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  1. New products and applications of bamboo. Paper presented during the national symposium on the sustainability of the bamboo industry held at the ERDB Auditorium, College.E. D. Bello & Z. B. Espiloy - forthcoming - Laguna.
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  2. Truth and Ideology in Classical China: Mohists vs Zhuangists.Mercedes Valmisa - 2023 - In Practices of Truth in Philosophy. Historical and Comparative Perspectives. Edited by Pietro Gori and Lorenzo Serini. Routledge. pp. 61-83.
    Mercedes Valmisa turns our attention to the relations between truth and practice in classical Chinese philosophy. In this tradition, truth is conceived of, in a pragmatic-like spirit, as a series of embodied beliefs and perspectives that lead to fitting dispositions, emotions, and actions (regardless of whether they accurately describe the world, or whether there are other competing beliefs and perspectives that equally accurately or inaccurately describe the world). This means that we should care about truth because of its normative power (...)
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  3. Wang Bi and the Hermeneutics of Actualization.Mercedes Valmisa - 2023 - In The Craft of Oblivion. Forgetting and Memory in Ancient China. pp. 245-270.
    This chapter presents an analysis of Wang Bi’s (226-249 CE) hermeneutics and reception theory via the concept of “forgetting” (wang 忘) in his essay “Clarifying the Images” (Ming xiang 明象).
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  4. 卫礼贤与“道”——《中国哲学导论》中“道”的一词多译之探究 [Richard Wilhelm and "Dao": The Five Translations of "Dao" in Chinese Philosophy: An Introduction].David Bartosch & Bei Peng - 2022 - Guowai Shehui Kexue 国外社会科学 Social Sciences Abroad 354 (6):180-188.
    本文通过对德国著名汉学家、翻译家卫礼贤的最后一部哲学论著《中国哲学导 论》(1929)的翻译和研究,整理归纳了卫礼贤对中国哲学的核心词“道”的五种不同译法, 深入剖析了他如何用“一词多译”的方法,对中国哲学史上不同文本、不同哲学家、不同时代 及不同思想维度中的“道”进行诠释。同时,本文以术语学(Terminologie)为研究方法,聚焦 于卫礼贤用来翻译“道”的几个德语哲学术语,并对这些词汇进行溯源。以此为切入点, 本文 分析了卫礼贤作为对中国哲学与德国哲学均有深刻理解的汉学家,有意识地从跨文化比较哲学 的角度出发,将“道”转换为德国哲学中与之相匹配的哲学概念,并将其介绍给德国思想界的 路径。重新审视卫礼贤对“道”的“一词多译”,在加强当今中外文化互鉴和中文著作外译方面 具有积极且重要的作用。[This contribution is based on the translation and study of the book Chinesische Philosophie: Eine Einführung (Chinese Philosophy: An Introduction, 1929). It is the last philosophy-related work by the famous German sinologist and translator Richard Wilhelm. The article provides a compilation, summary, and in-depth analysis concerning Wilhelm's handling of the translation of "Dao", the "Urwort" (Heidegger) of Chinese philosophy. The study provides insight into how Wilhelm has used a poly-perspective method to (...)
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  5. The Soundscape of the Huainanzi 淮南子: Poetry, Performance, Philosophy, and Praxis in Early China.Peter Tsung Kei Wong - 2022 - Early China 45:515-539.
    This article proposes that oral performance could be a philosophical activity in early China. The focus is on the Huainanzi, a densely rhymed philosophical treatise compiled by Liu An in the second century b.c.e. I show that the tome contains various sound-correlated poetic forms that are intended not only to enable textual performance but also, by means of aural mimesis, to encourage the intuitive understanding of its philosophical messages. Thus scholars of ancient poetry, philosophy, or intellectual history, despite being habituated (...)
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  6. El Arte de la Guerra Completo.Alejandro Bárcenas - 2021 - New York: Vintage Español / Penguin Random House.
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  7. What is a Situation?Mercedes Valmisa - 2021 - In Livia Kohn (ed.), Coming to Terms with Timelessness. Daoist Time in Comparative Perspective. Three Pine Press. pp. 26-49.
