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  1. Laozi Through the Lens of the White Rose: Resonance or Dissonance?Lea Cantor - 2023 - Oxford German Studies 52 (1):62-79.
    A surprising feature of the White Rose anti-Nazi resistance pamphlets is their appeal to a foundational classical Chinese text, the Laozi (otherwise known as the Daodejing), to buttress their critique of fascism and authoritarianism. I argue that from the perspective of a 1942 educated readership, the act of quoting the Laozi functioned as a subtle and pointed nod to anti-fascist intellectuals in pre-war Germany, many of whom had interpreted the Laozi as an anti-authoritarian and pacifist text. To a sympathetic reader, (...)
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  2. Dao as You? Dropping Proper Parthood in a Mereological Reconstruction of Daoist Metaphysics.Rafal Banka - 2022 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 49 (1):97-105.
    In this article, I discuss parthood status in mereologi- cally interpreted Daoist metaphysics, based on the Daodejing. I depart from the dao and you interrela- tion, which mereologically overlap by sharing parts. I consider the case of a complete overlap, which (a) challenges proper parthood, according to which a part cannot be identical with the whole that it com- poses, and (b) entails the question of identity that, while complying with classical mereology, cannot be consis- tent with Daoist metaphysics. The (...)
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  3. Deconstruction and Nothingness: Deliberation, Daoism, and Derrida on Decision.Paul Patton - 2022 - Kritike 16 (1):1-21.
    This article traces a connection between the Daoist conception of nothingness and democratic deliberation by way of Derrida’s deconstructive analysis of decision. A widespread understanding of deliberation relies on the idea that the force of argument should be the sole determinant of individual and collective views. It follows that deliberation is genuine only if participants can change their views as a result of reasoned argument, that is to say only if there is the possibility of a decision. Analysis of the (...)
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  4. The Soundscape of the Huainanzi 淮南子: Poetry, Performance, Philosophy, and Praxis in Early China.Peter Tsung Kei Wong - 2022 - Early China 45:515-539.
    This article proposes that oral performance could be a philosophical activity in early China. The focus is on the Huainanzi, a densely rhymed philosophical treatise compiled by Liu An in the second century b.c.e. I show that the tome contains various sound-correlated poetic forms that are intended not only to enable textual performance but also, by means of aural mimesis, to encourage the intuitive understanding of its philosophical messages. Thus scholars of ancient poetry, philosophy, or intellectual history, despite being habituated (...)
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  5. Understanding Dao in Methodological Terms.Xinkan Zhao - 2022 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 21 (2):197-211.
    The notion of dao 道 in the Daodejing 道德經 typically receives either a metaphysical interpretation or a practical one. In this essay, I survey a series of recent interpretations and show that given the gap between the two dimensions, the extant interpretations typically have the problem of attributing ambiguity to the central notion of dao, whether explicitly or implicitly. In light of this, I venture a novel reading according to which the text is interpreted also in practical terms, more specifically (...)
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  6. Over of Two: An Analysis of the Epistemology of Laozi. 吴化文 - 2022 - Advances in Philosophy 11 (5):1395.
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  7. On Laozi's Body Philosophy from the Perspective of Perceptual Existence.Weijia Zeng & Dawei Zhang - 2021 - Journal of Laozi Studies 18 (2):3-12.
    From the perspective of perceptual ontology, Laozi criticizes the unnatural state in which the body is concealed in the perceptual social power and ethical relations, and advocates the perceptual liberation of the body. According to different subjects of the body, the covered body should be divided into people’s body and monarchs’ body. The body of the people is concealed in the rites and music, and could be liberated by resuming production; the body of the monarchs is covered in the excessive (...)
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  8. On the Paradox of Wuwei - A Refutation and Defense of Daoist "Right Action".Dawei Zhang - 2021 - Philosophical Trends 202107 (7):115-125.
