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  1. Dao as You? Dropping Proper Parthood in a Mereological Reconstruction of Daoist Metaphysics.Rafal Banka - 2022 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 49 (1):97-105.
    In this article, I discuss parthood status in mereologi- cally interpreted Daoist metaphysics, based on the Daodejing. I depart from the dao and you interrela- tion, which mereologically overlap by sharing parts. I consider the case of a complete overlap, which (a) challenges proper parthood, according to which a part cannot be identical with the whole that it com- poses, and (b) entails the question of identity that, while complying with classical mereology, cannot be consis- tent with Daoist metaphysics. The (...)
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  2. Turner as a Daoist Sage.Jason Dockstader - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 7 (2):113-127.
    In this paper, I provide a cross-cultural comparison between the life and work of the English land- and seascape painter, J.M.W. Turner, and the conception of aesthetic experience and artisanship f...
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  3. On Laozi's Body Philosophy from the Perspective of Perceptual Existence.Weijia Zeng & Dawei Zhang - 2021 - Journal of Laozi Studies 18 (2):3-12.
    From the perspective of perceptual ontology, Laozi criticizes the unnatural state in which the body is concealed in the perceptual social power and ethical relations, and advocates the perceptual liberation of the body. According to different subjects of the body, the covered body should be divided into people’s body and monarchs’ body. The body of the people is concealed in the rites and music, and could be liberated by resuming production; the body of the monarchs is covered in the excessive (...)
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  4. Intertextuality and the Dao that Unifies Being and Nothing - Intertextual Rhetoric in Laozi’s Dao De Jing.Dawei Zhang - 2021 - Journal of Zhoukou Normal University 38 (6):60-66.
    Intertextuality (mutual illustration) is a common rhetorical device in ancient Chinese and has been used many times in Laozi (Dao Dejing). Intertextuality (mutual illustration) is of unique significance for understanding the linguistic structure and philosophical thoughts of Lao-zi. According to the current research on mutual illustration rhetoric on ancient Chinese, the forms of this rhetoric in Laozi can be divided into mutual illustration of single sentence, of multiple sentences and of ellipsis and antisense. There are only two references to mutual (...)
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  5. Trans-Cultural Journeys of East-Asian Educators: The Impact of the Three Teachings.Nguyen Hoang Giang-Le, Chieh-Tai Hsiao & Youmi Heo - 2020 - International Journal for Cross-Disciplinary Subjects in Education 11 (1):4201-4210.
    This paper presents the joint journeys, from the East to the West, of three emerging educators, who reflect on their lived experiences in an Asian educational context and their shaped identities through a connection between the motherland and the places to which they immigrated. They have grounded their identities in the inequities they experienced in Asian education and described their experiences through a cultural and social lens as Asian teachers studying in Canadian institutions. They story their lived experiences by using (...)
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  6. Rules of Composition: A Mereological Examination of the Dao-You Relation.Rafał Banka - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 68 (4):1025-1041.
    This article proposes a mereological approach to the dao-you relation in the Daodejing. It is claimed here that dao and you can be conceived of as two integrated subregions, defined in terms of rules of composition and their persistence through time. It is shown that dao is an atemporal object (a fourdimensional unrestricted composition), whereas you is a temporal object (a three-dimensional restricted composition). This particular approach can provide a new understanding of essential issues in Daoist metaphysics.
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  7. Tao Te Ching.Alejandro Bárcenas - 2019 - New York, NY, USA: Knopf / Vintage Español.
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  8. Weiziran (為自然) and Aloha ʻĀina: Place, Identity and Ethics of the Environment.Andrew Soh - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Hawaii
    “人法地,地法天,天法道,道法自然。”—Daodejing 25 “Ua mau ke ea o ka ‘āina i ka pono.” —Hawaiʻi State Motto Our home, planet Earth, is under threat from a host of environmental problems: global climate change, loss of biodiversity, and pollution of the air and waterways from industries. The reality of climate change affects all of us—it affects habitats and entire ecosystems, and raises other risks such as health and security risks, as well as food production risks. The Fifth Assessment Report from the Intergovernmental Panel (...)
