Philosophy of Psychiatry and Psychopathology

Edited by Şerife Tekin (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Assistant editor: Jaipreet Mattu (University of Western Ontario)
About this topic
Summary Philosophy of Psychiatry and Psychopathology occurs at the intersection of general philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, and ethics. It aims to develop answers to a set of theoretical and practical questions pertaining to the nature of mental disorders, mental health research, and practice.
Key works [BROKEN REFERENCE: RADDAEw]#MURPIT Radden 2004 Graham 2002 Fulford 2006 Poland 2011 Thornton 2007 Sadler 2004 Hacking 1995 Flanagan 1999 Schaffner 1993
Introductions Fulford & Sadler 2009 [BROKEN REFERENCE: NATTNPw]#MARPN
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  1. Socrates' Maieutics and the Ethical Foundations of Psychotherapy.Otto Doerr-Zegers - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (4):279-285.
    Abstract:Since Homeric times, psychotherapy has been an essential part of the medical act. Initially, the word of physicians had a magical character. Plato rationalizes this in many of his dialogues. In "Charmides," he dives deeper into this matter and proposes to apply it to every disease. Analysing this dialogue has fundamental consequences for psychotherapy: 1) Remedy and epodé (charm) must be applied in every doctor–patient relationship. 2) The body can only be healed if the soul is cured first by a (...)
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  2. Understanding and Healing.Otto Doerr-Zegers - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (4):293-298.
    First, I would like to thank Dr. Phillips for his generous words about the potential interest of my work. He speaks about the fact that it is "insightful" and thought-provoking ("it offers us much to think about"). In his comment Dr. Phillips reviews the main moments of the evolution of treatment by words in the Greek world and he focuses on Plato's Dialogue Charmides, whose analysis is the center of my article. He even quotes some parts of the dialogue, which (...)
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  3. Exclusion of the Psychopathologized and Hermeneutical Ignorance Threaten Objectivity.Bennett Knox - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (4):253-266.
    Abstract:This article brings together considerations from philosophical work on standpoint epistemology, feminist philosophy of science, and epistemic injustice to examine a particular problem facing contemporary psychiatry: the conflict between the conceptual resources of psychiatric medicine and alternative conceptualizations like those of the neurodiversity movement and psychiatric abolitionism. I argue that resistance to fully considering such alternative conceptualizations in processes such as the revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders emerges in part from a particular form of epistemic (...)
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  4. Revisiting Greek Psychiatry.James Phillips - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (4):291-292.
    Dr. Otto Doerr-Zegers's article is so interesting and insightful that I have nothing critical to say about it. On the other hand, in finding Greek, mainly Platonic, origins for psychotherapy, he offers us much to think about. In this brief commentary I will attempt to draw out some of the implications of his analysis for contemporary psychotherapy.Doerr-Zegers's analysis begins with a reflection on Socrates' Maieutics, Socrates' invoking the midwife metaphor to convey his use of dialectics to bring forth the ignorance (...)
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  5. Recognizing Wounds and Giving Uptake The Undoing of Dominant Collective Memories.Emily Walsh - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (4):249-251.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Recognizing Wounds and Giving Uptake The Undoing of Dominant Collective MemoriesEmily Walsh*, PhD (bio)I want to begin this response by thanking Dr. Kirmayer and Dr. Potter for taking the time to craft insightful and intellectually stimulating responses to my article. Both commentaries enabled me to clarify the complexity of the question of how best to commence the undoing of dominant collective memories (DCMs) in psychiatry. In this response, I (...)
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  6. Decolonizing Memory.Laurence J. Kirmayer - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (4):243-248.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Decolonizing MemoryLaurence J. Kirmayer*, MD (bio)In this far-reaching essay, Emily Walsh explores the significance of memory for coming to grips with the enduring legacy of colonialism in psychiatry. She argues that "for reasons of self-preservation, racialized individuals should reject collective memories underwritten by colonialism." Psychiatry can enable this process or collude with the structures of domination to silence and disable those who bear the brunt of the colonialist history (...)
