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  1. Transecological Curiosity.Amy Marvin - 2021 - American Philosophical Association Studies on Lgbtq Philosophy 21 (1):10-12.
    In this short essay I connect Perry Zurn’s work on curiosity with trans history, activism, and art to bridge trans curiosity with eco curiosity in the form of transecological curiosity. I discuss examples from trans art, literature, music, and ecopoetics.
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  2. May Artificial Intelligence take health and sustainability on a honeymoon? Towards green technologies for multidimensional health and environmental justice.Cristian Moyano-Fernández, Jon Rueda, Janet Delgado & Txetxu Ausín - 2024 - Global Bioethics 35 (1).
    The application of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in healthcare and epidemiology undoubtedly has many benefits for the population. However, due to its environmental impact, the use of AI can produce social inequalities and long-term environmental damages that may not be thoroughly contemplated. In this paper, we propose to consider the impacts of AI applications in medical care from the One Health paradigm and long-term global health. From health and environmental justice, rather than settling for a short and fleeting green honeymoon between (...)
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  3. Rethinking a 1970s Timeline for a History of Enviornmental Ethics.Áila O'Loughlin & Ryan Mulloy - 2023 - Apa Studies on Native American and Indigenous Philosophy 23 (1):8-11.
  4. Environmental Philosophy in Context.Anna Wienhues - 2023 - Environmental Values 32 (6):675-682.
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  5. Suhteissa syntyvä toimijuus – kestävyysmuutoksen siemeniä lasten luontosuhteessa (Agency emerging from relations - seeds of sustainability transformation in child-nature relationships).Suvielise Nurmi - 2023 - In Pirjo Suvilehto, Pauliina Rautio & Veli-Matti Värri (eds.), Nuorten luonto eläimineen. Kohti monilajista nuorisotutkimusta. Finnish Youth Research Society. pp. 44-85.
  6. ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY OF ECUMENICAL PATRIARCH BARTHOLOMEW I.Halyna Ilina - 2022 - Sophia. Human and Religious Studies Bulletin 19:55-58.
    The article examines the ideas of environmentalism in the works and statements of His All Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I. The ecological concept of the "Green Patriarch" reveals the relations between religion and the environment. The cause of the environmental crisis is recognized as a crisis of spirituality. It is argued in the concept that utilitarian logic and ethics are not enough to change human behavior towards the environment – ecological thinking requires another worldview that can be found in religion. (...)
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  7. Einleitung zu „Was ist Natur? Klassische Texte zur Naturphilosophie“.Gregor Schiemann - 1996 - In Was ist Natur? Klassische Texte zur Naturphilosophie. Deutscher Taschenbuchverlag.
    "Wir mögen an der Natur beobachten, messen, rechnen, wägen und so weiter, wie wir wollen, es ist doch nur unser Maß und Gewicht, wie der Mensch das Maß der Dinge ist." So schrieb Goethe im Jahre 1807. "Die Natur wird uns keine Sonderbehandlung gewähren, nur weil wir uns als 'Krone der Schöpfung' betrachten... Ich fürchte, sie ist nicht eitel genug, um sich an den Menschen als einen Spiegel zu klammern, in dem allein sie ihre eigene Schönheit sehen kann", schreibt der (...)
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  8. Is Biocentrism Dead? Two Live Problems for Life-Centered Ethics.Joel MacClellan - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-22.
    Biocentrism, a prominent view in environmental ethics, is the notion that all and only individual biological organisms have moral status, which is to say that their good ought to be considered for its own sake by moral agents. I argue that biocentrism suffers two serious problems: the Origin Problem and the Normativity Problem. Biocentrism seeks to avoid the absurdity that artifacts have moral status on the basis that organisms have naturalistic origins whereas artifacts do not. The Origin Problem contends that, (...)
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  9. The Normative and Social Dimensions of the Transition Towards a Responsible, Circular Bio-Based Economy.Vincent Blok - 2023 - In Sally Lamalle & Peter Stoett (eds.), Representations and Rights of the Environment. cambridge UP. pp. 334-350.
    In this chapter, we will first argue that current practices in CBE are framed within the market or economic logic and miss the normative dimension of the call for circularity. The transition to the CBE requires a fundamental reflection on the role of economic actors in the social and ecological environment with significant consequences for their business practices. Second, we will argue that the transition to the CBE requires the acknowledgement of the normative and social dimensions of this transition at (...)
