperfect agents, we require non-ideal ethical guidance. Margaret Walker’s work on moral repair and Annette Baier’s work on cross-generational communality together provide useful hermeneutical tools for understanding and enacting meaningful responses to intergenerational injustice, and in particular, for anthropogenic climate change. By blending Baier’s (...)
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  45. Beyond Stewardship: Reimagining Our Kinship With Animals.Matthew C. Halteman & Megan Halteman Zwart - 2019 - In David Paul Warners & Matthew Kuperus Heun (eds.), Beyond Stewardship: New Approaches to Creation Care. Grand Rapids, USA: Calvin College Press. pp. 121-134.
    This book chapter is a work of popular philosophy that offers general readers an opportunity to reimagine their relationship to non-human creatures by living vicariously through the experience of Jasmin--a hypothetical college student whose encounters with a cow, goat, and rooster on a visit to a local farm trigger a transformation in her views and actions toward other animals, allowing her to see them for the first time as subjects of their own lives rather than as objects for human use. (...)
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  46.  6
    On The Poetry and Music of Science: Whose Poetry, Whose Music?Babette Babich - forthcoming - Interdisciplinary Science Reviews.
    Tom McLeish’s Music and Poetry of Science adds to along and complex literature looking at the creative powers of human genius. In addition to his own scientific field, McLeish draws on art, poetry, novels, music, and BBC television productions. Although positioned in the line of the ‘two cultures’ debate typically associated with C. P. Snow, McLeish reprises William Beveridge’s earlier contribution to that tradition, perhaps, to be aligned,although this McLeish does not do, with Peter Pesic’s Music and the Making of (...)
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  47.  33
    Landscapes Devoid of Meaning? A Reply to Nicole Note.Martin Drenthen - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (1):17-23.
    Even though artists and philosophers sometimes succeed in finding words for the meaning that places can have for us, we can never fully identify the meaning that places have for us. Nicole Note is right in arguing (using the work of Arnold Burms) that the ineffable plays a key role in the meaningful relations we have with the world, and that the experience of meaning can only emerge if there is a real risk that it fails to appear. Therefore, meaning (...)
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  48.  36
    Readers of the Book of Life: Contextualizing Developmental Evolutionary Biology.Anton Markoš - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a wide ranging and deeply learned examination of evolutionary developmental biology, and the foundations of life from the perspective of information theory. Hermeneutics was a method developed in the humanities to achieve understanding, in a given context, of texts, history, and artwork. In Readers of the Book of Life, the author shows that living beings are also hermeneutical interpreters of genetics texts saved in DNA; an interpretation based on the past experience of the cell (cell lineage, species), (...)
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  49.  7
    Is Environmentalism a Humanism?Lewis P. Hinchman - 2004 - Environmental Values 13 (1):3-29.
    Environmental theorists, seeking the origin of Western exploitative attitudes toward nature, have directed their attacks against 'humanism'. This essay argues that such criticisms are misplaced. Humanism has much closer affinities to environmentalism than the latter' s advocates believe. As early as the Renaissance, and certainly by the late eighteenth century, humanists were developing historically-conscious, hermeneutically-grounded modes of understanding, rather than the abstract, mathematical models of nature often associated with them. In its twentieth-century versions humanism also shares much of the (...)
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    Dwelling, Place and Environment: Towards a Phenomenology of Person and World.David Seamon & Robert Mugerauer (eds.) - 1985 - Krieger Pub. Co..
    themes among the essays resurface and resonate. Though our request for essays was broad and open-ended, we found that topics such as seeing, authenticity, interpretation, wholeness, care, and dwelling ran as undercur rents throughout. Our major hope is that each essay plays a part in revealing a larger whole of meaning which says much about a more humane relation ship with places, environments and the earth as our home. Part I. Beginnings and directions At the start, we recognize the tremendous (...)
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