    This paper leads us in reflections regarding the ontological status of a situation inspired by two main sources: the Zhuangzi--a multifarious compilation from Warring States China (ca. 4th c. BCE)--and José Ortega y Gasset's (1883-1955) Unas Lecciones de Metafísica (Some Lessons in Metaphysics)--the transcripts of a course on metaphysics by a Spanish philosopher of the early 20th century. Much as other ontologically subjective entities and events, situations do not preexist the intentional subject: instead, they are created alongside our act of (...)
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  8. Adapting: A Chinese Philosophy of Action.Mercedes Valmisa - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy of action in the context of Classical China is radically different from its counterpart in the contemporary Western philosophical narrative. Classical Chinese philosophers began from the assumption that relations are primary to the constitution of the person, hence acting in the early Chinese context necessarily is interacting and co-acting along with others –human and nonhuman actors. This book is the first monograph dedicated to the exploration and rigorous reconstruction of an extraordinary strategy for efficacious relational action devised by Classical (...)
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  9. Chinese Landscape Aesthetics: the Exchange and Nurturing of Emotions.Claudia Westermann - 2020 - In Jutta Kehrer (ed.), New Horizons: Eight Perspectives on Chinese Landscape Architecture Today. Basel, Switzerland: pp. 34-37.
    "[..] flowing with the waters, halting with the mountains. In the images of light and wind the ephemeral is inscribed. Time is part of space. The scene performs." -/- The essay "Chinese Landscape Aesthetics: the exchange and nurturing of emotions" by Claudia Westermann included in "New Horizons: Eight Perspectives on Chinese Landscape Architecture Today" introduces ideas of landscape in traditional Chinese thought. Following the etymology of the Chinese terms for landscape and recognizing that their conceptual focus is on the exchange (...)
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  10. Beyond Dualism: A Review of Mind and Body in Early China. [REVIEW]James Daryl Sellmann - 2019 - Journal of World Philosophies 4 (2):166-172.
    This book rightly argues for greater inclusion of the natural and social sciences in the humanities, especially philosophy. The author draws from psychology, especially folk psychology, to show that a basic trait of universal human cognition contains a form of weak dualism. It is a dualism based on the embodied awareness that one’s own thoughts are different from external objects, which generates the belief in a mind/body dualism. The book offers a great deal of evidence that the ancient Chinese embraced (...)
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  11. The Reification of Fate in Early China.Mercedes Valmisa - 2019 - Early China 1 (42):147-199.
    Early Chinese texts make us witnesses to debates about the power, or lack thereof, that humans had over the course of events, the outcomes of their actions, and their own lives. In the midst of these discourses on the limits of the efficacy of human agency, the notion of ming 命 took a central position. In this article, I present a common pattern of thinking about the relationship between the person and the world in early China. I call it the (...)
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  12. Classical Chinese for Everyone: A Guide for Absolute Beginners.Bryan William Van Norden - 2019 - Indianapolis, IN, USA: Hackett Publishing Company.
    In just thirteen brief, accessible chapters, this engaging little book takes "absolute beginners" from the most basic questions about the language (e.g., what does a classical Chinese character look like?) to reading and understanding selections from classical Chinese philosophical texts and Tang dynasty poetry._ " An outstanding introduction to reading classical Chinese_. Van Norden does a wonderful job of clearly explaining the basics of classical Chinese, and he carefully takes the reader through beautifully chosen examples from the textual tradition. An (...)
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  13. Philosophers of the Warring States: A Sourcebook in Chinese Philosophy.Steve Coutinho & Kurtis Hagen (eds.) - 2018 - Peterborough, Canada: Broadview Press.
    An anthology of new translations of essential readings from the classical texts of early Chinese philosophy. It includes the Analects of Confucius, Meng Zi (Mencius), Xun Zi, Mo Zi, Lao Zi (Dao De Jing), Zhuang Zi, and Han Fei Zi, as well as short chapters on the Da Xue and the Zhong Yong. Pedagogically organized, it offers philosophically sophisticated annotations and commentaries as well as an extensive glossary explaining key philosophical concepts in detail.
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  14. Thinking in the Gap between the Cultures of Greece and China.William Franke - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 47:45-49.