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  9. Dao and Sign in History: Daoist Arche-Semiotics in Ancient and Medieval China.Daniel Fried - 2018 - Albany: SUNY.
    From its earliest origins in the Dao De Jing, Daoism has been known as a movement that is skeptical of the ability of language to fully express the truth. While many scholars have compared the earliest works of Daoism to language-skeptical movements in twentieth-century European philosophy and have debated to what degree early Daoism does or does not resemble these recent movements, Daniel Fried breaks new ground by examining a much broader array of Daoist materials from ancient and medieval China (...)
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  10. Can a Daoist Sage Have Close Relationships with Other Human Beings?Joanna Iwanowska - 2017 - Diametros 52:23-46.
    This paper explores the compatibility between the Daoist art of emptying one’s heart-mind and the art of creating close relationships. The fact that a Daoist sage is characterized by an empty heart-mind makes him somewhat different from an average human being: since a full heart-mind is characteristic of the human condition, the sage transcends what makes us human. This could alienate him from others and make him incapable of developing close relationships. The research goal of this paper is to investigate (...)
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  11. Lao Tzu's Ethics: Taoism (Ethics-1, M35).Shyam Ranganathan - 2016 - In A. Raghuramaraju (ed.), Philosophy, E-PG Pathshala. Delhi: India, Department of Higher Education (NMEICT).
    This module is a review of the guiding ideas of Lao Tzu’s ethics of wu wei and the Tao, an account of Lao Tzu’s prioritisation of the feminine as a basic moral principle, the problem of masculinity for practical rationality, his criticism of language, doctrines and oppressive politics. Finally, we shall evaluate the moral import of Lao Tzu’s teachings, and close with some reflections on the synergy between Taoist and Madhyamaka Buddhist thought, which rendered the latter so easily received in (...)
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  12. Fortune and the Dao: A Comparative Study of Machiavelli, the Daodejing, and the Han Feizi.Jason P. Blahuta - 2015 - Lexington Books.
    Times of prolonged conflict spur great minds to seek a lasting peace. Thus was the case of Warring States China, which saw the rise of the Hundred Schools of Thought, including the Doadejing and the Han Feizi, and Renaissance Italy, which produced Niccolò Machiavelli. Witnessing their respective societies fall prey to internal corruption and external aggression, all three thinkers sought ways to produce a strong, stable state that would allow both the leader and the populace to endure. Fortune and the (...)
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  13. Critical Analysis of the Philosophical Conception of Verification of Being/the Self in Heidegger's “Being and Time” Against Dao/the Other in Laozi's Daodejing.Lucian Green - 2015 - Best Thinking.
    That dao and being are correct as written about by Laozi and Heidegger respectively is exposed through eight perspectives.
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  14. Nature, Mystery, and Morality: A Daoist View.Ian James Kidd - 2015 - Religious Studies 51 (2):165-181.
    This paper argues that a sense of nature‘s mystery can inspire and inform ways of experiencing and engaging with natural places and creatures in a way that is deeply morally transformative. Focusing on Daoism, it is argued that engagement with natural places and creates can facilitate the cultivation of receptivity to a sense of nature‘s mystery in a way that gradually releases a person from stances and conceptions that are morally and ecologically objectionable. The paper closes by suggesting that a (...)
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  15. Ecstatic Language of Early Daoism: A Sufi Point of View.Esmaeil Radpour - 2015 - Transcendent Philosophy Journal 16:213-230.
    Various esoteric traditions apply different modes of expression for the same metaphysical truths. We may name the two most known esoteric languages as ecstatic and scholastic. Early Daoist use of reverse symbolism as for metaphysical truths and its critical way of viewing formalist understanding of traditional teachings, common virtues and popular beliefs show that it applies an ecstatic language, which, being called shaṭḥ in Sufi terminology, has a detailed literature and technical description in Sufism. This article tries, after a short (...)
