Results for 'patient'

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  1. Patient Autonomy and the Ethics of Responsibility.Alfred I. Tauber - 2005 - MIT Press.
    The principle of patient autonomy dominates the contemporary debate over medical ethics. In this examination of the doctor-patient relationship, physician and philosopher Alfred Tauber argues that the idea of patient autonomy -- which was inspired by other rights-based movements of the 1960s -- was an extrapolation from political and social philosophy that fails to ground medicine's moral philosophy. He proposes instead a reconfiguration of personal autonomy and a renewed commitment to an ethics of care. In this formulation, (...)
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  2. The Patient in the Family: An Ethics of Medicine and Families.Hilde Lindemann Nelson & James Lindemann Nelson - 1995 - Routledge.
    The Patient in the Family diagnoses the ways in which the worlds of home and hospital misunderstand each other. The authors explore how medicine, through its new reproductive technologies, is altering the stucture of families, how families can participate more fully in medical decision-making, and how to understand the impact on families of medical advances to extend life but not vitality.
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  3.  9
    Patient’s Dignity in Intensive Care Unit: A Critical Ethnography.Farimah Shirani Bidabadi, Ahmadreza Yazdannik & Ali Zargham-Boroujeni - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (3):738-752.
    Background:Maintaining patient’s dignity in intensive care units is difficult because of the unique conditions of both critically-ill patients and intensive care units.Objectives:The aim of this study was to uncover the cultural factors that impeded maintaining patients’ dignity in the cardiac surgery intensive care unit.Research Design:The study was conducted using a critical ethnographic method proposed by Carspecken.Participants and research context:Participants included all physicians, nurses and staffs working in the study setting. Data collection methods included participant observations, formal and informal interviews, (...)
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  4. Patient-Relativity in Morality.Matthew Hammerton - 2016 - Ethics 127 (1):06-26.
    It is common to distinguish moral rules, reasons, or values that are agent-relative from those that are agent-neutral. One can also distinguish moral rules, reasons, or values that are moment-relative from those that are moment-neutral. In this article, I introduce a third distinction that stands alongside these two distinctions—the distinction between moral rules, reasons, or values that are patient-relative and those that are patient-neutral. I then show how patient-relativity plays an important role in several moral theories, gives (...)
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  5.  18
    Patient Autonomy Is a Right, But Exercising That Right May Not Be an Obligation for Patients and Kin.Thor Willy Ruud Hansen - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):32-33.
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  6.  2
    The patient experience of medically unexplained symptoms: an existentialist analysis.Kimberly S. Engels - forthcoming - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-19.
    This article explores the patient experience of medically unexplained symptoms from an existentialist standpoint. Drawing on the work of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, I explore their concepts of existential situation, existential project, authenticity, and praxis. I then analyze the situation of MUS patients in the current cultural and institutional context, elucidating that a lack of explanation for their symptoms puts MUS patients in an existential bind. I illustrate the effects of the experience of MUS on patients’ existential (...)
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  7.  14
    Patient and Family Descriptions of Ethical Concerns.Hae Lin Cho, Christine Grady, Anita Tarzian, Gail Povar, Jed Mangal & Marion Danis - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):52-64.
    Ethically challenging situations routinely arise in the course of illness and healthcare. However, very few studies have surveyed patients and family members about their experiences with ethically challenging situations. To address this gap in the literature, we surveyed patients and family members at three hospitals. We conducted a content analysis of their responses to open-ended questions about their most memorable experience with an ethical concern for them or their family member. Participants described 219 unique ethical experiences that spanned many of (...)
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  8.  9
    The Patient as Person: Explorations in Medical Ethics.Paul Ramsey - 1970 - New Haven: Yale University Press.
    A Christian ethicist discusses such problems as organ transplants, caring for the terminally ill, and defining death.
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  9.  43
    Patient Preference Predictors and the Problem of Naked Statistical Evidence.Nathaniel Paul Sharadin - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):857-862.