    Wuwei (nonaction) is one of the core concepts of Daoist ethics. Edward Slingerland pointed out that wuwei involves a paradox, and Arthur C. Danto questioned whether wuwei could support a genuine moral theory and the idea of right action. To defend Daoist ethics and its concept of right action, it is necessary to envisage Danto’s criticism and the problems raised by Slingerland. According to Ivanhoe, Wuwei is not a paradox, but a riddle or mystery about self-cultivation. He thinks that if (...)
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  9. Intertextuality and the Dao that Unifies Being and Nothing - Intertextual Rhetoric in Laozi’s Dao De Jing.Dawei Zhang - 2021 - Journal of Zhoukou Normal University 38 (6):60-66.
    Intertextuality (mutual illustration) is a common rhetorical device in ancient Chinese and has been used many times in Laozi (Dao Dejing). Intertextuality (mutual illustration) is of unique significance for understanding the linguistic structure and philosophical thoughts of Lao-zi. According to the current research on mutual illustration rhetoric on ancient Chinese, the forms of this rhetoric in Laozi can be divided into mutual illustration of single sentence, of multiple sentences and of ellipsis and antisense. There are only two references to mutual (...)
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  10. Methods of Doing Daoist Ethics: Analysis, Interpretation and Comparison.Dawei Zhang & Weijia Zeng - 2021 - Social Sciences in Yunnan 240 (2):69-76.
    In order to have an effective and reliable understanding of the basic moral concepts, moral propositions and moral reasoning in Daoist ethical thoughts, it is necessary to use the methods of doing philosophy and doing ethics to engage in research work, and thus draw an intellectual conclusion about Daoist ethics. The methods of Daoist ethics mainly include analysis, explanation and comparison. The method of analysis focuses on logical analysis and language analysis of moral language in the classic texts of Daoist (...)
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  11. Turner as a Daoist Sage.Jason Dockstader - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 7 (2):113-127.
    In this paper, I provide a cross-cultural comparison between the life and work of the English land- and seascape painter, J.M.W. Turner, and the conception of aesthetic experience and artisanship f...
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  12. Trans-Cultural Journeys of East-Asian Educators: The Impact of the Three Teachings.Nguyen Hoang Giang-Le, Chieh-Tai Hsiao & Youmi Heo - 2020 - International Journal for Cross-Disciplinary Subjects in Education 11 (1):4201-4210.
    This paper presents the joint journeys, from the East to the West, of three emerging educators, who reflect on their lived experiences in an Asian educational context and their shaped identities through a connection between the motherland and the places to which they immigrated. They have grounded their identities in the inequities they experienced in Asian education and described their experiences through a cultural and social lens as Asian teachers studying in Canadian institutions. They story their lived experiences by using (...)
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  13. Rules of Composition: A Mereological Examination of the Dao-You Relation.Rafał Banka - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 68 (4):1025-1041.
    This article proposes a mereological approach to the dao-you relation in the Daodejing. It is claimed here that dao and you can be conceived of as two integrated subregions, defined in terms of rules of composition and their persistence through time. It is shown that dao is an atemporal object (a fourdimensional unrestricted composition), whereas you is a temporal object (a three-dimensional restricted composition). This particular approach can provide a new understanding of essential issues in Daoist metaphysics.
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  14. Tao Te Ching.Alejandro Bárcenas - 2019 - New York, NY, USA: Knopf / Vintage Español.
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  15. Weiziran (為自然) and Aloha ʻĀina: Place, Identity and Ethics of the Environment.Andrew Soh - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Hawaii
    “人法地,地法天,天法道,道法自然。”—Daodejing 25 “Ua mau ke ea o ka ‘āina i ka pono.” —Hawaiʻi State Motto Our home, planet Earth, is under threat from a host of environmental problems: global climate change, loss of biodiversity, and pollution of the air and waterways from industries. The reality of climate change affects all of us—it affects habitats and entire ecosystems, and raises other risks such as health and security risks, as well as food production risks. The Fifth Assessment Report from the Intergovernmental Panel (...)
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  16. A History of Classical Chinese Thought.Li Zehou & Andrew Lambert - 2019 - New York, New York: Routledge. Edited by Andrew Lambert.
