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Siblings:See also:History/traditions: Human Nature

910 found
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  1. Stoic Lessons in Liberation: Epictetus as Educator.William O. Stephens - manuscript
    My project examines the pedagogical approach of the Stoic Epictetus by focusing on seven vital lessons he imparts. This study will deepen our understanding of his vocation as a Stoic educator striving to free his students from the fears and foolishness that hold happiness hostage. These lessons are (1) how freedom, integrity, self-respect, and happiness interrelate; (2) real versus fake tragedy and real versus fake heroism; (3) the instructive roles that various animals play in Stoic education; (4) athleticism, sport, and (...)
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  2. Georg Northoff’s (University of Ottawa) many ideas published after 2010 are quite surprinsingly similar to my ideas published in 2005 and 2008, but are in a wrong context, the “unicorn world” (the world).Gabriel Vacariu - manuscript
    Many ideas from Georg Nortoff’s works (published one paper in 2010, mainly his book in 2011, other papers in 2012, 2103, 2014, especially those related to Kant’s philosophy and the notion of the “observer”, the mind-brain problem, default mode network, the self, the mental states and their “correspondence” to the brain) are surprisingly very similar to my ideas published in my article from 2002, 2005 and my book from 2008. In two papers from 2002 (also my paper from 2005 and (...)
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  3. On Human Nature.Mota Victor - manuscript
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  4. Sean Sayers, Marxism and Human Nature.T. Burns - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  5. Human Nature in Characters and Motivation in Authors: A Look at Hawthorne and Poe.Sarah Coronado - forthcoming - Human Nature.
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  6. Nature's children: environmental history as human natural history.Daniel Flores - forthcoming - Human/Nature: Biology, Culture, and Environmental History.
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  7. Varieties of Philosophical Humanism and Conceptions of Science.Ian James Kidd - forthcoming - In A forthcoming volume on science and humanism. Chicago: Chicago University Press.
    This chapter describes some of the varieties of philosophical humanism and different conceptions of, and attitudes towards, the natural sciences. I focus on three kinds of humanism evident in 20th century European philosophy – humanism as essentialism, humanism as rational subjectivity, and existential humanism. Some are strongly allied to the sciences, others are antipathetic to them, while others offer subtler positions. By emphasising this diversity, I want to oppose claims about the inevitability of an 'alliance' of science to humanism, and (...)
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  8. Historicism and anthropology in Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology A review of Hegel's" Phenomenology of Spirit".Hans-Peter Krueger - forthcoming - Hegel-Studien.
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  9. Trying Out One's New Sword.Mary Midgley - forthcoming - Ethics in the Workplace: Selected Readings in Business Ethics.
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  10. Pre-AP English 10 17 February 2009 Human Nature According to Golding, Freud, and Katrina In his novel Lord of the Flies, William Golding examines the relationship between civilization and savagery by illustrating how society's mores lose their hold when people are reduced to basic survival. His characters represent different facets of human nature, including peace, logic, violence, and power, but eventually they succumb to the selfish, power-driven aspect of their personalities. [REVIEW]Carrie Misenheimer - forthcoming - Human Nature.
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  11. Philosophical Anthropology and Political Theory.On Tilo Schabert’S. - forthcoming - Sapientia.
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  12. The Human Person and Nature in Classical and Modern India.Raffaele Torella & Giorgio Milanetti (eds.) - forthcoming
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  13. Is a conservative philosophical anthropology possible?Eliseo Vivas - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  14. Philosophical anthropology in Marxism.Paul Walton, Andrew Gamble & Jeff Coulter - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  15. Interrogating Incoherence and Prospects for a Trans-Positive Psychiatry.Robert A. Wilson - forthcoming - Australasian Philosophical Review.
    Invited commentary on Nicole A. Vincent and Emma A. Jane, “Interrogating Incongruence: Conceptual and Normative Problems with ICD-11’s and DSM-5’s Diagnostic Categories for Transgender People” Australasian Philosophical Review, in press. -/- The core of Vincent and Jane’s Interrogating Incongruence is critical of the appeal to the concept of incongruence in DSM-5 and ICD-11 characterisations of trans people, a critique taken to be ground-clearing for more trans-positive, psychiatrically-infused medical interventions. I concur with Vincent and Jane’s ultimate goals but depart from the (...)
