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Jamie Lewis [5]Jamie B. Lewis [2]
  1.  12
    Hidden in the Middle: Culture, Value and Reward in Bioinformatics.Jamie Lewis, Andrew Bartlett & Paul Atkinson - 2016 - Minerva 54 (4):471-490.
    Bioinformatics – the so-called shotgun marriage between biology and computer science – is an interdiscipline. Despite interdisciplinarity being seen as a virtue, for having the capacity to solve complex problems and foster innovation, it has the potential to place projects and people in anomalous categories. For example, valorised ‘outputs’ in academia are often defined and rewarded by discipline. Bioinformatics, as an interdisciplinary bricolage, incorporates experts from various disciplinary cultures with their own distinct ways of working. Perceived problems of interdisciplinarity include (...)
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  2.  9
    New Challenges, New Vision: Why Social Foundations and Teacher Education Partnerships Matter.Jamie B. Lewis - 2013 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 49 (2):169-182.
    The third edition of the Standards for Academic and Professional Instruction in Foundations of Education, Educational Studies, and Educational Policy Studies (Standards) challenge us to envision what ?a more holistic, inclusive and intellectually challenging approach to preparing educators? might look like. This article discusses how the operating principles of a teacher education program parallel the commitments for educators found in the Standards and explores why collaborative relationships between teacher education and social foundations matter. Given the current political and social climate (...)
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  3.  19
    Legal Challenges to Segregated Education in Topeka, Kansas, 1903-1941.Jamie B. Lewis - 2005 - Educational Studies 37 (1):56-76.
  4.  3
    “A Moment of Science, Please”: Activism, Community, and Humor at the March for Science.Olwenn Martin, Jamie Lewis, Neil Stephens, Photini Vrikki & Hauke Riesch - 2021 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 41 (2-3):46-57.
    In April 2017, scientists and science sympathizers held marches in the United Kingdom as part of a coordinated international March for Science movement that was held in over 600 cities worldwide. This article reports from participant-observation studies of the marches that took place in London and Cardiff. Supplemented with data from 37 interviews from marchers at the London event, the article reports on an analysis of the placards, focusing on marchers’ concerns and the language and images through which they expressed (...)
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  5.  2
    The locus of legitimate interpretation in Big Data sciences: Lessons for computational social science from -omic biology and high-energy physics.Neil Stephens, Luis Reyes-Galindo, Jamie Lewis & Andrew Bartlett - 2018 - Big Data and Society 5 (1).
    This paper argues that analyses of the ways in which Big Data has been enacted in other academic disciplines can provide us with concepts that will help understand the application of Big Data to social questions. We use examples drawn from our Science and Technology Studies analyses of -omic biology and high energy physics to demonstrate the utility of three theoretical concepts: primary and secondary inscriptions, crafted and found data, and the locus of legitimate interpretation. These help us to show (...)
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  6.  1
    Postgraduate Forum on Genetics and Society: Report on the Ninth Colloquium.Andrew Barlett, Jamie Lewis & Ingrid Holme - 2005 - Genomics, Society and Policy 1 (3):82-86.
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