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  7. Memory and the Instituting Social Imaginary.Nancy Nyquist Potter - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (4):241-242.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Memory and the Instituting Social ImaginaryNancy Nyquist Potter*, PhD (bio)Emily Walsh's Article on the way that colonialism is perpetuated in psychiatry through dominant collective memory is simultaneously exciting and challenging, and merits active engagement toward making changes (Walsh, 2022). This presents a challenge to clinicians to address entrenched, often subconscious, ways of being with and helping racialized people with historical memories and current experiences.Such changes are necessary in that (...)
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  8. Memory, Colonialism, and Psychiatry How Collective Memories Underwrite Madness.Emily Walsh - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (4):223-239.
    Abstract:This article defends the idea that colonialism still has a grasp on a valuable tool in the construction of our reality: memory. Developments in cognitive neuroscience and interdisciplinary memory studies propose that memory is far more creative and tied to one's imaginal capacities than we used to believe, suggesting that remembering is not simply a reproductive process, but a complex reconstructive process. Drawing on the psychiatric works of Frantz Fanon, in Alienation & Freedom; Black Skin, White Masks; and Wretched of (...)
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  9. Epistemic Injustice in Psychiatric Research and Practice.Ian James Kidd, Lucienne Spencer & Havi Carel - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 1.
    This paper offers an overview of the philosophical work on epistemic injustices as it relates to psychiatry. After describing the development of epistemic injustice studies, we survey the existing literature on its application to psychiatry. We describe how the concept of epistemic injustice has been taken up into a range of debates in philosophy of psychiatry, including the nature of psychiatric conditions, psychiatric practices and research, and ameliorative projects. The final section of the paper indicates future directions for philosophical research (...)
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  10. Reactive Natural Kinds and Varieties of Dependence.Harriet Fagerberg - 2022 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 12 (4):1-27.
    This paper asks when a natural disease kind is truly 'reactive' and when it is merely associated with a corresponding social kind. I begin with a permissive account of real kinds and their structure, distinguishing natural kinds, indifferent kinds and reactive kinds as varieties of real kind characterised by super-explanatory properties. I then situate disease kinds within this framework, arguing that many disease kinds prima facie are both natural and reactive. I proceed to distinguish ‘simple dependence’, ‘secondary dependence’ and ‘essential (...)
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  11. This equivocal dust: a review of Material Cultures of Psychiatry , edited by M Ankele and B Majerus. [REVIEW]George Tudorie - 2022 - History of Psychiatry 33:490-494.
    In painting portraits, artists used to subtly place objects which reflected the biography or ambitions of the subject, but it is only more recently that objects which were part of the everyday life of institutionalized individuals became themselves part of the narratives offered by historians and other scholars of psychiatry. Excavating these remains – and finding ways to listen to them – is part of telling a fuller story of the people who lived for many years in mental institutions, and (...)
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  12. Material Encounters: A Phenomenological Account of Social Interaction in Autism.Sofie Boldsen - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):191-208.
    Abstract:Since the birth of autism as a psychiatric category, autistic individuals have been described as preoccupied with the world of objects and detached from the world of subjects, thus marking a distinction between the “social” and the “non-social” still prevalent in autism research and diagnostic criteria. The aim of this article is to question this distinction by examining the role of things in autistic forms of social interaction. Drawing on qualitative data from an ongoing qualitative and phenomenological study on social (...)
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  13. Psychiatric Disorders Are Soft Natural Kinds.Dan J. Stein - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):183-185.
    Tilmes concludes his interesting and informative piece with the sentence that “analysis of psychiatric vagueness merits further consideration.” I agree with this point, as well as with his earlier assertion that how one understands psychiatric vagueness may implicate the diagnostic model that one adopts, and the research that one pursues. Fortunately, there has been recent attention to vagueness in psychiatry, addressing both degree-vagueness and combinatorial vagueness.Vagueness in psychiatry is related to a range of nosological debates, including about the...
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  14. It's in the Attitude.Tim Thornton - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):179-181.
    In “semantic vagueness in Psychiatric Nosology,” Nicholas Tilmes offers a conditional claim for further consideration. The conditional is that “if psychiatric vagueness exists, there is reason to think that some cases of it are at least partially semantic.” From this, some conclusions worth investigating follow. In this brief commentary I will set out a question Tilmes introduces by, like him, drawing on a paper by Miriam Schoenfield, which also examines vagueness as semantic, epistemic or ontic though she draws a contrasting (...)
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  15. Examining Assumptions about Vagueness.Nicholas Tilmes - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):187-189.