    Are there deep differences between these cultures in their ways of thinking? How can they be described? There is no neutral language for doing so. One can doubt all claims to deep essence as being metaphysical illusions and figments. However, the differences are certainly experienced. They can be characterized negatively. This is where Chinese and Western viewpoints meet. Whereas Jullien finds the cultural Other enabling him to think otherwise and effectively to keep the recursive self-negating aspect of discourse active and (...)
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  15. The Philosophical Thought of Wang Chong.Alexus McLeod - 2018 - Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book is a study of the methodological, metaphysical, and epistemological work of the Eastern Han Dynasty period scholar Wang Chong. It presents Wang’s philosophical thought as a unique and syncretic culmination of a number of ideas developed in earlier Han and Warring States philosophy. Wang’s philosophical methodology and his theories of truth, knowledge, and will and determinism offer solutions to a number of problems in the early Chinese tradition. His views also have much to offer contemporary philosophy, suggesting new (...)
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  16. Jane Geaney, Language as Bodily Practice in Early China: A Chinese Grammatology. [REVIEW]Mercedes Valmisa - 2018 - Reading Religion: A Publication of the American Academy of Religion 1.
  17. #MeToo avant la lettre.Paul van Els - 2018 - Filosofie-Tijdschrift 28 (3):35–39.
    van Els, Paul. "#MeToo avant la lettre." Filosofie-Tijdschrift 28, no. 3 (May 2018): 35–39.
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  18. Old Stories No Longer Told: The End of the Anecdotes Tradition of Early China.Paul van Els - 2017 - In Paul van Els & Sarah A. Queen (eds.), Between History and Philosophy: Anecdotes in Early China. Albany, NY, USA: pp. 331–56.
    This chapter analyzes the anecdotes tradition of early China. It contains three parts. Part 1 is a case study of a single anecdote, which serves as a typical example of the thriving anecdotal tradition of early China, from the earliest Chinese narrative histories to the end of the Western Han Dynasty. Part 2 continues the case study by analyzing what happened to that single anecdote in texts from the Eastern Han Dynasty onwards, thereby illustrating the rapid decline of the anecdotes (...)
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  19. Between History and Philosophy: Anecdotes in Early China.Paul van Els & Sarah Ann Queen (eds.) - 2017 - Albany, NY, USA: State University of New York Press.
    Between History and Philosophy is the first book-length study in English to focus on the rhetorical functions and forms of anecdotal narratives in early China. Edited by Paul van Els and Sarah A. Queen, this volume advances the thesis that anecdotes—brief, freestanding accounts of single events involving historical figures, and occasionally also unnamed persons, animals, objects, or abstractions—served as an essential tool of persuasion and meaning-making within larger texts. Contributors to the volume analyze the use of anecdotes from the Warring (...)
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  20. Chinese Perspectives on Free Will.Christian Helmut Wenzel & Marchal Kai - 2017 - In Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith & Neil Levy (eds.), Routledge Companion to Free Will. New York: Routledge. pp. 374-388.
    The problem of free will as it is know in Western philosophical traditions is hardly known in China. Considering how central the problem is in the West, this is a remarkable fact. We try to explain this, and we offer insights into discussions within Chinese traditions that we think are related, not historically but regarding the issues discussed. Thus we introduce four central Chinese concepts, namely: (1) xīn 心 (heart, heart-mind), (2) xìng 性 (human nature, characteristic tendencies, inborn capacity), (3) (...)
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  21. Wang Chong's epistemology of testimony.Esther Klein & Colin Klein - 2016 - Asia Major Third Series 29 (2):115-147.
    In this paper we analyses the work of the first century Chinese philosopher Wang Chong as in part grappling with epistemology of testimony. Often portrayed as a curmudgeonly skeptic, Wang Chong actually best seen as a demanding piecemeal non-reductionist, which is to say he believed that testimony was a basic source of evidence unless subject to a defeater (non-reductionism), but also that we should evaluate testimony on a claim-by-claim basis (piecemeal) rather than accepting a whole source on the strength of (...)
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  22. Collective Wisdom and Civilization: Revitalizing Ancient Wisdom Traditions.Thomas Kiefer - 2015 - Comparative Civilizations Review 72.