    Translated, with a philosophical introduction.
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  17. Dao and Sign in History: Daoist Arche-Semiotics in Ancient and Medieval China.Daniel Fried - 2018 - Albany: SUNY.
    From its earliest origins in the Dao De Jing, Daoism has been known as a movement that is skeptical of the ability of language to fully express the truth. While many scholars have compared the earliest works of Daoism to language-skeptical movements in twentieth-century European philosophy and have debated to what degree early Daoism does or does not resemble these recent movements, Daniel Fried breaks new ground by examining a much broader array of Daoist materials from ancient and medieval China (...)
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  18. Interpreting Dao (道) between ‘Way-making’ and ‘Be-wëgen’.Massimiliano Lacertosa - 2018 - In Gregory Bracken (ed.), Ancient and Modern Practices of Citizenship in Asia and the West: Care of the Self. Amsterdam University Press. pp. 103-120.
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  19. An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy (2nd ed.).Karyn Lai - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    This comprehensive introductory textbook to early Chinese philosophy covers a range of philosophical traditions which arose during the Spring and Autumn and Warring States periods in China, including Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism. It considers concepts, themes and argumentative methods of early Chinese philosophy and follows the development of some ideas in subsequent periods, including the introduction of Buddhism into China. The book examines key issues and debates in early Chinese philosophy, cross-influences between its traditions and interpretations by scholars up (...)
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  20. Can a Daoist Sage Have Close Relationships with Other Human Beings?Joanna Iwanowska - 2017 - Diametros 52:23-46.
    This paper explores the compatibility between the Daoist art of emptying one’s heart-mind and the art of creating close relationships. The fact that a Daoist sage is characterized by an empty heart-mind makes him somewhat different from an average human being: since a full heart-mind is characteristic of the human condition, the sage transcends what makes us human. This could alienate him from others and make him incapable of developing close relationships. The research goal of this paper is to investigate (...)
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  21. Daoism and Disability.Andrew Lambert - 2016 - In Darla Yvonne Schumm & Michael Stoltzfus (eds.), Disability and World Religions: An Introduction. Baylor University Press.
    Ideas found in the early Daoist texts can inform current debates about disability, since the latter often involve assumptions about personhood and agency that Daoist texts do not share. The two canonical texts of classical Daoism, the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi, do not explicitly discuss disability as an object of theory or offer a model of it. They do, however, provide conceptual resources that can enrich contemporary discussions of disability. Two particular ideas are discussed here. Classical Daoist thinking about the (...)
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  22. What is nature? – ziran in early Daoist thinking.Jing Liu - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (3):265-279.
    ABSTRACTThe question of the relation between humans and nature lies at the foundation of any philosophy. With the daily worsening environmental crisis, we are forced to face this ancient question again. Yet when we put it into the form of ‘humans and nature’, a metaphysics is already implied and the problem of nature has not yet been questioned. At this moment, the very question that needs to be put forward is, ‘What is nature’? The question of nature will be interrogated (...)
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  23. The ethical implications of the Daoist world view.Kevin Mager - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (3):206-215.
    ABSTRACTDaoist ethics are difficult to pinpoint in a Western ethical framework. At times classic Daoist texts advocate for certain ways of life over others, yet at other times they rebel against the notions of right and wrong. This attitude about right and wrong, leads some to believe that Daoists are moral relativists who believe that right and wrong are merely an arbitrary valuing within the mind and that there is no justification for external moral critique. Others believe that there is (...)
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  24. Lao Tzu's Ethics: Taoism (Ethics-1, M35).Shyam Ranganathan - 2016 - In A. Raghuramaraju (ed.), Philosophy, E-Pg Pathshala. Delhi: India, Department of Higher Education (NMEICT).
    This module is a review of the guiding ideas of Lao Tzu’s ethics of wu wei and the Tao, an account of Lao Tzu’s prioritisation of the feminine as a basic moral principle, the problem of masculinity for practical rationality, his criticism of language, doctrines and oppressive politics. Finally, we shall evaluate the moral import of Lao Tzu’s teachings, and close with some reflections on the synergy between Taoist and Madhyamaka Buddhist thought, which rendered the latter so easily received in (...)