    Ithank the commenters for their insightful remarks, from which I have learned much. In my article, I sought to explain psychiatric vagueness, which arises in borderline cases where there is no fact of the matter as to whether a diagnosis rightly can be said to apply.1 I argued “if psychiatric vagueness exists, then some of it is at least partially semantic”. A semantic account holds that vague utterances express different propositions since small gaps in how linguistic communities apply terms modify (...)
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  16. Distressed But Not Helpless.Katie Harster - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):165-168.
    Both woody and Wharne provided insightful commentary on my view that survivors of trauma have a duty to repair any impaired natural powers caused by symptoms of trauma by seeking empirically informed treatment. While Woody agrees with the main aspects of my view, they disagree with the motivation for seeking treatment. Woody argues that the “helplessness” caused by symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder should motivate survivors to pursue treatment. I disagree with this characterization and will discuss my concerns in the (...)
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  17. Semantic Vagueness in Psychiatric Nosology.Nicholas Tilmes - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):169-178.
    Abstract:Many discussions in the philosophy of psychiatry hinge on, among other things, the concepts of disorders, the role of underlying mechanisms, and the merits of various diagnostic models. Yet, some such disputes rest on assumptions about vagueness in the sense of susceptibility to the Sorites paradox as opposed to mere uncertainty in clinical practice. Studying borderline cases of psychiatric conditions—those where it is indeterminate whether applying a diagnosis is appropriate—may shed light on broader debates about the nature and boundaries of (...)
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  18. Immanuel Kant and the Task of Understanding Another's Lived-Experience.Simon Wharne - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):161-163.
    Professor katie harster has considered the phenomenon of psychological trauma, bringing philosophical understandings into play. She provides an informed account of observed “symptoms,” and associated treatments. I comment as a counseling psychologist, although I do not specialize in the evidence-based treatments that she describes. Usually, in my work with clients, we are trying to make sense of what has happened, with a concern for what might happen in the future. I am grateful therefore to colleagues who have the expertise that (...)
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  19. Symptoms of Trauma, Kantian Natural Powers, and the Duty to Seek Treatment.Katie Harster - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):147-157.
    Abstract:Most mental health conditions, though appropriate targets of treatment, do not generate a moral obligation to seek treatment. Trauma, in contrast, is caused (at least in part) by an external event that can happen at any point in the individual’s life. Survivors often experience diverse and enduring symptoms that adversely affect their cognitive, social, emotional, and physical functioning (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). These global impairments diminish an individual’s ability to respond appropriately to morally relevant reasons and stimuli. Fortunately, symptoms of (...)
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  20. Recovering Duty.J. Melvin Woody - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):159-160.
    One must freely admit that there is here a sort of circle from which, so it seems, there is no way of escape. In order the order of efficient causes, we assume that we are free so that we may think of ourselves as subject to moral laws in the order of ends. And we think of ourselves as subject to these laws because we have attributed to ourselves freedom of the will. Freedom and self-legislation of the will are both (...)
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  21. On the Actuality and Virtuality of Autistic Encounters: Respecting the Autistic Voice and Reimagining the Social.Sofie Boldsen - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):217-220.
    Autism is a highly heterogeneous phenomenon. Not only is it difficult to understand the various and diverse aspects of autism, their relation to each other is also complex and still poorly understood. In my article, “Material encounters. A phenomenological account of social interaction in autism,” I have addressed this heterogeneity by presenting an understanding of how social features of autism relate to behavioral features. Straddling this divide between the social and the non-social that still pervades much thinking in philosophy, psychiatry, (...)
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  22. Matters of the Autistic Mind: What Is the Role of Material Objects in Social Interaction?Derek Strijbos - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):213-216.
    Is autism a condition internal to the person that causes problems in social interaction? Or should we conceive of autism primarily at the level of interaction, as a “two-way” phenomenon that develops in the relation between the person with autism and her social-material environment? Over the last decade or so, this issue has increasingly gained interest, not only in academia, but also in the field of mental health care and in the wider public domain.Much is at stake here. Framing autism (...)
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  23. Mediated Encounters in Autistic Spectrum Disorder: From the Material to the Digital.Lucy Osler - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (3):209-211.