    Patient preference predictors (PPPs) promise to provide medical professionals with a new solution to the problem of making treatment decisions on behalf of incapacitated patients. I show that the use of PPPs faces a version of a normative problem familiar from legal scholarship: the problem of naked statistical evidence. I sketch two sorts of possible reply, vindicating and debunking, and suggest that our reply to the problem in the one domain ought to mirror our reply in the other. The (...)
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  10. Artificial Intelligence and Patient-Centered Decision-Making.Jens Christian Bjerring & Jacob Busch - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 34 (2):349-371.
    Advanced AI systems are rapidly making their way into medical research and practice, and, arguably, it is only a matter of time before they will surpass human practitioners in terms of accuracy, reliability, and knowledge. If this is true, practitioners will have a prima facie epistemic and professional obligation to align their medical verdicts with those of advanced AI systems. However, in light of their complexity, these AI systems will often function as black boxes: the details of their contents, calculations, (...)
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  11.  7
    Patient, Heal Thyself: How the New Medicine Puts the Patient in Charge.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    The puzzling case of the broken arm -- Hernias, diets, and drugs -- Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients -- Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights -- Societal interests and duties to others -- The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants -- Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" -- Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? (...)
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  12.  53
    Treating Patients as Persons: A Capabilities Approach to Support Delivery of Person-Centered Care.Vikki A. Entwistle & Ian S. Watt - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (8):29-39.
    Health services internationally struggle to ensure health care is ?person-centered? (or similar). In part, this is because there are many interpretations of ?person-centered care? (and near synonyms), some of which seem unrealistic for some patients or situations and obscure the intrinsic value of patients? experiences of health care delivery. The general concern behind calls for person-centered care is an ethical one: Patients should be ?treated as persons.? We made novel use of insights from the capabilities approach to characterize person-centered care (...)
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  13.  32
    Patient and Citizen Participation in Health: The Need for Improved Ethical Support.Laura Williamson - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):4-16.
    Patient and citizen participation is now regarded as central to the promotion of sustainable health and health care. Involvement efforts create and encounter many diverse ethical challenges that have the potential to enhance or undermine their success. This article examines different expressions of patient and citizen participation and the support health ethics offers. It is contended that despite its prominence and the link between patient empowerment and autonomy, traditional bioethics is insufficient to guide participation efforts. In addition, (...)
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  14.  9
    Patient Participation in Healthcare Practice in Greenland: Local Challenges and Global Reflections.Tine Aagaard & Tove Borg - 2018 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 19 (1):07-24.
    Various kinds of user and patient involvement are spreading in healthcare in most Western countries. The purpose of this study is to critically assess the actual conditions for patients’ involvement in healthcare practice in Greenland and to point to possibilities for development. Patients’ perspectives on their own conduct of everyday life with illness and their possibilities for participation when hospitalized are examined in relation to the conditions in a hospital setting dominated by biomedical practice. On a theoretical level, it (...)
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  15.  23
    Patient Advocacy Organizations: Institutional Conflicts of Interest, Trust, and Trustworthiness.Susannah L. Rose - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):680-687.
    Patient advocacy organizations (PAOs) advocate for increased research funding and policy changes and provide services to patients and their families. Given their credibility and political clout, PAOs are often successful in changing policies, increasing research funding, and increasing public awareness of medical conditions and the problems of their constituents. In order to advance their missions, PAOs accept funding, frequently from pharmaceutical firms. Industry funding can help PAOs advance their goals but can also create conflicts of interest (COI). Research indicates (...)
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  16.  15
    Patient Advocacy Organizations: Institutional Conflicts of Interest, Trust, and Trustworthiness.Susannah L. Rose - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):680-687.