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  10. The Ethics of Gaia: Geoethics From an Evolutionary Perspective.Sofia Belardinelli & Telmo Pievani - 2023 - In Giuseppe Di Capua & Luiz Oosterbeek (eds.), Bridges to Global Ethics. Geoethics at the Confluence of Humanities and Sciences. Springer, Cham.. pp. 55-72.
    In times of unprecedented ecological change led by human activities, a global ethical framework is most needed to support the rapid transformation of current development models, to ensure the protection of human and non-human nature. Geoethics offers such a universal system of values. We assess to what extent geoethics maintains an anthropocentric perspective and examine the ethical challenges raised by this statement, arguing that (i) geoscientific knowledge, which investigates the interrelations between the biotic and abiotic world in a deep-time perspective, (...)
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  11. Melioristic genealogies and Indigenous philosophies.Helen De Cruz & Johan De Smedt - 2022 - Philosophical Forum (4):1-18.
    According to Mary Midgley, philosophy is like plumbing: like the invisible entrails of an elaborate plumbing system, philosophical ideas respond to basic needs that are fundamental to human life. Melioristic projects in philosophy attempt to fix or reroute this plumbing. An obstacle to melioristic projects is that the sheer familiarity of the underlying philosophical ideas renders the plumbing invisible. Philosophical genealogies aim to overcome this by looking at the origins of our current concepts. We discuss philosophical concepts developed in Indigenous (...)
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  12. Colonialist Values in Animal Crossing and Their Implications for Conservation.Alexis D. Smith - 2022 - Highlights of Sustainability 1 (1):129–133.
    In the Nintendo game Animal Crossing: New Horizons, players move to an uninhabited island and quickly become instrumental to the naming, aesthetic development, and biodiversity of the island. In some ways, the game can foster a love for and curiosity about nature. In other ways, the game reinforces harmful colonialist values and attitudes that are ultimately an obstacle to conservation in the real world. Here I critique the game values relevant to conservation, both the values that benefit and the values (...)
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  13. Buen Vivir: A Latin American Contribution to Intra- and Intergenerational Justice.Facundo García Valverde & Graciela Vidiella - forthcoming - In Stephen Gardiner (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Intergenerational Ethics. Oxford, Reino Unido:
    The concept of buen vivir (“good living”) has become an emergent discourse of resistance for social, ecological, and indigenous movements in Latin America, especially in Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. Due to the rebirth of theories of decolonization and its political impact against extractive practices, buen vivir has attracted attention both from academic and from political domains. Although there are different and conflicting conceptions of buen vivir, three common theses can be identified: the rejection of an anthropocentric moral ontology, the abandonment (...)
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  14. Indigenizing Philosophy Through the Land: A Trickster Methodology for Decolonizing Environmental Ethics and Indigenous Futures.Brian Burkhart - 2019 - East Lansing: Michigan State University Press.
    Land is key to the operations of coloniality, but the power of the land is also the key anticolonial force that grounds Indigenous liberation. This work is an attempt to articulate the nature of land as a material, conceptual, and ontological foundation for Indigenous ways of knowing, being, and valuing. As a foundation of valuing, land forms the framework for a conceptualization of Indigenous environmental ethics as an anticolonial force for sovereign Indigenous futures. This text is an important contribution in (...)
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  15. Pragmatic Environmentalism: Towards a Rhetoric of Eco-Justice.Shane Ralston - 2011 - Leicester: Troubador.
    Although this book is about the newly emerging academic field of environmental communication, it is also about voice and practical activism. I contend that a deeply pragmatic form of environmental communication has the potential to transform the way environmental activists speak about their methods and goals – moving them toward a rhetoric of eco-justice. Sometimes looking forward requires stepping back – in this case back to two progressive era thinkers who revolutionised our outlook on social and environmental justice: John Dewey (...)
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  16. Pragmatic Environmentalism: Towards a Rhetoric of Eco-Justice.Shane Ralston - 2011 - Leicester, UK: Troubador.
    Although this book is about the newly emerging academic field of environmental communication, it is also about voice and practical activism.