    I argue that, in one sense, collective wisdom can save civilization. But in a more important sense, collective wisdom should be understood as a form of civilization, as the result and expression of a moral civilizing-process that comes about through the creation and transmission of collective interpretations of human experience and human nature. Collective wisdom traditions function in this manner by providing an interpretation of what it means to be human and what thoughts, skills, and actions are required to live (...)
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  23. Beyond our Control? Two Responses to Uncertainty and Fate in Early China.Mercedes Valmisa - 2015 - In Livia Kohn (ed.), New Visions of the Zhuangzi. Three Pines Press. pp. 1-22.
    The first contribution, by Mercedes Valmisa, begins by repositioning the Zhuangzi 莊子 as a whole within pre-Qin thought under the impact of newly excavated materials. Moving away from the traditional classification of texts according to schools, it focuses instead on varying approaches to life issues. Centering the discussion on life situations and changes we have no control over, including the unpredictable vagaries of fate (ming 命), it outlines several typical responses. One is adaptation, finding ways to go along with what (...)
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  24. Chinese Philosophy.Paul van Els - 2015 - In Harry Willemsen & Peter de Wind (eds.), Woordenboek filosofie. Apeldoorn, Netherlands: pp. 90–91.
    van Els, Paul. "Chinese filosofie" (Chinese Philosophy). In: Woordenboek filosofie, edited by Harry Willemsen and Peter de Wind, 90–91. Antwerpen & Apeldoorn: Garant, 2015.
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  25. Yin and Yang.Paul van Els - 2015 - In Harry Willemsen & Peter de Wind (eds.), Woordenboek filosofie. Apeldoorn, Netherlands: pp. 617.
    van Els, Paul. "Yin en Yang" (Yin and Yang). In: Woordenboek filosofie (Dictionary of Philosophy), edited by Harry Willemsen and Peter de Wind, 617. Antwerpen & Apeldoorn: Garant, 2015.
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  26. Laughing in Chinese. [REVIEW]Robert Keith Shaw & Guo-Hai Chen - 2014 - Humor 27 (1):167-170.
    Santangelo, Paulo (ed.). 2012.Laughing in Chinese.Rome: Aracne Editrice. 472pp. €26. ISBN 97888 548 46203. This book of 15 papers is divided into four parts: humor in Chinese and Japanese literary works, examples of comic literature, the moral involvement of humor, and the psychology of humor. Santangelo provides a substantial introduction to smiles and laughter in the Chinese context and also to the papers in his book (pp. 5–28). This structure lends itself to a description and analysis of smiling and laughing (...)
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  27. Mortality in Traditional Chinese Thought, Amy Olberding and Philip J. Ivanhoe. [REVIEW]Mathew A. Foust - 2013 - Mortality 18 (3):321-322.
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  28. Righteous, Furious, or Arrogant? On Classifications of Warfare in Early Chinese Texts.Paul van Els - 2013 - In Peter Lorge (ed.), Debating War in Chinese History. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 13–40.
    This chapter studies classifications of warfare in Master Wu, The Four Canons, and Master Wen. In sections one through three, I analyze the classifications in their original contexts. How do they relate to the texts in which they appear? In what way does each classification feed into the overall philosophy of the text? In section four, I compare the three classifications. What are their similarities and differences? In section five, I discuss the possibility of a relationship between the three classifications. (...)
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  29. Zhongtaology: A Confucian Way of Philosophical Thinking and Moral Life.Keqian Xu - 2013 - In School of Philosophy (ed.), XXIII World Congress of Philosophy: Philosophy as Inquiry and Way of Life(Abstract). University of Athens.
    Due to the differences of languages, “ontology” in its original Western sense had not been conceptualized in ancient China. The most prominent and unique feature of Confucian philosophy in early ancient China is “Zhongtaology” instead of “ontology”. Zhongtaology is the philosophical inquiring for the way of “Zhong”, which is based on all the primordially related semantic meanings embodied in the Chinese character “zhong”. Zhongtaological philosophy indicates an association between human beings and their world, a coincidence between subjectivity and objectivity, a (...)