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  16. The Goals of World State.Casian Anton - 2022 - London: Casian Anton.
    In this research paper, I decided to go against the negative thread of the world state and (i) I challenge the conventional wisdom of the negative goals of the world state by exploring fifty positive goals; (ii) I help to improve the human imagination regarding the possibility of a positive end of the world state; (iii) I invite people to believe that the world state is good for humanity as quickly as they think it is bad for humanity; (iv) I (...)
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  17. Taking metaphysics seriously: Kant on the foundations of ethics.E. Sonny Elizondo - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):793-807.
    Ask most philosophers for an example of a moral rationalist, and they will probably answer “Kant.” And no wonder. Kant’s first great work of moral philosophy, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, opens with a clarion call for rationalism, proclaiming the need to work out for once a pure moral philosophy, a metaphysics of morals. That this metaphysics includes the first principle of ethics, the moral law, is obvious. But what about the second principles, particular moral laws, such as duties (...)
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  18. Perfectionism and Dignity.Pablo Gilabert - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):259-278.
    Perfectionism about well-being is, at a minimum, the view that people’s lives go well when, and because they realize their capacities. It is common to link perfectionism with an idea of human essence or nature, to yield the view that what constitutes people’s well-being is the development and exercise of characteristically human capacities. The first part of this paper considers the very serious problems associated with the idea of human nature or essence, and argues that perfectionism would be more plausible (...)
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  19. Consider the Bristlecone Pine.Bennett Gilbert - 2022 - Borderland/Espacio Fronterizo/Espace Frontière.
    A short reflection on the permeability of our mental and physical boundaries based on the oldest known living plant, the Bristlecone Pine.
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  20. Fine-Tuning Human Rights for Spiritual Well-Being.Deepa Kansra - 2022 - Psychology Today.
    There are many reasons to suggest that human rights have a spiritual flavor. Grounded in the understanding that individuals and communities have spiritual interests, the idea of human rights has been called upon time and again to protect and provide for them. This development has raised questions about what spiritual interests are and what role human rights can play in this regard. On a cursory glance, linking human rights to spirituality benefits three right-holders: individuals, communities, and humanity as a whole. (...)
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  21. Science, Religion, and Human Identity: Contributions From the Science and Religion Forum.Finley Lawson - 2022 - Zygon 57 (3):595-598.
    The Science and Religion Forum promotes discussion on issues at the interface of science and religion. The forum membership is diverse including professionals, academics, clergy, and interested lay people and each year it holds a conference to encourage discussion and exploration of issues that arise at the interface of science and religion. This article provides an overview of the online conference that took place in May 2021 and introduces this thematic section that includes six articles from the conference.
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  22. Bodymind.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2022 - The Philosopher 110 (4).
    In lieu of an abstract, an excerpt: "The idea of the life worth living is as old as human thought. Pick your tradition or epoch; whether it is characterized as religious, philosophical, ethnic, or cultural, one finds a constant: humans are in the business of distinguishing the good from the merely extant, the what-should-be from the what-is. A staggeringly wide swath of intellectual and religious traditions across the ages agrees on this point: organisms like us are not content with how (...)
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  23. Meta-Theories, Interpretability, and Human Nature: A Reply to J. David Velleman.Hagop Sarkissian - 2022 - Philosophy East and West 72 (1):252-257.
    My thanks to David Velleman for a clear and constructive response to my comment. He raises two issues that might benefit from some further brief remarks. The first concerns the error-theory I put forth to explain why the early Confucians were not relativists. The second concerns the extent to which the Confucian notion of harmony is at odds with Velleman's notion of interpretability or coherence. I consider each in turn, below.
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  24. Well-Functioning Daos and Moral Relativism.Hagop Sarkissian - 2022 - Philosophy East and West 72 (1):230-247.