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  16. Well-Being and Daoism.Justin Tiwald - 2015 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-Being. Routledge. pp. 56-69.
    In this chapter, I explicate several general views and arguments that bear on the notion and contemporary theories of human welfare, as found in two foundational Daoist texts, the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi. Ideas drawn from the Daodejing include its objections to desire theories of human welfare and its distinction between natural and acquired desires. Insights drawn from the Zhuangzi include its arguments against the view that death is bad for the dead, its attempt to develop a workable theory of (...)
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  17. Meontological Generativity: A Daoist Reading of the Thing.David Chai - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (2):303-318.
    This paper relocates the philosophical discourse on the Thing (das Ding) to the world of classical Daoism. In doing so, it explores the bond between the One, the Thing and its signifier before discussing how the Thing unveils itself to the world while receiving the gift of nothingness from Dao. It furthermore contends that the two most prominent discussions of the Thing in the Western tradition--those by Heidegger and Lacan--while philosophically valuable in their own right, fail to provide the degree (...)
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  18. A Daoist Model For A Kantian Church.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):67-89.
    Although significant differences undoubtedly exist between Daoism and Kant’s philosophy, the two systems also have some noteworthy similarities. After calling attention to a few such parallels and sketching the outlines of Kant’s philosophy of religion, this article focuses on an often-neglected feature of the latter: the four guiding principles of what Kant calls an “invisible church”. Numerous passages from Lao Zi’s classic text, Dao-De-Jing, seem to uphold these same principles, thus suggesting that they can also be interpreted as core features (...)
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  19. What’s in a Dao?: Ontology and Semiotics in Laozi and Zhuangzi.Daniel Fried - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (4):419-436.
    The present essay examines the conflicting ontological assumptions that one can find behind the word dao in the texts of the Laozi and Zhuangzi and argues that the relative indifference to these texts toward whether or not dao has an ontic reality should not be considered a flaw of early Daoism. Rather, the historical process by which the term dao collects various possible ontological implications can be thought of as a philosophical stance in its own right. That is, if the (...)
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  20. Inference in the Mengzi 1a: 7.Koji Tanaka - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):444-454.
    In 1A:7 of the Mengzi, Mengzi tries to convince King Xuan of Qi that he is a “true” king. As a reading of Mengzi’s reasoning involved in his attempt at persuasion, David Nivison advances an inferential view, according to which Mengzi’s persuasion involves inferences. In this paper, I consider the assumptions underlying the objections raised against Nivison’s inferential view. I argue that these objections assume a contemporary Western view about the nature of logic and inferences. I propose an alternative characterisation (...)
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  21. A Dao of Technology?Barry Allen - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):151-160.
    Scholars have detected hostility to technology in Daoist thought. But is this a problem with any machine or only some applications of some machines by some people? I show that the problem is not with machines per se but with the people who introduce them, or more exactly with their knowledge. It is not knowledge as such that causes the disorder Laozi and Zhuangzi associate with machines; it is confused, disordered knowledge—superficial, inadequate, unsubtle, and artless. In other words the problem (...)
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  22. The Guodian Bamboo Slips and Confucian Theories of Human Nature.Lai Chen - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):33-50.
  23. Writing an Empire: Cross-Talk on Authority, Act, and Relationships with the Other in the Analects, Daodejing, and HanFeizi.Arabella Lyon - 2010 - College English 70 (4):350-366.
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  24. Typology of Nothing: Heidegger, Daoism and Buddhism.Zhihua Yao - 2010 - Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):78-89.
    Parmenides expelled nonbeing from the realm of knowledge and forbade us to think or talk about it. But still there has been a long tradition of nay-sayings throughout the history of Western and Eastern philosophy. Are those philosophers talking about the same nonbeing or nothing? If not, how do their concepts of nothing differ from each other? Could there be different types of nothing? Surveying the traditional classifications of nothing or nonbeing in the East and West have led me to (...)
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  25. The Philosophy of Tai Chi Chuan: Wisdom From Confucius, Lao Tzu, and Other Great Thinkers.Freya Boedicker - 2009 - Blue Snake Books.