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  30. Zhong 中 and Ideal Rulership in the Baoxun 保訓 (Instructions for Preservation) Text of the Tsinghua Collection of Bamboo Slip Manuscripts.Shirley Chan - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):129-145.
    Zhong 中 is an important notion in early Chinese thought. This essay offers a brief survey of the possible connotations of zhong found in the Baoxun 保訓 text of the Tsinghua University’s Collection of bamboo manuscripts of the Warring States period. By making a preliminary textual analysis and philosophical interpretation of the concept of zhong in relation to ideal rulership as presented in this newly discovered ancient text it is hoped that it will shed some light on the continuing debate (...)
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  31. Friendship and Filial Piety: Relational Ethics in Aristotle and Early Confucianism.Tim Connolly - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):71-88.
    This article examines the origins of and philosophical justifications for Aristotelian friendship and early Confucian filial piety.What underlying assumptions about bonds between friends and family members do the philosophies share or uniquely possess? Is the Aristotelian emphasis on relationships between equals incompatible with the Confucian regard for filiality? As I argue, the Aristotelian and early Confucian accounts, while different in focus, share many of the same tensions in the attempt to balance hierarchical and familial associations with those between friends who (...)
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  32. Shizi: China’s First Syncretist.Paul Fischer - 2012 - Columbia University Press.
    By blending multiple strands of thought into one ideology, Chinese Syncretists of the pre-imperial period created an essential guide to contemporary ideas about self, society, and government. Merging traditions such as Ruism, Mohism, Daoism, Legalism, and Yin-Yang naturalism into their work, Syncretists created an integrated intellectual approach that contrasts with other, more specific philosophies. Presenting the first full English translation of the earliest example of a Syncretist text, this volume introduces Western scholars to both the brilliance of the syncretic method (...)
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  33. The art of war corpus and chinese just war ethics past and present.Ping-Cheung Lo - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):404-446.
    The idea of “just war” is not alien to Chinese thought. The term “yi zhan” (usually translated as “just war” or “righteous war” in English) is used in Mencius, was renewed by Mao Zedong, and is still being used in China today (zhengyi zhanzheng). The best place to start exploring this Chinese idea is in the enormous Art of War corpus in premodern China, of which the Seven Military Classics is the best representative. This set of treatises served as the (...)
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  34. Individualism in Early China: Human Agency and the Self in Thought and Politics by Erica Fox Brindley. [REVIEW]Hagop Sarkissian - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):408-410.
    Review of Individualism in Early China: Human Agency and the Self in Thought and Politics by Erica Fox Brindley.
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  35. Guodian: The Newly Discovered Seeds of Chinese Religious and Political Philosophy (review).Kirill O. Thompson - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (2):311-316.
  36. Political Rhetoric in Early China.Paul van Els & Elisa Sabattini - 2012 - Extrême-Orient Extrême-Occident 34:5–14.
    Early Chinese thought enjoys a wide appeal, in the scholarly world as much as elsewhere, as people are keen on learning about the ideas of Confucius, Mencius, and other thinkers whose views have shaped traditional Chinese culture. In the study of early Chinese thought, emphasis has long been on what thinkers said, not on how they proffered their views. Even studies that do consider the how, tend to focus on logic and argumentation, rather than rhetoric. Fortunately, in the past few (...)
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  37. 中国古代先哲的时空观研究 Study of Time-Space for Ancient Chinese Philosophers.辉 熊 - 2012 - Advances in Philosophy 1 (2):5-8.
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  38. Interpretations of virtue (de) in early china.Alan K. L. Chan - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):134-150.
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  39. Knowledge and Error in Early Chinese Thought.Chris Fraser - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):127-148.
    Drawing primarily on the Mòzǐ and Xúnzǐ, the article proposes an account of how knowledge and error are understood in classical Chinese epistemology and applies it to explain the absence of a skeptical argument from illusion in early Chinese thought. Arguments from illusion are associated with a representational conception of mind and knowledge, which allows the possibility of a comprehensive or persistent gap between appearance and reality. By contrast, early Chinese thinkers understand mind and knowledge primarily in terms of competence (...)
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  40. Self as Container? Metaphors We Lose By in Understanding Early China.Jane Geaney - 2011 - Antiquorum Philosophia 5:11-30.