    Research on autistic spectrum disorder commonly describes autistic individuals as displaying: i) a preoccupation with the world of objects and ii) a withdrawal or detachment from the world of subjects. In her insightful and persuasive article, Sofie Boldsen argues that we should not fall into the trap of viewing the world of objects and the world of subjects in isolation from one another. Drawing from her qualitative and phenomenological study on social interaction in ASD, Boldsen urges us to recognize how (...)
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  24. Lesbian and bisexual women's experiences of aversion therapy in England.Helen Spandler & Sarah Carr - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):218-236.
    This article presents the findings of a study about the history of aversion therapy as a treatment technique in the English mental health system to convert lesbians and bisexual women into heterosexual women. We explored published psychiatric and psychological literature, as well as lesbian, gay, and bisexual archives and anthologies. We identified 10 examples of young women receiving aversion therapy in England in the 1960s and 1970s. We situate our discussion within the context of post-war British and transnational medical history. (...)
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  25. Schizophrenia, Temporality, and Affection.Jae Ryeong Sul - 2022 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 21 (4):927-947.
    Temporal experience and its radical alteration in schizophrenia have been one of the central objects of investigation in phenomenological psychopathology. Various phenomenologically oriented researchers have argued that the change in the mode of temporal experience present in schizophrenia can foreground its psychotic symptoms of delusion. This paper aims to further the development of such a phenomenological investigation by highlighting a much-neglected aspect of schizophrenic temporal experience, i.e., its non-emotional affective characteristic. In this paper, it denotes the type of an experience (...)
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  26. What is a Mental Disorder? A Perspective from Cognitive-Affective Science.Dan Stein - 2013 - Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 12 (58):656-662.
  27. Using Network Models in Person-Centered Care in Psychiatry: How Perspectivism Could Help To Draw Boundaries.Nina de Boer, Daniel Kostić, Marcos Ross, Leon de Bruin & Gerrit Glas - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychiatry, Section Psychopathology 13 (925187).
    In this paper, we explore the conceptual problems arising when using network analysis in person- centered care (PCC) in psychiatry. Personalized network models are potentially helpful tools for PCC, but we argue that using them in psychiatric practice raises boundary problems, i.e., problems in demarcating what should and should not be included in the model, which may limit their ability to provide clinically-relevant knowledge. Models can have explanatory and representational boundaries, among others. We argue that we can make more explicit (...)
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  28. Making Medical Science More Scientific: Embracing Uncertainty and Complexity.Mona Gupta - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):125-126.
    Scott Waterman's reflection on his experience with chronic pain and alternative treatments raises a fundamental question in medical epistemology: How can we know that an intervention will help people who are suffering?Waterman's details his trial of an alternative therapy with a dubious pathophysiological rationale. Despite the lack of research demonstrating its efficacy, and a lack of therapeutic benefit for him in particular, he acknowledges its benefit to others who were more attitudinally predisposed to it. This leads him to conclude that (...)
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  29. Epistemic Humility, Justice, and Honesty in Clinical Care.G. Scott Waterman - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):127-130.
    When we sit down to write an article that we plan to submit for publication, it is usually because we have completed some piece of empirical or conceptual work that has led us to conclusions we wish to share with our scholarly communities. In this instance, though, my essay under discussion was itself the means by which I sought to draw some conclusions about my recent experiences. Contrary to my initial plans—and my custom—I began writing without a clear idea of (...)
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  30. Epistemic Humility, Wisdom, and Cognitive Neuroscience.Mary "Molly" Camp - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):117-119.
    Waterman's clinical anecdote highlights several important concepts related to aging, as his own journey with chronic pain leads him to explore an "unconventional" craniosacral therapy. He draws important connections between epistemic humility and wisdom, and he touches on related topics of cognitive neuroscience and ageism. In particular, his comment that, "Perhaps one hallmark of successful aging is when the growth of wisdom outpaces the depletion of mental plasticity" is ripe for further discussion.Waterman asks the question of whether epistemic humility results (...)
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  31. The Virtue of Epistemic Humility.Nancy Nyquist Potter - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):121-123.
    Ethics, including medical ethics, has historically paid insufficient attention to epistemic rights and wrongs. This neglect fails to recognize the ways ethics and epistemology are intertwined. In the past fifteen years or so, there has been an interest in epistemic issues in medical practices, relationships with patients, and what is called epistemic injustice. Miranda Fricker identifies a kind of epistemic wrong as an injustice and a harm because it diminishes the speaker's capacity of a knower and treats her as uncredible (...)