    Patient advocacy organizations provide patient- and caregiver-oriented education, advocacy, and support services. PAOs are formally organized nonprofit groups that concern themselves with medical conditions or potential medical conditions and have a mission and take actions that seek to help people affected by those medical conditions or to help their families. Examples of PAOs include the American Cancer Society, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and the American Heart Association. These organizations advocate for, and provide services to, millions of (...)
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  17. Doctors, Patients, and Society Power and Authority in Medical Care.Martin S. Staum, Donald E. Larsen, David J. Roy & Calgary Institute for the Humanities - 1981
     
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  18. For the Patient's Good: The Restoration of Beneficence in Health Care.Edmund D. Pellegrino - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    In this companion volume to their 1981 work, A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice, Pellegrino and Thomasma examine the principle of beneficence and its role in the practice of medicine. Their analysis, which is grounded in a thorough-going philosophy of medicine, addresses a wide array of practical and ethical concerns that are a part of health care decision-making today. Among these issues are the withdrawing and withholding of nutrition and hydration, competency assessment, the requirements for valid surrogate decision-making, quality-of-life determinations, (...)
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  19.  16
    Reconsidering Patient Participation in Guideline Development.Hester M. van de Bovenkamp & Margo J. Trappenburg - 2009 - Health Care Analysis 17 (3):198.
    Health care has become increasingly patient-centred and medical guidelines are considered to be one of the instruments that contribute towards making it so. We reviewed the literature to identify studies on this subject. Both normative and empirical studies were analysed. Many studies recommend active patient participation in the process of guideline development as the instrument to make guidelines more patient-centred. This is done on the assumption that active patient participation will enhance the quality of the guidelines. (...)
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  20.  68
    Patient Autonomy, Clinical Decision Making, and the Phenomenological Reduction.Jonathan Lewis & Søren Holm - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-13.
    Phenomenology gives rise to certain ontological considerations that have far-reaching implications for standard conceptions of patient autonomy in medical ethics, and, as a result, the obligations of and to patients in clinical decision-making contexts. One such consideration is the phenomenological reduction in classical phenomenology, a core feature of which is the characterisation of our primary experiences as immediately and inherently meaningful. This paper builds on and extends the analyses of the phenomenological reduction in the works of Husserl, Heidegger, and (...)
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  21.  9
    Patients’ and Public Views and Attitudes Towards the Sharing of Health Data for Research: A Narrative Review of the Empirical Evidence.Shona Kalkman, Johannes van Delden, Amitava Banerjee, Benoît Tyl, Menno Mostert & Ghislaine van Thiel - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (1):3-13.
    Introduction International sharing of health data opens the door to the study of the so-called ‘Big Data’, which holds great promise for improving patient-centred care. Failure of recent data sharing initiatives indicates an urgent need to invest in societal trust in researchers and institutions. Key to an informed understanding of such a ‘social license’ is identifying the views patients and the public may hold with regard to data sharing for health research. Methods We performed a narrative review of the (...)
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  22.  34
    Patient Perspectives on the Learning Health System: The Importance of Trust and Shared Decision Making.Maureen Kelley, Cyan James, Stephanie Alessi Kraft, Diane Korngiebel, Isabelle Wijangco, Emily Rosenthal, Steven Joffe, Mildred K. Cho, Benjamin Wilfond & Sandra Soo-Jin Lee - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (9):4-17.
    We conducted focus groups to assess patient attitudes toward research on medical practices in the context of usual care. We found that patients focus on the implications of this research for their relationship with and trust in their physicians. Patients view research on medical practices as separate from usual care, demanding dissemination of information and in most cases, individual consent. Patients expect information about this research to come through their physician, whom they rely on to identify and filter associated (...)
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  23. Should Patients with Self–Inflicted Illness Receive Lower Priority in Access to Healthcare Resources.K. Sharkey & L. Gillam - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):661-665.