    As part of a trend in modern cognitive science, cognitive linguist, George Lakoff, and philosopher, Mark Johnson claim to provide a biologically-based account of subsymbolic meaningful experiences. They argue that human beings understand objects by extrapolating from their sensory motor activities and primary perceptions. Lakoff and Johnson’s writings have generated a good deal of interest among scholars of Early China because they maintain that “our common embodiment allows for common stable truths.” Although there are many grounds on which Lakoff and (...)
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  41. Abstract Concept Formation in Archaic Chinese Script Forms: Some Humboldtian Perspectives.Kwan 關子尹 Tze-Wan - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (3):409-452.
    Starting from the Humboldtian characterization of Chinese writing as a "script of thoughts," this article makes an attempt to show that notwithstanding the important role played by phonetic elements, the Chinese script also relies on visual-graphical means in its constitution of meaning. In point of structure, Chinese characters are made up predominantly of components that are sensible or even tangible in nature. Out of these sensible components, not only physical objects or empirical states of affairs can be expressed, but also (...)
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  42. Van Norden, Bryan, Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy: Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 2011, xvii+271 Pages.Alexus McLeod - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):567-570.
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  43. Benti, practice and state: On the doctrine of mind in the four chapters of Guanzi. [REVIEW]Peng Peng - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):549-564.
    “ Xin 心 (Mind)” is one of the key concepts in the four chapters of Guanzi . Together with Dao, qi 气 (air, or gas) and de 德 (virtue), the four concepts constitute a complete system of the learning of mind which is composed of the theory of benti 本体 (root and body), the theory of practice and the theory of spiritual state. Guanzi differentiates the two basic layers of mind—the essence and the function. It tries to attain a state (...)
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  44. Rosemont, Jr., Henry, and Roger T. Ames, The Chinese Classic of Family Reverence: A Philosophical Translation of the Xiaojing: Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 2009, Xv + 132 Pages. [REVIEW]Thomas Radice - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):259-262.
    Rosemont, Jr., Henry, and Roger T. Ames, The Chinese Classic of Family Reverence: A Philosophical Translation of the Xiaojing Content Type Journal Article Pages 259-262 DOI 10.1007/s11712-011-9215-4 Authors Thomas Radice, Department of History, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT 06515, USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 10 Journal Issue Volume 10, Number 2.
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  45. Individualism in Early China: Human Agency and the Self in Thought and Politics – By Erica Fox Brindley.Jeffrey L. Richey - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):495-498.
  46. The Warring States Concept of Xing.Dan Robins - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):31-51.
    This essay defends a novel interpretation of the term xìng 性 as it occurs in Chinese texts of the late Warring States period (roughly 320–221 BCE). The term played an important role both in the famous controversy over the goodness or badness of people’s xìng and elsewhere in the intellectual discourse of the period. Extending especially the work of A.C. Graham, the essay stresses the importance for understanding xìng of early Chinese assumptions about spontaneity, continuity, health, and (in the human (...)
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  47. The yijing: Metaphysics and physics.Andreas Schöter - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):412-426.
  48. Introduction to classical Chinese philosophy.Bryan W. Van Norden - 2011 - Indianapolis: Hackett.
    ■ ■ 1 the historical context I am not of their age or time and so have not personally heard their voices or seen their faces, but I know this by what is ...
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  49. Semantic Criticism: The “Westernization” of the Concepts in Ancient Chinese Philosophy—A Discussion of Yan Fu’s Theory of Qi.Zhenyu Zeng - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):100-113.
    Every philosophical mode has a unique conceptual system. Qi has consistently been a fundamental part of ancient Chinese philosophy, and its significance is obvious. Guided by the idea of re-evaluating all values, Yan Fu, who was deeply influenced by Western philosophy and logic, used reverse analogical interpretation to present a new explanation of the traditional Chinese concept of qi. Qi thus evolved into basic physical particles. Yan’s philosophical effort has great significance: The logical ambiguity that had haunted qi was overcome. (...)
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  50. Abdication and utopian vision in the bamboo slip manuscript, rongchengshi.Sarah Allan - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):67-84.
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