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  32. Being and Pain.Jason M. Thompson - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):115-116.
    When a person in pain seeks medical attention, but his doctors cannot help him, a quest begins for alternative treatment, with its attendant imperative to identify the difference between genuine solace and snake oil. This is the task undertaken by Scott Waterman, and the situation faced by millions of people in chronic pain for whom conventional medicine proves ineffective, and who likewise then embark on a desperate search for comfort.Alternative treatments sit on a spectrum of empirical plausibility, from some like (...)
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  33. "More Things in Heaven and Earth": The Worldly Situated Human Person Perspective.Julian C. Hughes - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):107-109.
    It might seem too obvious to start with this quotation:O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!And therefore as a stranger give it welcome.There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.But then, I think it is obviously correct, as Professor Waterman suggests, that "There are more things in heaven and earth" than simply the application of the scientific method to medical practice. Perhaps there are two quick comments to make about the quotation. (...)
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  34. Exploring Epistemic Humility and its Limits in Therapeutics.Douglas Porter - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):111-113.
    I would like to thank Scott Waterman for sharing what must have been very challenging personal circumstances. Waterman's reflections touched upon many complex issues. For my part, I would like to explore how Waterman's experience underscores the importance of epistemic humility regarding the limits of scientific knowledge and our sense of the meaning of scientific knowledge while still recognizing the significance and power of scientific knowledge. The first epistemic challenge presented by Scott Waterman's experience of "patienthood" that demonstrates the limits (...)
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  35. Epistemic Humility: Accruing Wisdom or Forsaking Standards?G. Scott Waterman - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):101-106.
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  36. The Epistemic Relevance of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.Chloe Bamboulis & Lisa Bortolotti - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):91-93.
    Ratnayake's interesting paper challenges two claims, that cognitive distortions in depression involve epistemic issues; and that cognitive behavioral therapy can rectify those epistemic issues. We are going to discuss both claims here and offer some reasons not to underestimate the epistemic relevance of CBT. First, there may be epistemic issues underlying cognitive distortions in depression that CBT can effectively address, including blind acceptance of negative automatic thoughts and insensitivity to evidence. But, even if CBT were primarily in the business of (...)
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  37. Proof of Efficacy Is No Proof of Validity in Psychotherapy.Jens Gaab - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):95-96.
    Psychotherapy is entrusted with the ingrate mission to fight an enigmatic and demanding scourge of humanity—mental illnesses—with all its emotional suffering and personal distress, let alone their behavioral, physiological, interpersonal and societal consequences–and if this would not be enough a challenge, psychotherapists are left alone to their own devices, which is nothing more than words and wisdom. Thus, the feat to achieve clinically relevant sustainable changes and reductions in face of these demands and possibilities can hardly be overrated.It might be (...)
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  38. It's Been Utility All Along: An Alternate Understanding of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and The Depressive Realism Hypothesis.Sahanika Ratnayake - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (2):75-89.
    It is a truth universally known but not oft discussed that a journal article is often a fragment of a larger series of thoughts, or a longer piece of work. In entering into dialogue with Gaab and Bamboulis and Bortolotti, I will briefly describe the context of this paper, in the hopes that it will clarify my commitments and wider thinking on this area.This paper isolates one thread of my doctoral dissertation evaluating what I take to be two central theoretical (...)
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  39. Against the generalised theory of function.Harriet Fagerberg - 2022 - Biology and Philosophy 37 (4):1-25.
    Justin Garson has recently advanced a Generalised Selected Effects Theory of biological proper function. According to Garson, his theory spells trouble for the Dysfunction Account of Disorder. This paper argues that Garson’s critique of the Dysfunction Account from the Generalised Theory fails, and that we should reject the Generalised Theory outright. I first show that the Generalised Theory does not, as Garson asserts, imply that neurally selected disorders are not dysfunctional. Rather, it implies that they are both functional and dysfunctional. (...)
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  40. Questioning the Body: Certainties between Epistemology and Psychopathologies.Claudio Fabbroni - forthcoming - In International Ludwig Wittgenstein Symposium. Zagabria, Croazia: Faculty of Philosophy and Religious Studies, University of Zagreb.