    The distribution of scarce healthcare resources is an increasingly important issue due to factors such as expensive ‘high tech’ medicine, longer life expectancies and the rising prevalence of chronic illness. Furthermore, in the current healthcare context lifestyle-related factors such as high blood pressure, tobacco use and obesity are believed to contribute significantly to the global burden of disease. As such, this paper focuses on an ongoing debate in the academic literature regarding the role of responsibility for illness in healthcare resource (...)
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  24.  19
    Patient Privacy and Autonomy: A Comparative Analysis of Cases of Ethical Dilemmas in China and the United States.Hui Zhang, Hongmei Zhang, Zhenxiang Zhang & Yuming Wang - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-8.
    Background Respect for patients’ autonomy is usually considered to be an important ethical principle in Western countries; privacy is one of the implications of such respect. Healthcare professionals frequently encounter ethical dilemmas during their practice. The past few decades have seen an increased use of courts to resolve intractable ethical dilemmas across both the developed and the developing world. However, Chinese and American bioethics differ largely due to the influence of Chinese Confucianism and Western religions, respectively, and there is a (...)
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  25.  36
    Patient Dignity and its Related Factors in Heart Failure Patients.H. Bagheri, F. Yaghmaei, T. Ashktorab & F. Zayeri - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (3):316-327.
    Maintenance and promotion of patient dignity is an ethical responsibility of healthcare workers. The aim of this study was to investigate patient dignity and related factors in patients with heart failure. In this qualitative study, 22 patients with heart failure were chosen by purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews were conducted until data saturation. Factors related to patient dignity were divided into two main categories: patient/care index and resources. Intrapersonal features (inherent characteristics and individual beliefs) and interpersonal (...)
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  26. Patient Advocacy in Clinical Ethics Consultation.Lisa M. Rasmussen - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):1 - 9.
    The question of whether clinical ethics consultants may engage in patient advocacy in the course of consultation has not been addressed, but it highlights for the field that consultants? allegiances, and the boundaries of appropriate professional practice, must be better understood. I consider arguments for and against patient advocacy in clinical ethics consultation, which demonstrate that patient advocacy is permissible, but not central to the practice of consultation. I then offer four recommendations for consultants who engage in (...)
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  27. Patients as Consumers of Health Care in South Africa: The Ethical and Legal Implications. [REVIEW]Kirsten Rowe & Keymanthri Moodley - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):15.
    South Africa currently has a pluralistic health care system with separate public and private sectors. It is, however, moving towards a socialised model with the introduction of National Health Insurance. The South African legislative environment has changed recently with the promulgation of the Consumer Protection Act and proposed amendments to the National Health Act. Patients can now be viewed as consumers from a legal perspective. This has various implications for health care systems, health care providers and the doctor-patient relationship.
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  28.  55
    Patient Autonomy for the Management of Chronic Conditions: A Two-Component Re-Conceptualization.Aanand D. Naik, Carmel B. Dyer, Mark E. Kunik & Laurence B. McCullough - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):23 – 30.
    The clinical application of the concept of patient autonomy has centered on the ability to deliberate and make treatment decisions (decisional autonomy) to the virtual exclusion of the capacity to execute the treatment plan (executive autonomy). However, the one-component concept of autonomy is problematic in the context of multiple chronic conditions. Adherence to complex treatments commonly breaks down when patients have functional, educational, and cognitive barriers that impair their capacity to plan, sequence, and carry out tasks associated with chronic (...)
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  29.  55
    Doctors, Patients, and Nudging in the Clinical Context—Four Views on Nudging and Informed Consent.Thomas Ploug & Søren Holm - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (10):28-38.
    In an analysis of recent work on nudging we distinguish three positions on the relationship between nudging founded in libertarian paternalism and the protection of personal autonomy through informed consent. We argue that all three positions fail to provide adequate protection of personal autonomy in the clinical context. Acknowledging that nudging may be beneficial, we suggest a fourth position according to which nudging and informed consent are valuable in different domains of interaction.
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  30.  2
    The Patient in the Family an Ethics of Medicine and Families.Hilde Lindemann Nelson, Hilde Lindemann & James Lindemann Nelson - 1995 - Routledge.