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  25. The Triads of Expression and the Four Paradoxes of Sense: A Deleuzean Reading of the Two Opening Aphorisms of the Dao De Jing.Tatsiana Silantsyeva - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):355-377.
    Following Deleuze’s analysis of expressivity, this article approaches the two opening aphorisms of the Dao De Jing 道德經 as two movements of a triadic differentiation of expressive elements. These aphorisms are further presented within four Deleuzean paradoxes which necessarily accompany linguistic expression. Simultaneously, the opening lines are also analyzed as philosophical problems which constitute the core of the Daoist project itself within which the unthinkable or ineffable must be conceived of not as conditioned by privation or negation, but as being (...)
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  26. Fortune and the Dao: A Comparative Study of Machiavelli, the Daodejing, and the Han Feizi.Jason P. Blahuta - 2015 - Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books.
    Times of prolonged conflict spur great minds to seek a lasting peace. Thus was the case of Warring States China, which saw the rise of the Hundred Schools of Thought, including the Doadejing and the Han Feizi, and Renaissance Italy, which produced Niccolò Machiavelli. Witnessing their respective societies fall prey to internal corruption and external aggression, all three thinkers sought ways to produce a strong, stable state that would allow both the leader and the populace to endure. Fortune and the (...)
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  27. Critical analysis of the philosophical conception of verification of being/the self in Heidegger's “Being and Time” against dao/the other in Laozi's Daodejing.Lucian Green - 2015 - Best Thinking.
    That dao and being are correct as written about by Laozi and Heidegger respectively is exposed through eight perspectives.
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  28. Ecstatic Language of Early Daoism: A Sufi Point of View.Esmaeil Radpour - 2015 - Transcendent Philosophy Journal 16:213-230.
    Various esoteric traditions apply different modes of expression for the same metaphysical truths. We may name the two most known esoteric languages as ecstatic and scholastic. Early Daoist use of reverse symbolism as for metaphysical truths and its critical way of viewing formalist understanding of traditional teachings, common virtues and popular beliefs show that it applies an ecstatic language, which, being called shaṭḥ in Sufi terminology, has a detailed literature and technical description in Sufism. This article tries, after a short (...)
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  29. Well-Being and Daoism.Justin Tiwald - 2015 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-Being. New York,: Routledge. pp. 56-69.
    In this chapter, I explicate several general views and arguments that bear on the notion and contemporary theories of human welfare, as found in two foundational Daoist texts, the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi. Ideas drawn from the Daodejing include its objections to desire theories of human welfare and its distinction between natural and acquired desires. Insights drawn from the Zhuangzi include its arguments against the view that death is bad for the dead, its attempt to develop a workable theory of (...)
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  30. The Ideas of Human Nature in Early China.Guo Yi - 2015 - In R. A. H. King (ed.), The Good Life and Conceptions of Life in Early China and Graeco-Roman Antiquity. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 93-116.
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  31. Hegel, Lao-Tzu and Bohr.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2014 - In Wayne Cristaudo, Heung Wah Wong & Sun Youzhoung (eds.), Order and Revolt: Debating the Principles of Eastern and Western Social Thought. Bridge21 Publishers.
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  32. Meontological Generativity: A Daoist Reading of the Thing.David Chai - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (2):303-318.
    This paper relocates the philosophical discourse on the Thing (das Ding) to the world of classical Daoism. In doing so, it explores the bond between the One, the Thing and its signifier before discussing how the Thing unveils itself to the world while receiving the gift of nothingness from Dao. It furthermore contends that the two most prominent discussions of the Thing in the Western tradition--those by Heidegger and Lacan--while philosophically valuable in their own right, fail to provide the degree (...)
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  33. Daoism and Wu.David Chai - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (10):663-671.