    What are the nature and status of moral norms? And what makes individuals abide by them? These are central questions in metaethics. The first concerns the nature of the moral domain—for example, whether it exists independently of what individuals or groups think of it. The second concerns the bindingness or practical clout of moral norms—how individuals feel impelled to abide by them. In this article, I bring two distinct approaches to these questions into dialogue with one another.
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  25. Soul‐Switching and the Immateriality of Human Nature: On an Argument Reported by Razi.Pirooz Fatoorchi - 2021 - Theoria 87 (5):1067-1082.
    This article deals with an argument reported by Razi (d. 1210) that attempted to undermine the immaterialist position about human nature. After some introductory remarks and explanation of the conceptual background, the article analyses the structure of the argument, with special attention to the idea of soul-switching.’ Some comparisons are made between the argument reported by Razi and a number of arguments from modern and contemporary eras of philosophy. One section is devoted to the critique of the argument and its (...)
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  26. Können nichtmenschliche Tiere handeln?Geert Keil - 2021 - In Roland Kipke, Nele Röttger, Johanna Wagner & Almut Kristine von Wedelstaedt (eds.), ZusammenDenken. Berlin/Heidelberg/Wiesbaden: Springer VS. pp. 159-177.
    Ralf Stoecker hat argumentiert, dass allein Menschen im strengen Sinne handeln könnten, weil sie allein fähig seien, etwas aus Gründen zu tun und über diese Gründe Rechenschaft abzulegen. In einem weniger strengen Sinn könnten auch Tiere handeln. Ich werde in diesem Beitrag zunächst Stoeckers Begründung seiner zweigeteilten These rekapitulieren (1) und dann zwei Rückfragen dazu stellen: (a) Warum soll es gerade die Praxis des logon didonai sein, die Verhalten zu Handlungen im engen Sinne macht? (b) Warum soll es genau zwei (...)
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  27. Donald Phillip Verene, The Science of Cookery and the Art of Eating Well, Studies in Medical Philosophy, no. 3, Stuttgart: ibidem-Verlag, 2018, eBook, 124 pp., € 14.99, ISBN: 978-3-8382-7198-9. [REVIEW]Riccardo Magini - 2021 - Sofia Philosophical Review 14:35-37.
  28. Vita buona e interazione con l’ambiente.Armando Manchisi - 2021 - In Etica e natura. Napoli-Salerno: pp. 137-150.
    The starting point for this essay is the idea that a good life is a life in which a person realizes herself, i.e. pursues those ends that she has reason to value. On this basis, I aim, first, to clarify the structure of human self-realization, that is, to understand how it “works”, and, second, to shed light on the role played by the natural environment in that structure. My main goal is thus to provide a theoretical framework in which nature (...)
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  29. How Valuable Could a Person Be?Joshua Rasmussen & Andrew M. Bailey - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (2):264-277.
    We investigate the value of persons. Our primary goal is to chart a path from equal and extreme value to infinite value. We advance two arguments. Each argument offers a reason to think that equal and extreme value are best accounted for if we are infinitely valuable. We then raise some difficult but fruitful questions about the possible grounds or sources of our infinite value, if we indeed have such value.
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  30. ¿Es el pensamiento transhumanista una amenaza a la dignidad humana?Julio C. Silva - 2021 - Futuro Hoy 2 (2):25-28.
    Este ensayo examina críticamente la tesis – defendida por filósofos bioconservadores – que sostiene que el pensamiento transhumanista constituye una amenaza a la dignidad humana. A partir de esta consideración, defenderemos las siguientes tesis: primero, el pensamiento transhumanista nos conduce a replantear la noción de dignidad humana para hacerla más amplia y ofrecer, en su lugar, la noción de dignidad de los seres sintientes; segundo, la principal preocupación no es si llegasen a existir tales seres (los transhumanos), sino si es (...)
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  31. Artificial intelligence and its natural limits.Karl D. Stephan & Gyula Klima - 2021 - AI and Society (1):9-18.