    Each chapter of this concise volume focuses on a single work or philosopher, and includes a short history of each one as well as a description of their ...
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  26. Dao Legislates for Humans Vs. Humans Legislate for Themselves : A Comparison of Laozi's and Confucius' Conceptions of Dao.Deron Chen - 2009 - In Jinfen Yan & David E. Schrader (eds.), Creating a Global Dialogue on Value Inquiry: Papers From the Xxii Congress of Philosophy (Rethinking Philosophy Today). Edwin Mellen Press.
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  27. Knowing Through the Body: The Daodejing and Dewey.Joel W. Krueger - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):31-52.
  28. A Daoist Critique of Searle on Mind and Action.Joel Krueger - 2008 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Searle’s Philosophy and Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement. Brill Academic Publishers. pp. 97-123.
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  29. Wittgenstein, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu: The Art of Circumlocution.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (1):97 – 108.
    Where Western philosophy ends, with the limits of language, marks the beginning of Eastern philosophy. The Tao de jing of Laozi begins with the limitations of language and then proceeds from that as a starting point. On the other hand, the limitation of language marks the end of Wittgenstein's cogitations. In contrast to Wittgenstein, who thought that one should remain silent about that which cannot be put into words, the message of the Zhuangzi is that one can speak about that (...)
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  30. The Laozi Code.Phan Chánh Công - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (3):239-262.
    The term “dao” (道) has been playing the theoretically paradigmatic role in almost all East Asian philosophies, religions, and cultures. The meanings of the term “dao” in the Dao De Jing and other ancient East Asian texts have remained hermeneutically problematic up to this point in time. This article argues that one of the main causes of this hermeneutical problematic is the failure to establish a theoretically formal typology of the “dao.” It further suggests that a hermeneutically disciplined reading of (...)
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  31. Ziran and Wuwei in the Daodejing : An Ethical Assessment.Karyn Lai - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):325-337.
    In Daoist philosophy, the self is understood as an individual interdependent with others, and situated within a broader environment. Within this framework, the concept ziran is frequently understood in terms of naturalness or nature while wuwei is explained in terms of non-oppressive government. In many existing accounts, little is done to connect these two key Daoist concepts. Here, I suggest that wuwei and ziran are correlated, ethical, concepts. Together, they provide a unifying ethical framework for understanding the philosophy of the (...)
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  32. Learning From Chinese Philosophies.Karyn Lai - 2006 - Taylor and Francis.
    Learning from Chinese Philosophies engages Confucian and Daoist philosophies in creative interplay, developing a theory of interdependent selfhood in the two philosophical traditions. Karyn Lai draws on the unique insights of the two philosophies to address contemporary debates on ethics, community and government. Issues discussed include questions on selfhood, attachment, moral development, government, culture and tradition, and feminist queries regarding biases and dualism in ethics. Throughout the book, Lai demonstrates that Chinese philosophies embody novel and insightful ideas for addressing contemporary (...)
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  33. The Daodejing of Laozi. Translation and Commentary by Philip J. Ivanhoe. (New York and London: Seven Bridges Press, 2002. 125 Pp. + Xxxii.)/ Dao De Jing: The Book of the Way. Translation and Commentary by Moss Roberts.Steven Shankman - 2006 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):303–308.
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  34. Conceptual Foundations for Environmental Ethics: A Daoist Perspective.Karyn Lai - 2003 - Environmental Ethics 25 (3):247-266.
    The concepts dao and de in the Daodejing may be evoked to support a distinctive and plausible account of environmental holism. Dao refers to the totality of particulars, including the relations that hold between them, and the respective roles and functions of each within the whole. De refers to the distinctiveness of each particular, realized meaningfully only within the context of its interdependence with others, and its situatedness within the whole. Together, dao and de provide support for an ethical holism (...)
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  35. The Abduction of Vagueness: Interpreting The.Steve Coutinho - 2002 - Philosophy East and West 52 (4):409-425.