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  17. The effect of the environment on the physical appearance and mood of humans from the perspective of philosophers.Abduljaleel Kadhim Alwali - 2022 - International Journal of Sustainable Society 14 (No.1):pp.77 - 92.
    This paper seeks to examine the thought of philosophers about the influence of the environment on humans' physical, mental and moral habits, as well as how these philosophers used this influence to categorise individuals according to their habitat. As such this research begins with Herodotus and Hippocrates, and briefly discusses Plato, Aristotle, and seven medieval philosophers belonging to Jewish, Christian, and Islamic religions (Al-Kindi, Eriugena, Al-Farabi, Ibn Sina, Ibn Tufail, Averroes, and Moses Maimonides). Also, this study investigates Montesquieu from the (...)
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  18. Returning to our animal senses.David Abram - 1997 - Wild Earth 7:7-10.
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  19. Is there a need for a new, an ecological, understanding of legal animal rights?Favre Brian - 2020 - Journal of Human Rights and the Environment 11 (2):297-319.
    Legal animal rights may, in the short term, offer an efficient means to improve the living conditions of animals and how they are treated by human societies. This article argues that this shift to adopt an animal rights framing of the human-animal interaction might also risk producing certain counterproductive effects. It suggests that there is a need for a broader reassessment of the relationships between the human and animal worlds. This article posits that the adoption of legal animal rights as (...)
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  20. The Development of Ecological Thought: Contemporary Approaches and the Way Forward.Muhammad Jalil Arif - 2021 - Academia Letters 1 (Article 1008).
    This paper aims to identify and relate different ecological approaches (primarily Preservation and Conservation) that played a significant role in developing a global ecological conscience. After presenting a comprehensive historical account of the approaches and movements in ecological thought, at the end of the paper, I will briefly highlight the potential areas of future research that could develop and re-frame ecological thought that ensures collaboration, co-adaptation, and sustainability in the environmental ethos. I fully acknowledge the diverse environmental movements in different (...)
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  21. After Neoliberalism: From Eco-Marxism to Ecological Civilisation, Part 2.Arran Gare - 2021 - Capitalism Nature Socialism 32.
    This is Part 2 of an article aimed at defending Marx against orthodox Marxists to reveal the possibilities for overcoming capitalism. It is argued that Marx’s general theory of history is inconsistent with his profound insights into alienation and commodity fetishism as the foundations of capitalism. Humanist Marxists focused on the latter in opposition to Orthodox Marxists, but without fully acknowledging this inconsistency and its implications, failed to realize the full potential of Marx’s work. The outcome has been the triumph (...)
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  22. Fathoming Postnatural Oceans: Towards a low trophic theory in the practices of feminist posthumanities.Marietta Radomska & Cecilia Åsberg - 2021 - Environment and Planning E: Nature and Space 4:1-18.
    As the planet’s largest ecosystem, oceans stabilise climate, produce oxygen, store CO2 and host unfathomable biodiversity at a deep time-scale. In recent decades, scientific assessments have indicated that the oceans are seriously degraded to the detriment of most near-future societies. Human-induced impacts range from climate change, ocean acidification, loss of biodiversity, eutrophication and marine pollution to local degradation of marine and coastal environments. Such environmental violence takes form of both ‘spectacular’ events, like oil spills and ‘slow violence’, occurring gradually and (...)
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  23. An 'Ethics for the Transition': Schelling's Critique of Negative Philosophy and its Significance for Environmental Thought.Dalia Nassar - 2020 - In G. Anthony Bruno (ed.), Schelling’s Philosophy: Freedom, Nature, and Systematicity. Oxford University Press. pp. 231-248.
    Over the last four decades, environmental ethics has become an increasingly significant field of philosophy. Yet, many of its practitioners question its goals and effectiveness. Above all, environmental philosophers voice uncertainty about the extent to which the field has been able to influence action, behaviour, and policy in relation to the environment. What are the reasons behind this meagre influence and what kind of contrasting philosophical approach might enable transformative action? The goal of this paper is to answer these questions (...)
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  24. The Role of Environmental Ethics in building the Future of Civilized Societies.Abduljaleel Kadhim Alwali - 2015 - Dar Al-Nashire 1 (1):P.221-236.