    An argument with roots in ancient Greek philosophy claims that only humans are capable of a certain class of thought termed conceptual, as opposed to perceptual thought, which is common to humans, the higher animals, and some machines. We outline the most detailed modern version of this argument due to Mortimer Adler, who in the 1960s argued for the uniqueness of the human power of conceptual thought. He also admitted that if conceptual thought were ever manifested by machines, such an (...)
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  32. Rethinking Incest Avoidance: Beyond the Disciplinary Groove of Culture-First Views.Robert A. Wilson - 2021 - Biological Theory 16 (3):162-175.
    The Westermarck Effect posits that intimate association during childhood promotes human incest avoidance. In previous work, I articulated and defended a version of the Westermarck Effect by developing a phylogenetic argument that has purchase within primatology but that has had more limited appeal for cultural anthropologists due to their commitment to conventionalist or culture-first accounts of incest avoidance. Here I look to advance the discussion of incest and incest avoidance beyond culture-first accounts in two ways. First, I shall dig deeper (...)
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  33. The Feeling Animal.Andrew M. Bailey & Allison Krile Thornton - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7:554-567.
    For good or for ill, we have animal bodies. Through them, we move around, eat and drink, and do many other things besides. We owe much – perhaps our very lives – to these ever-present animals. But how exactly do we relate to our animals? Are we parts of them, or they of us? Do we and these living animals co-inhere or constitute or coincide? Or what? Animalism answers that we are identical to them. There are many objections to animalism, (...)
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  34. Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence (Wiley-Blackwell, 2016). [REVIEW]Stefano Bigliardi - 2020 - Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy 3:1-19.
  35. Are Humans More Equal Than Other Animals? An Evolutionary Argument Against Exclusively Human Dignity.Rainer Ebert - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (5):1807-1823.
    Secular arguments for equal and exclusively human worth generally tend to follow one of two strategies. One, which has recently gained renewed attention because of a novel argument by S. Matthew Liao, aims to directly ground worth in an intrinsic property that all humans have in common, whereas the other concedes that there is no morally relevant intrinsic difference between all humans and all other animals, and instead appeals to the membership of all humans in a special kind. In this (...)
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  36. Humanism and the Death of God: Searching for the Good After Darwin, Marx, and Nietzsche. By Ronald E. Osborn. Pp. 256. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2017, £58.00. [REVIEW]Peter Joseph Fritz - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (2):364-365.
    Humanism and the Death of God is a critical exploration of secular humanism and its discontents. Through close readings of three exemplary nineteenth-century philosophical naturalists or materialists, who perhaps more than anyone set the stage for our contemporary quandaries when it comes to questions of human nature and moral obligation, Ronald E. Osborn argues that "the death of God" ultimately tends toward the death of liberal understandings of the human as well. Any fully persuasive defense of humanistic values - including (...)
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  37. Why are there no platypuses at the Olympics?: A teleological case for athletes with disorders of sexual development to compete within their sex category.Nathan Gamble & Michal Pruski - 2020 - South African Journal of Sports Medicine 32 (1).
    In mid-2019, the controversy regarding South African runner Caster Semenya’s eligibility to participate in competitions against other female runners culminated in a Court of Arbitration for Sport judgement. Semenya possessed high endogenous testosterone levels (arguably a performance advantage), secondary to a disorder of sexual development. In this commentary, Aristotelean teleology is used to defend the existence of ‘male’ and ‘female’ as discrete categories. It is argued that once the athlete’s sex is established, they should be allowed to compete in the (...)
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  38. Review of Michael Austin, Humility and Human Flourishing: A Study in Analytic Moral Theology, Oxford Univ. Press, 2018. [REVIEW]Jeanine Grenberg - 2020 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (1):205.
  39. Neither Ancient nor Modern: Discerning Catholicism’s Claim about the Human Person.Marc D. Guerra - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):58-69.
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  40. On Ethics, Politics and Psychology in the Twenty‐First Century . By John Rist. Pp. ix, 177, London, Bloomsbury, £16.19.Matthew Harris - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):182-184.