    Having a body is one of those unquestionable certainties of which we could not really understand the negation: the latter would not be a legitimate doubt in our linguistic, and therefore the epistemic game. In facts, according to Wittgenstein, contravening certain cornerstones of our language game implies that the used combination of words is being excluded from the game, withdrawn from circulation. The idea of this paper is that what a mental illness is, prima facie, comes from here. Seriously questioning (...)
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  41. Maladjustment.Michaela McSweeney - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-27.
    Martin Luther King Jr. claimed that “the salvation of the world lies in the hands of the maladjusted”. I elaborate on King’s claim by focusing on the way in which we treat and understand ‘maladjustment’ that is responsive to severe trauma (e.g. PTSD that is a result of military combat or rape). Mental healthcare and our social attitudes about mental illness and disorder will prevent us from recognizing real injustice that symptoms of mental illness can be appropriately responding to, unless (...)
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  42. Understanding Substance Use Disorders Among Veterans: Virtues of the Multitudinous Self Model.Şerife Tekin - 2022 - In Evaluating the Brain Disease Model of Addiction.
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  43. 'So Don't You Lock up Something / That You Wanted to See Fly'. What Story for Asylum Psychiatry? [REVIEW]George Tudorie - 2021 - Romanian Journal of Communication and Public Relations 23:71-79.
    In a rather long piece which an exhibition catalog has called „catholic propaganda”(Busch & Maisak, 2013, p. 342), Guido Görres reflected on madness and art, using Kaulbach’s iconic 1835 drawing of asylum inmates (Das Narrenhaus) as pretext. Görres wrote of “this hospital of the human spirit (…), this charnel ground of the living, who like specters roam, wearing on their foreheads the faded and almost illegible traces of their former names.”1(1836, p. 9). Overdramatic prose, but unlikely to strike one as (...)
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  44. Review of 'Madness Is Civilization' by Michael Staub. [REVIEW]George Tudorie - 2013 - Metapsychology.
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  45. Review of 'Making Minds and Madness: From Hysteria to Depression' by Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen. [REVIEW]George Tudorie - 2011 - Metapsychology.
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  46. Review of 'The Measure of Madness' by Philip Gerrans. [REVIEW]George Tudorie - 2016 - Metapsychology.
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  47. The ignoring of Raymond Tallis on literary theory and the SYSTEMS THEORY of gender differences.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    Why was Raymond Tallis’s book Not Saussure largely ignored by literary critics? Here I present one response to this question: he does not offer a novel alternative system for literary interpretation. And I consider whether the situation is any different in other fields, introducing a rival to Simon Baron-Cohen’s empathizing-systematizing theory of gender differences when doing so.
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  48. Cognitive Ontology: Taxonomic Practices in the Mind-Brain Sciences.Muhammad Ali Khalidi - 2022 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    The search for the “furniture of the mind” has acquired added impetus with the rise of new technologies to study the brain and identify its main structures and processes. Philosophers and scientists are increasingly concerned to understand the ways in which psychological functions relate to brain structures. Meanwhile, the taxonomic practices of cognitive scientists are coming under increased scrutiny, as researchers ask which of them identify the real kinds of cognition and which are mere vestiges of folk psychology. Muhammad Ali (...)
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  49. What underlies death/suicide implicit association test measures and how it contributes to suicidal action.René Baston - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology:1-24.
    Recently, psychologists have developed indirect measurement procedures to predict suicidal behavior. A prominent example is the Death/Suicide Implicit Association Test (DS-IAT). In this paper, I argue that there is something special about the DS-IAT which distinguishes it from different IAT measures. I argue that the DS-IAT does not measure weak or strong associations between the implicit self-concept and the abstract concept of death. In contrast, assuming a goal-system approach, I suggest that sorting death-related to self-related words takes effort because death-related (...)
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  50. On the very idea of an extreme female brain.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    According to Simon Baron-Cohen, having a male brain disposes a person to be more systematic than empathetic, whereas having a female brain disposes a person to be more empathetic than systematic. However, one can be a male human being with a female brain or a female human being with a male brain. Autistics have an extreme version of the male brain, says Baron-Cohen. In this paper, I present an “a priori” argument against the very idea of an extreme female brain.
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