    The concept of Environment is an ethical concept which was discussed by Greek philosophers at ancient time. Plato (347-427 BC) in his book Laws asks everyone who changes the environment to fix it as well. For example, if anyone pollutes the water well, they would also need to try to treat the pollution problem and compensate people for their loss due to the pollution problem. The Environment Ethics is a contemporary branch of philosophy. It has its own concepts that make (...)
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  25. Autonomy of artistic practices in the Anthropocene: political and ecological perspectives.Karolina Rybačiauskaitė - 2019 - Athena 14:221-233.
    In this article, it is claimed that by considering Rancière’s understanding of politics of aesthetics alongside Stengers’ conception of the ecology of practices, it is possible to think about the autonomy of artistic practices which would be created and sustained politically. Rancière demonstrates that the artistic autonomy was previously subordinated to a variety of historical imperatives, while Stengers warns about an apolitical mission of the great narrative of the Anthropocene. Both philosophers make a case for talking about the autonomy of (...)
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  26. Moral Consciousness and Environment.Mudasir Ahmad Tantray & Priyavrat Shukla - 2020 - Unnati International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research 2 (11):106-115.
    This research paper tries to describe the role of moral consciousness for the benefit and safety of environment. There are some burning issues in environment which has been discussed clearly in this write up. Since the purpose of this paper is only to encourage, motivate and make people conscious towards the protection of their nature which has been polluted and devastated by humans. This paper explains the importance of moral problems like ‘does human can cut forests for the construction of (...)
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  27. Sunlight as a Photosyntheic Information Technology.Yogi Hendlin - 2020 - In Plants in Science Fiction: Speculative Vegetation.
  28. Can a City Be Relocated? Exploring the Metaphysics of Context- Dependency.Fabio Bacchini & Nicola Piras - forthcoming - Argumenta.
    This paper explores the Persistence Question about cities, that is, what is necessary and sufficient for two cities existing at different times to be numerically identical. We first show that we can possibly put an end to the existence of a city in a number of ways other than by physically destroying it, which reveals the metaphysics of cities to be partly different from that of ordinary objects. Then we focus in particular on the commonly perceived vulnerability of cities to (...)
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  29. Indigenous, Modern and Postcolonial Relations to Nature: Negotiating the Environment.Angela C. M. Roothaan - 2019 - Abingdon, Verenigd Koninkrijk, New York, USA: Routledge.
    Indigenous, Modern and Postcolonial Relations to Naturecontributes to the young field of intercultural philosophy by introducing the perspective of critical and postcolonial thinkers who have focused on systematic racism, power relations and the intersection of cultural identity and political struggle. Angela Roothaan discusses how initiatives to tackle environmental problems cross-nationally are often challenged by economic growth processes in postcolonial nations and further complicated by fights for land rights and self-determination of indigenous peoples. For these peoples, survival requires countering the scramble (...)
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  30. The Biomimicry Revolution in Environmental Epistemology.Henry Dicks - 2019 - Ethics and the Environment 24 (2):43.
    Abstract:Environmental epistemology is at present a rather marginal branch of environmental philosophy. The aim of the present article is to propose a major new approach to environmental epistemology, which I propose to call “biomimetic epistemology,” the guiding principle of which is “nature as mentor,” and which, in keeping with this principle, takes as its subject matter both the idea and the phenomenon of learning from nature. Beginning with a brief sketch of biomimetic epistemology covering both its basic traits and its (...)
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  31. Situating Environmental Philosophy in Canada.C. Tyler DesRoches, Frank Jankunis & Byron Williston - 2019 - In C. Tyler DesRoches, Frank Jankunis & Byron Williston (eds.), Canadian Environmental Philosophy. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The volume includes topics from political philosophy and normative ethics on the one hand to philosophy of science and the philosophical underpinnings of water management policy on the other. It contains reflections on ecological nationalism, the legacy of Grey Owl, the meaning of ‘outside’ to Canadians, the paradigm shift from mechanism to ecology in our understanding of nature, the meaning of the concept of the Anthropocene, the importance of humans self-identifying as ‘earthlings’, the challenges of biodiversity protection and the status (...)
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  32. Being Like Gaia: Biomimicry and Ecological Ethics.Henry Dicks - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (5):601-620.