  41. A Meaning to Life. By Michael Ruse. Pp. ix, 149, NY, Oxford University Press, 2019, $14.49. [REVIEW]Timb D. Hoswell - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (2):357-358.
    Does human life have any meaning? Does the question even make sense today? For centuries, the question of the meaning or purpose of human life was assumed by scholars and theologians to have a religious answer: life has meaning because humans were made in the image of a good god. In the 19th century, however, Charles Darwin's theory of evolution changed everything-and the human organism was seen to be more machine than spirit. Ever since, with the rise of science and (...)
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  42. Was ist der Mensch? Ein Streifzug durch die philosophische Anthropologie.Geert Keil - 2020 - In Ulrich Lüke & Georg Souvignier (eds.), Der Mensch – ein Tier. Und sonst? Interdisziplinäre Annäherungen. Freiburg: Herder. pp. 19-44.
    1. Die Frage nach der Natur des Menschen und die Rede vom „Menschenbild“ 2. Die anthropologischen Definitionsformeln 3. Die Zuständigkeitsfrage 4. Die abenteuerliche Kürze der Definitionsformeln 5. Der Mensch-Tier-Vergleich 6. Warum sollte die menschliche Natur unwandelbar sein? 7. Kategorische und graduelle Unterschiede 8. Ausblick: Die Transformationsthese.
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  43. Humankind, Human Nature, and Misanthropy.Ian James Kidd - 2020 - Metascience 29 (3):505-508.
    An essay review of Rutger Bregman's "Humankind: A Hopeful History" (2020).
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  44. Being human: Why and in what sense it is morally relevant.Roland Kipke - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (2):148-158.
    The debate on the question of the moral status of human beings and the boundaries of the moral community has long been dominated by the antagonism between personism and speciesism: either certain mental properties or membership of the human species is considered morally crucial. In this article, I argue that both schools of thought are equally implausible in major respects, and that these shortcomings arise from the same reason in both cases: a biological notion of being human. By contrast, I (...)
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  45. Evolution of Desire: A Life of René Girard. By Cynthia L. Haven. Pp. 317, East Lansing, MI, Michigan State University Press, 2018, $26.96. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (2):349-350.
  46. Givenness & Revelation. By Jean‐Luc Marion. Translated by Stephen E. Lewis. Pp. xviii, 137, Oxford University Press, 2016, £12.99. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (5):884-885.
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  47. A Natural History of Human Thinking. By Michael Tomasello. Pp. xi, 178, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 2014, $19.95. [REVIEW]Bradford McCall - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (5):878-878.
  48. Mary Midgley: An Introduction.Gregory McElwain - 2020 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic Press.
    For over 40 years, Mary Midgley made a forceful case for the relevance and importance of philosophy. With characteristic wit and wisdom, she drew special attention to the ways in which our thought influences our everyday lives. Her wide-ranging explorations of human nature and the self; our connections with animals and the natural world; and the complexities of morality, gender, science, and religion all contributed to her reputation as one of the most expansive and compelling moral philosophers of the twentieth (...)
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  49. Edith Stein’s Conception of Human Unity and Bodily Formation: A Thomistically Informed Understanding.Robert McNamara - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (4):639-663.
    The problem of human unity lies at the heart of Edith Stein’s investigation of the structure of human nature in her mature works. By examining her resolution of this problem in Der Aufbau der menschlichen Person and Endliches und ewiges Sein, I show how Stein incorporates two foundational teachings of Thomistic anthropology, namely, the substantial unity of the human being and the soul as form of the body, while reinterpreting the meaning of these teachings through performing a fresh phenomenological investigation. (...)
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  50. Reflections on the readings of sundays and feasts March-May 2020.Chris Monaghan - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (1):101.
    Many people wonder as they look at their newborn child about how this perfect child can be marked by original sin. This invites us to look more deeply at our understanding of human nature and our capacity to make choices that can give life to ourselves and others, or take life and diminish it. While we have tended to identify the sin of the first couple as some sort of sexual sin, this is not supported by the text of Genesis. (...)
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