    The Patient in the Family diagnoses the ways in which the worlds of home and hospital misunderstand each other. The authors explore how medicine, through its new reproductive technologies, is altering the structure of families, how families can participate more fully in medical decision-making, and how to understand the impact on families when medical advances extend life but not vitality.
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  31.  25
    Harmony Search Algorithm for Patient Admission Scheduling Problem.Iyad Abu Doush, Mohammed Azmi Al-Betar, Mohammed A. Awadallah, Abdelaziz I. Hammouri, Ra’ed M. Al-Khatib, Saba ElMustafa & Habes ALkhraisat - 2019 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 29 (1):540-553.
    The patient admission scheduling problem is an optimization problem in which we assign patients automatically to beds for a specific period of time while preserving their medical requirements and their preferences. In this paper, we present a novel solution to the PAS problem using the harmony search algorithm. We tailor the HS to solve the PAS problem by distributing patients to beds randomly in the harmony memory while respecting all hard constraints. The proposed algorithm uses five neighborhood strategies in (...)
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  32.  23
    Patients' Privacy and Satisfaction in the Emergency Department: A Descriptive Analytical Study.N. D. Nayeri & M. Aghajani - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (2):167-177.
    Respecting privacy and patients’ satisfaction are amongst the main indicators of quality of care and one of the basic goals of health services. This study, carried out in 2007, aimed to investigate the extent to which patient privacy is observed and its correlation with patient satisfaction in three emergency departments of Tehran University of Medical Science, Iran. Questionnaire data were collected from a convenience sample of 360 patients admitted to emergency departments and analysed using SPSS software. The results (...)
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  33.  47
    Patient Decision Making Competence: Outlines of a Conceptual Analysis. [REVIEW]Jos V. M. Welie & Sander P. K. Welie - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (2):127-138.
    In order to protect patients against medical paternalism, patients have been granted the right to respect of their autonomy. This right is operationalized first and foremost through the phenomenon of informed consent. If the patient withholds consent, medical treatment, including life-saving treatment, may not be provided. However, there is one proviso: The patient must be competent to realize his autonomy and reach a decision about his own care that reflects that autonomy. Since one of the most important (...) rights hinges on the patient's competence, it is crucially important that patient decision making incompetence is clearly defined and can be diagnosed with the greatest possible degree of sensitivity and, even more important, specificity. Unfortunately, the reality is quite different. There is little consensus in the scientific literature and even less among clinicians and in the law as to what competence exactly means, let alone how it can be diagnosed reliably. And yet, patients are deemed incompetent on a daily basis, losing the right to respect of their autonomy. In this article, we set out to fill that hiatus by beginning at the very beginning, the literal meaning of the term competence. We suggest a generic definition of competence and derive four necessary conditions of competence. We then transpose this definition to the health care context and discuss patient decision making competence. (shrink)
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  34.  18
    Patient Participation in Hospital Care: How Equal is the Voice of the Client Council?Hanneke van der Meide, Gert Olthuis & Carlo Leget - 2015 - Health Care Analysis 23 (3):238-252.
    Patient participation in healthcare is highly promoted for democratic reasons. Older patients make up a large part of the hospital population but their voices are less easily heard by most patient participation instruments. The client council can be seen as an important medium to represent the interests of this increasing group of patients. Every Dutch healthcare institution is obliged to have a client council and its rights are legally established. This paper reports on a case study of a (...)
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  35. The Patient as Partner: A Theory of Human Experimentation Ethics.Robert Veatch - 1988 - Journal of Religious Ethics 16 (1):190-190.
     
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  36.  1
    Patient Engagement, Involvement, or Participation — Entrapping Concepts in Nurse‐Patient Interactions: A Critical Discussion.Teresa A. Jerofke-Owen, Georgia Tobiano & Ann C. Eldh - forthcoming - Nursing Inquiry.