    This paper introduces the concept of nothingness as used in classical Daoist philosophy, building upon contemporary scholarship by offering a uniquely phenomenological reading of the term. It will be argued that the Chinese word wu bears upon two planes of reality concurrently: as ontological nothingness and as ontic nonbeing. Presenting wu in this dyadic manner is essential if we wish to avoid equating it with Dao itself, as many have been wont to do; rather, wu is the mystery that perpetually (...)
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  34. Daoism, Nature and Humanity.David E. Cooper - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:95-108.
    This paper sympathetically explores Daoism's relevance to environmental philosophy and to the aspiration of people to live in a manner convergent with nature. After discussing the Daoist understanding of nature and the dao (Way), the focus turns to the implications of these notions for our relationship to nature. The popular idea that Daoism encourages a return to a way of life is rejected. Instead, it is shown that the Daoist proposal is one of living more than people generally do in (...)
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  35. An Introduction to Daoist Philosophies. By Steve Coutinho.Xingming Hu - 2014 - International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (4):463-465.
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  36. The Philosophy of the Proto-Wenzi.Paul van Els - 2014 - In Xiaogan Liu (ed.), Dao: Companion to Daoist Philosophy. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 325–40.
    This paper presents the main aspects of the proto-Wenzi’s philosophy, with a focus on its intricate relationship with the Laozi. They show that the proto-Wenzi advocates a philosophy of quietude, not only in terms of its content, but also through the rhetoric it uses to create a harmonious synthesis of diverse, and at times even incompatible, ideas.
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  37. A Review of the Issues Related to "Names" in Lao Zi's First Stanza: Brought on by the Discovery of the Peking University Han Bamboo Slip Laozi. [REVIEW]Cao Feng - 2013 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 44 (4):72-91.
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  38. The Paradox of Wuwei? Yes (and No).Nickolas Knightly - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (2):115-136.
    This essay considers P. J. Ivanhoe's critical challenge to Slingerland's analysis of wuwei(‘effortless action’). While I agree with Ivanhoe that we should do more work to embody and understand the concept of wuwei, I will defend Slingerland's notion that wuwei involves paradox—particularly in the cases of Zhuangi and Laozi. The present essay is not a defense of the specifics of Slingerland's analysis. Nonetheless, this essay focuses on defending the notion of paradox. Ivanhoe offers an alternative view of wuwei, one that (...)
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  39. Confucian and Taoist Work Values: An Exploratory Study of the Chinese Transformational Leadership Behavior. [REVIEW]Liang-Hung Lin, Yu-Ling Ho & Wei-Hsin Eugenia Lin - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):91-103.
    When it comes to Chinese transformational leadership behavior, the focus seems to be Confucian work value; nonetheless, it represents only one of the Chinese traditions. In order to have a better understanding the relationship between Chinese traditional values and transformational leadership behavior, Taoist work value should also be taken into consideration. Thus, this study firstly develops Confucian and Taoist work value scale (study 1) and then applies this scale to examine its relationship with transformational leadership (study 2). The results show (...)
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  40. A Daoist Model For A Kantian Church.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):67-89.
    Although significant differences undoubtedly exist between Daoism and Kant’s philosophy, the two systems also have some noteworthy similarities. After calling attention to a few such parallels and sketching the outlines of Kant’s philosophy of religion, this article focuses on an often-neglected feature of the latter: the four guiding principles of what Kant calls an “invisible church”. Numerous passages from Lao Zi’s classic text, Dao-De-Jing, seem to uphold these same principles, thus suggesting that they can also be interpreted as core features (...)
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  41. What’s in a Dao?: Ontology and Semiotics in Laozi and Zhuangzi.Daniel Fried - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (4):419-436.
    The present essay examines the conflicting ontological assumptions that one can find behind the word dao in the texts of the Laozi and Zhuangzi and argues that the relative indifference to these texts toward whether or not dao has an ontic reality should not be considered a flaw of early Daoism. Rather, the historical process by which the term dao collects various possible ontological implications can be thought of as a philosophical stance in its own right. That is, if the (...)
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  42. Hyperion as Daoist Masterpiece: Keats and the Daodejing.Joshua M. Hall - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (3):225-237.