    This article analyses the philosophical status and ground of biomimicry's most distinctive principle: nature as measure. Starting with the argument that this principle is ethically normative, I go on to compare the ecological ethic it embodies with Aldo Leopold's land ethic. In so doing, I argue that the ultimate measure against which the ethical rightness of our actions should be judged is the way of being of Gaia, which is to let be her present inhabitants. I then explore the idea (...)
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  33. Climate Change, Autonomy of Nature, and Animal Suffering: Rethinking Borders between Animal Ethics and Environmental Ethics.Ely Mermans - 2018 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 13 (1):4-16.
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  34. Earth as a Life-raft and Ethics as the Raft’s Axe.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2015 - In Irina Deretić & Stefan Lorenz Sorgner (eds.), From Humanism to Meta-, Post- and Transhumanism? New York: Peter Lang. pp. 227-242.
    A common metaphor on our planet portrays it as a rescue boat for life that travels in an endless see of cosmic darkness. If this metaphor is to be considered a precise one, this would mean that the earth is the only chance for life to survive the journey – at least as far as animal life is concerned. Apart from this, however, the metaphor implies that our planet is also very fragile, and that its carrying capacity is limited. Now, (...)
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  35. Environmental Ethics and Linkola’s Ecofascism: An Ethics Beyond Humanism.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2014 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 9 (4):586-601.
    Ecofascism as a tradition in Environmental Ethics seems to burgeoning with potential. The roots of Ecofascism can be traced back to the German Romantic School, to the Wagnerian narration of the Nibelungen saga, to the works of Fichte and Herder and, finally, to the so-called völkisch movement. Those who take pride in describing themselves as ecofascists grosso modo tend to prioritize the moral value of the ecosphere, while, at the same time, they almost entirely devalue species and individuals. Additionally, these (...)
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  36. David Storey, Naturalizing Heidegger: His Confrontation With Nietzsche, His Contributions to Environmental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Chad Engelland - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2015:09.11.
  37. The Poetics of Biomimicry.Henry Dicks - 2017 - Environmental Philosophy 14 (2):191-219.
    The Ancient Greeks understood both art and technology (techne) as imitation (mimesis) of Nature (physis). This article argues that the rapidly growing ecological innovation strategy known as biomimicry makes it possible for technology to leave behind the modern goal of “mastering and possessing” Nature and instead to rediscover the initial vocation it shared with art: imitating Nature. This in turn suggests a general strategy for philosophical inquiry into the biomimetic principle of “Nature as model”: the transposition of philosophical analyses of (...)
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  38. Paul Warren Taylor.Mylan Engel Jr - 2008 - In Encyclopedia of Environmental Ethics and Philosophy, Vol. 2. Detroit, MI: Gale Cengage Learning. pp. 302-304.
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  39. Self-Validating Reduction: Toward a Theory of Environmental Devaluation.Anthony Weston - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (2):115-132.
    Disvaluing nature—a cognitive act—usually leads quickly to devaluing it too: to real-world exploitation and destruction. Worse, in fact, nature in its devalued state can then be held up as an excuse and justification for the initial disvaluation. In this way, dismissal and destruction perpetuate themselves. I call this process “self-validating reduction.” It is crucial to recognize the cycle of self-validating reduction, both in general and specifically as it applies to nature, if we are to have any chance of reversing it.
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  40. Using and Abusing Nietzsche for Environmental Ethics.Ralph R. Acampora - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):187-194.
    Max Hallman has put forward an interpretation of Nietzsche’s philosophy according to which Nietzsche is a prototypical deep ecologist. In reply, I dispute Hallman’s main interpretive claim as well as its ethical and exegetical corollaries. I hold that Nietzsche is not a “biospheric egalitarian,” but rather an aristocratically individualistic “high humanist.” A consistently naturalistic transcendentalist, Nietzsche does submit a critique of modernity’s Christian-inflected anthropocentrism (pace Hallman), and yet—in his later work—he endorses exploitation in the quest for nobility (contra Hallman). I (...)
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  41. Intimacy without Proximity.Jacob Metcalf - 2008 - Environmental Philosophy 5 (2):99-128.