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  37.  7
    The Patient and Clinician Experience of Informed Consent for Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Qualitative Evidence.L. J. Convie, E. Carson, D. McCusker, R. S. McCain, N. McKinley, W. J. Campbell, S. J. Kirk & M. Clarke - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-17.
    Background Informed consent is an integral component of good medical practice. Many researchers have investigated measures to improve the quality of informed consent, but it is not clear which techniques work best and why. To address this problem, we propose developing a core outcome set to evaluate interventions designed to improve the consent process for surgery in adult patients with capacity. Part of this process involves reviewing existing research that has reported what is important to patients and doctors in the (...)
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  38.  68
    Patients' Dignity in a Rehabilitation Ward: Ethical Challenges for Nursing Staff.Aase Stabell & Dagfinn Nåden - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (3):236-248.
    The purpose of this study was to explore the challenges met by nursing staff in a rehabilitation ward. The overall design was qualitative: data were derived from focus interviews with groups of nurses and analyzed from a phenomenological-hermeneutic perspective. The main finding was that challenges emerge on two levels of ethics and rationality: an economic/administrative level and a level of care. An increase in work-load and the changing potential for patient rehabilitation influence the care that nurses can provide in (...)
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  39.  31
    Certified Patient Decision Aids: Solving Persistent Problems with Informed Consent Law.Thaddeus Mason Pope - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (1):12-40.
    The legal doctrine of informed consent has overwhelmingly failed to assure that the medical treatment patients get is the treatment patients want. This Article describes and defends an ongoing shift toward shared decision making processes incorporating the use of certified patient decision aids.
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  40.  8
    Patients Living With Breast Cancer During the Coronavirus Pandemic: The Role of Family Resilience, Coping Flexibility, and Locus of Control on Affective Responses.Eleonora Brivio, Paolo Guiddi, Ludovica Scotto, Alice V. Giudice, Greta Pettini, Derna Busacchio, Florence Didier, Ketti Mazzocco & Gabriella Pravettoni - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has strongly affected oncology patients. Many screening and treatment programs have been postponed or canceled, and such patients also experience fear of increased risk of exposure to the virus. In many cases, locus of control, coping flexibility, and perception of a supportive environment, specifically family resilience, can allow for positive emotional outcomes for individuals managing complex health conditions like cancer. This study aims to determine if family resilience, coping flexibility, and locus of control can mitigate (...)
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  41.  15
    The Patient’s Dignity From the Nurse’s Perspective.Katarina Bredenhof Heijkenskjöld, Mirjam Ekstedt & Lillemor Lindwall - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (3):313-324.
    The aim of this study was to understand how nurses experience patients’ dignity in Swedish medical wards. A hermeneutic approach and Flanagan’s critical incident technique were used for data collection. Twelve nurses took part in the study. The data were analysed using hermeneutic text interpretation. The findings show that the nurses who wanted to preserve patients’ dignity by seeing them as fellow beings protected the patients by stopping other nurses from performing unethical acts. They regard patients as fellow human beings, (...)
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  42.  41
    Involving Patients and Relatives in a Norwegian Clinical Ethics Committee: What Have We Learned?Reidun Førde & Thor Willy Ruud Hansen - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (3):125-130.
    To date, few Norwegian clinical ethics committees (CECs) have included patients or next of kin in case discussions. In 2008, Rikshospitalet's (The National Hospital's) CEC began to routinely invite patients and relatives into case discussions. In this paper, we describe seven cases discussed by this committee in 2008. Six involved life and death decision-making in collaboration with the next of kin, while one related case did not include relatives. In our opinion, representing the patient's perspective was advantageous to the (...)
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  43.  54
    Patient Autonomy and Choice in Healthcare: Self-Testing Devices as a Case in Point.Anna-Marie Greaney, Dónal P. O’Mathúna & P. Anne Scott - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):383-395.