    It should come as little surprise to anyone familiar with his concept of ‘negative capability’ and even a cursory understanding of Daoism that John Keats’ thought resonates strongly with that tradition. Given the pervasive, reductive understanding of Keats as a mere Romantic, however, this source of insight has been used to little advantage. His poem Hyperion, for example, has been roundly criticized as an untidy Romantic fragment. Here, by contrast, I will argue for a strategic understanding of Hyperion as a (...)
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  43. Levinas and the Daodejing on the Feminine: Intercultural Reflections.Lin Ma - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (S1):152-170.
    This article revisits the theme of the feminine in Levinas's writings and the Daodejing. First it addresses the question why the feminine as thematized through eros in Levinas's early work loses her centrality in his later texts. Second it explores the feminine water metaphor and the Dao of ci 雌 in the Daodejing. On the basis of these interpretations, it attempts at an analysis of relevant ambiguities and problematics concealed in Levinas's philosophical enterprise, and urges for the exigency of an (...)
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  44. The Pristine Dao: Metaphysics in Early Daoist Discourse.Thomas Michael - 2012 - State University of New York Press.
    The Laozi (Daodejing) and the Zhuangzi have long been familiar to Western readers and have served as basic sources of knowledge about early Chinese Daoism. Modern translations and studies of these works have encouraged a perception of Daoism as a mystical philosophy heavy with political implications that advises kings to become one with the Dao. Breaking with this standard approach, The Pristine Dao argues that the Laozi and the Zhuangzi participated in a much wider tradition of metaphysical discourse that included (...)
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  45. The Moral Fool: A Case for Amorality (review).Geir Sigurðsson - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (2):305-308.
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  46. Tilting Vessels and Collapsing Walls: On the Rhetorical Function of Anecdotes in Early Chinese Texts.Paul van Els - 2012 - Extrême-Orient Extrême-Occident 34:141–66.
    Early Chinese argumentative texts are full of historical anecdotes. These short accounts of events in Chinese history enhance the appeal of the text, but they also have an important rhetorical function in helping the reader understand, accept, and remember the arguments propounded in the text. In this paper I examine the rhetorical function of historical anecdotes in two argumentative texts of the Western Han dynasty (202 BCE-9 CE): Han’s Illustrations of the Odes for Outsiders and The Master of Huainan. These (...)
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  47. On Laozi’s Dao—An Attempt to Make Philosophy Speak Chinese.Ruohui Li - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):1-19.
    How is the meaning of the Dao to be understood? To answer this question, we should not make indiscreet remarks outside of the framework of Laozi’s thought; rather, we should enter the system, helping Laozi to establish a philosophical system on the Dao. Such an establishment is equivalent to that of a logical system of Laozi’s philosophy. We consider the presentation of Laozi’s thought as unverified propositions, and the purpose of this essay is to expound on these propositions and make (...)
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  48. A Short Response to Edward Slingerland.Hans-Georg Moeller - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):535-536.
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  49. Co měl Laozi v úmyslu říci? Chanova hermeneutická výzva.Daniel D. Novotný - 2011 - Fragmenta Ioannea Collecta 2011 (3):47–64.
    V tomto článku se zamýšlím nad možností „správné“ (objektivní, adekvátní) interpretace Dao De Jingu (DDJ). Zamyšlení nad „komunikační situací“ vede k rozlišení několika základních prvků (autor, text, interpret, adresát). K jednotlivým prvkům stručně shrnuji současný stav interpretačního úsilí odborníků na DDJ (opíraje se především o článek A. Chana). Kontroverzní povaha výsledků současného bádání nás nemá vést ke skepticismu „integrativní hermeneutiky“, která na adekvátní interpretaci rezignuje. Je možné se i nadále držet principů „rekonstruktivní hermeneutiky“, která spatřuje adekvátní interpretaci jakožto svůj cíl.
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  50. Emotionales in confucianism and daoism: A new interpretation.L. I. U. Qingping - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):118-133.
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