    Using grizzly-human encounters as a case study, this paper argues for a rethinking of the differences between humans and animals within environmental ethics. A diffractive approach that understands such differences as an effect of specific material and discursive arrangements (rather than as pre-settled and oppositional) would see ethics as an interrogation of which arrangements enable flourishing, or living and dying well. The paper draws on a wide variety of human-grizzly encounters in order to describe the species as co-constitutive and challenges (...)
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  42. The Pragmatic Pyramid: John Dewey on Gardening and Food Security.Shane J. Ralston - 2014 - Social Philosophy Today 30 (1):63-76.
    Despite the minimal attention paid by philosophers to gardening, the activity has a myriad of philosophical implications—aesthetic, ethical, political, and even edible. The same could be said of community food security and struggles for food justice. Two of gardening’s most significant practical benefits are that it generates communal solidarity and provides sustenance for the needy and undernourished during periods of crisis. In the twentieth century, large-scale community gardening in the U.S. and Canada coincided with relief projects during war-time and economic (...)
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  43. Earth Stewardship: Linking Ecology and Ethics in Theory and Practice.Melissa Clarke - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):121-124.
  44. Nietzsche and Ecology Revisited.David E. Storey - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):19-45.
    There has been relatively little debate about Nietzsche’s place in environmental ethics, but the lines of the debate are well marked. He has been viewed as an anthropocentrist by Michael E. Zimmerman, a humanist by Ralph Acampora, a biocentrist and deep ecolo­gist by Max Hallman, a constructivist by Martin Drenthen, and an ecocentrist by Graham Parkes. Nietzsche does provide a theory of intrinsic value and his philosophy of nature is germane to an environmerntal ethic. His philosophical biology grounds his value (...)
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  45. On Ecology and Aesthetic Experience A Feminist Theory of Value and Praxis.Wendy Lynne Lee - 2006 - Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):21-41.
    My aim is to develop a feminist theory of value—an axiology—which unites two notions that seem to have little in common for a theorizing whose ultimate goal is justice-driven emancipatory action, namely, the ecological and the aesthetic. In this union lies the potential for a critical feminist political praxis capable of appreciating not only the value of human life, but those relationships upon which human and nonhuman life depend. A vital component of this praxis is, I argue, the potential for (...)
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  46. Anthropocentrism, Artificial Intelligence, and Moral Network Theory: An Ecofeminist Perspective.Victoria Davion - 2002 - Environmental Values 11 (2):163-176.
    This paper critiques a conception of intelligence central in AI, and a related concept of reason central in moral philosophy, from an ecological feminist perspective. I argue that ecofeminist critique of human/nature dualisms offers insight into the durability of both problematic conceptions, and into the direction of research programmes. I conclude by arguing for the importance of keeping political analysis in the forefront of science and environmental ethics.
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  47. Review of Elena R. Álvarez-Buylla and Alma Piñeyro Nelson (eds.), El maíz en peligro ante los transgénicos: Un análisis integral sobre el caso de México[REVIEW]Irina Castro - 2015 - Environmental Values 24 (4):563-566.
  48. The Nazi Comparison in the Debate over Restoration: Nativism and Domination.Eric Katz - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (4):377-398.
    In this essay, I discuss the comparison between the restoration of natural environments and the Nazi project to develop a pure homeland for native species and authentic Aryan humans. There exists a metaphorical comparison between Nazi eliminationist policies regarding specific human populations and the eradication of invasive and non-native species in ecological restorations. Moreover, there are substantive environmental policies of the Nazi regime that appear to be similar to the goals and methodology of contemporary restoration practice. But there is also (...)
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  49. From Field to Fork: Food Ethics for Everyone.Paul B. Thompson - 2015 - New York: Oxford University Press USA.
    After centuries of neglect, the ethics of food are back with a vengeance. Justice for food workers and small farmers has joined the rising tide of concern over the impact of industrial agriculture on food animals and the broader environment, all while a global epidemic of obesity-related diseases threatens to overwhelm modern health systems. An emerging worldwide social movement has turned to local and organic foods, and struggles to exploit widespread concern over the next wave of genetic engineering or nanotechnologies (...)
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  50. Ecopolitical Theory: Essays from Australia.P. R. Hay & Robyn Eckersley (eds.) - 1992 - Board of Environmental Studies, University of Tasmania.
    "These essays are respectfully dedicated to the memory of Dr Richard Jones".
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