    This paper aims to critique the phenomenon of advanced patient autonomy and choice in healthcare within the specific context of self-testing devices. A growing number of self-testing medical devices are currently available for home use. The premise underpinning many of these devices is that they assist individuals to be more autonomous in the assessment and management of their health. Increased patient autonomy is assumed to be a good thing. We take issue with this assumption and argue that self-testing (...)
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  44. Shared Decision-Making and Patient Autonomy.Lars Sandman & Christian Munthe - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (4):289-310.
    In patient-centred care, shared decision-making is advocated as the preferred form of medical decision-making. Shared decision-making is supported with reference to patient autonomy without abandoning the patient or giving up the possibility of influencing how the patient is benefited. It is, however, not transparent how shared decision-making is related to autonomy and, in effect, what support autonomy can give shared decision-making. In the article, different forms of shared decision-making are analysed in relation to five different aspects (...)
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  45.  25
    Patient Complaints in Finland 2000-2004: A Retrospective Register Study.L. Kuosmanen, R. Kaltiala-Heino, S. Suominen, J. Karkkainen, H. Hatonen, S. Ranta & M. Valimaki - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):788-792.
    Today, monitoring of patient complaints in healthcare services is being used as a tool for quality assurance systems and in the future development of services. This nationwide register study describes the number of all complaints processed, number of complaints between different state provinces, healthcare services and healthcare professionals, and outcomes of complaints in Finland during the period 2000–2004. All complaints processed at the State Provincial Offices and the National Authority for Medicolegal Affairs were analysed by statistical methods. Complaints about (...)
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  46.  10
    Knowing Patients: Turning Patient Knowledge Into Science.Jeannette Pols - 2014 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 39 (1):73-97.
    Science and technology studies concerned with the study of lay influence on the sciences usually analyze either the political or the normative epistemological consequences of lay interference. Here I frame the relation between patients, knowledge, and the sciences by opening up the question: How can we articulate the knowledge that patients develop and use in their daily lives and make it transferable and useful to others, or, `turn it into science’? Elsewhere, patient knowledge is analyzed either as essentially different (...)
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  47.  9
    Pharmaceutical Freedom: Why Patients Have a Right to Self Medicate.Jessica Flanigan - 2017 - Oup Usa.
    Jessica Flanigan defends patients' rights of self-medication on the grounds that same moral reasons against medical paternalism in clinical contexts are also reasons against paternalistic pharmaceutical policies, including prohibitive approval processes and prescription requirements.
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  48. Patient-Funded Trials: Opportunity or Liability?Danielle M. Wenner, Alex John London & Jonathan Kimmelman - 2015 - Cell Stem Cell 17 (2):135-137.
    Patient-funded trials are gaining traction as a means of accelerating clinical translation. However, such trials sidestep mechanisms that promote rigor, relevance, efficiency, and fairness. We recommend that funding bodies or research institutions establish mechanisms for merit review of patient-funded trials, and we offer some basic criteria for evaluating PFT protocols.
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  49.  57
    Patients' Perception of Dignity in Iranian Healthcare Settings: A Qualitative Content Analysis: Table 1.Hossein Ebrahimi, Camellia Torabizadeh, Eesa Mohammadi & Sousan Valizadeh - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (12):723-728.
    Next SectionPurpose The importance of recognising patient dignity has been realised in recent years. Despite being a central phenomenon in medicine, dignity is a controversial concept, the definition of which in healthcare centres is influenced by a multitude of factors. The aim of this study was to explore the perspective of Iranian patients on respect for their dignity in healthcare centres. Methods With the use of purposeful sampling, 20 patients were interviewed over an 11-month period in three educational hospitals (...)
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  50. Patients’ Priorities for Surrogate Decision-Making: Possible Influence of Misinformed Beliefs.E. J. Jardas, Robert Wesley, Mark Pavlick, David Wendler & Annette Rid - 2022 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 13 (3):137-151.
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