    : The role of vagueness in the Laozi is explored by investigating its connection with "process." First, a hermeneutic methodology is developed and adopted, derived from Peirce's notion of "abduction." Second, this notion is analyzed, and several distinctive characteristics, or "traces," of vagueness are identified. Third, evidence of these traces in the text of the Laozi is collected, with comments on their significance in the Daoist context.
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  36. Complementarity as a Model for East-West Integrative Philosophy.Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (4):505-517.
    The discovery of a letter in the Niels Bohr archives written by Bohr to a Danish schoolteacher in which he reveals his early knowledge of the Daodejing led the present author on a search to unveil the influence of the philosophy of Yin-Yang on Bohr's famed complementarity principle in Western physics. This paper recounts interviews with his son, Hans, who recalls Bohr reading a translated copy of Laozi, as well as Hanna Rosental, close friend and associate who also confirms the (...)
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  37. Moral Values and the Daoist Sage in the Dao Dejing.Robert E. Allinson - 1996 - In Brian Carr (ed.), Morals and Society in Asian Philosophy. Curzon. pp. 1--156.
    The theme of this paper is that while there are four seemingly contradictory classes of statements in the Dao de Jing regarding moral values and the Daoist sage, these statements can be interpreted to be consistent with each other. There are statements which seemingly state or imply that nothing at all can be said about the Dao; there are statements which seemingly state or imply that all value judgements are relative; there are statements which appear to attribute moral behaviour to (...)
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  38. Self Reflecting Nature: An East/West Dialogue on Ecofeminism.Mary Ann Trotter Sellars - 1995 - Dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
    The subject of this dissertation is one that is central to many current philosophical debates in ecological thought: the character of the relationship of nature to human culture. I will engage that debate on a somewhat more specific level by focusing on the debate within ecological feminism, often called ecofeminism, concerning the identification of women with nature and men with culture. The difficulties inherent of either accepting or denying these identifications will be traced through the various perspectives of ecofeminist thought. (...)
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  39. Moral Values and the Taoist Sage in the Tao de Ching.Robert E. Allinson - 1994 - Asian Philosophy 4 (2):127 – 136.
    The theme of this paper is that while there are four seemingly contradictory classes of statements in the Tao de Ching regarding moral values and the Taoist sage, these statements can be interpreted to be consistent with each other. There are statements which seemingly state or imply that nothing at all can be said about the Tao; there are statements which seemingly state or imply that all value judgements are relative; there are statements which appear to attribute moral behaviour to (...)
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  40. On Reading the Tao Te Ching: Mair, Lafargue, Chan. [REVIEW]Kuang-Ming Wu - 1993 - Philosophy East and West 43 (4):745.
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  41. Ineffability in the Laotzu: The Taming of a Dragon.Dennis M. Ahern - 1977 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (4):357-382.
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  42. The Origin and Development of Being (Yu) From Non-Being (Wu) in the Tao Te Ching.Ellen Marie Chen - 1973 - International Philosophical Quarterly 13 (3):403-417.
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  43. Radical Currents in Contemporary Philosophy.David H. Degrood, Dale Maurice Riepe & John Somerville - 1971 - W.H. Green.
    Critique of idealistic naturalism: methodological pollution in the main stream of American philosophy, by D. Riepe.--Ex nihilo nihil fit: philosophy's "starting point," by D. H. DeGrood.--An historical critique of empiricism, by J. E. Hansen.--Epilogue on Berkeley, by R. W. Sellars.--Mandala thinking, by A. Mackay.--An empirical conception of freedom, by E. D'Angelo.--Heidegger on the essence of truth, by M. Farber.--Minding as a material force, by H. L. Parsons.--The crisis of the 1890's and the shaping of twentieth century America, by R. B. (...)
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  44. Critical Analysis of the Philosophical Conception of Dao in Laozi's Daodejing and Being in Heidegger's “Being and Time”.Lucian Green - manuscript
    That dao and being are correct as written about by Laozi and Heidegger respectively is exposed through eight focal points.
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