Results for 'Charlotte Williamson'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  2
    Towards the Emancipation of Patients: Patients' Experiences and the Patient Movement.Charlotte Williamson - 2010 - Policy Press.
    This highly original book examines, for the first time, how the patient movement, which works to improve the quality of healthcare, can actually be considered an emancipation movement when led by its radical elements.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2. Center, Charlotte, NC, and chairman of the Philosophy Departmnt, Davidson College, Durham, NC.Charlotte Memorial Hosptul - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  4
    Collected Works of Charlotte Wolff.Charlotte Wolff - 2015 - Routledge.
    Charlotte Wolff was born in Riesenburg, West Prussia into a middle-class Jewish family. She studied philosophy and then medicine at several German universities, completing her doctorate in Berlin in 1926. Working in various institutions over the next few years, she was also interested in psychotherapy and had a small private medical and psychotherapeutic practice. In 1933 she was forced to leave Germany because of the Nazi regime, and settled for a few years in Paris. As a German refugee she (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Williamson's Philosophy of Philosophy Reply.Timothy Williamson - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):534-542.
  5.  13
    Williamson on the A Priori and the Analytic Reply.Timothy Williamson - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):498-506.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Modality & Other Matters: An Interview with Timothy Williamson.Timothy Williamson & Paal Antonsen - 2010 - Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):16-29.
    An interview with Timothy Williamson on Modality and other matters. Williams is asked three main questions: the first about the difference between philosophical and non-philosophical knowledge, the second concerns the epistemology of modality, and the third is on the emerging metaphysical picture.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  9
    A Bayesian Account of Establishing.Jon Williamson - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    When a proposition is established, it can be taken as evidence for other propositions. Can the Bayesian theory of rational belief and action provide an account of establishing? I argue that it can, but only if the Bayesian is willing to endorse objective constraints on both probabilities and utilities, and willing to deny that it is rationally permissible to defer wholesale to expert opinion. I develop a new account of deference that accommodates this latter requirement.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. The philosophy of philosophy • by Timothy Williamson • Blackwell, 2007. X + 332 pp. £ 15.99 paper: Summary. [REVIEW]Timothy Williamson - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):99-100.
    The book is primarily an essay on the epistemology of the sort of armchair knowledge that we can hope to achieve in philosophy. The possibility of such knowledge is not to be explained by reinterpreting philosophical questions as questions about words or concepts. Although there are philosophical questions about words and concepts, most philosophical questions are not about words or concepts: they are, just as they seem to be, about the things, many of them independent of us, to which the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. Williamson on Knowledge.Duncan Pritchard & Patrick Greenough (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Eighteen leading philosophers offer critical assessments of Timothy Williamson's ground-breaking work on knowledge and its impact on philosophy today. They discuss epistemological issues concerning evidence, defeasibility, scepticism, testimony, assertion, and perception, and debate Williamson's central claim that knowledge is a mental state.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  10. Williamson on Counterpossibles.Berto Francesco, David Ripley, Graham Priest & Rohan French - 2018 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 47 (4):693-713.
    A counterpossible conditional is a counterfactual with an impossible antecedent. Common sense delivers the view that some such conditionals are true, and some are false. In recent publications, Timothy Williamson has defended the view that all are true. In this paper we defend the common sense view against Williamson’s objections.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  11. Williamson on Indicatives and Suppositional Heuristics.Franz Berto - 2022 - Synthese (1):1-12.
    Timothy Williamson has defended the claim that the semantics of the indicative ‘if’ is given by the material conditional. Putative counterexamples can be handled by better understanding the role played in our assessment of indicatives by a fallible cognitive heuristic, called the Suppositional Procedure. Williamson’s Suppositional Conjecture has it that the Suppositional Procedure is humans’ primary way of prospectively assessing conditionals. This paper raises some doubts on the Suppositional Procedure and Conjecture.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  53
    The lost worlds of German orientalism: George S. Williamson.George S. Williamson - 2012 - Modern Intellectual History 9 (3):699-711.
    The opening lines of Franz Delitzsch's Babel und Bibel offer an unusually frank confession of the personal and psychological motives that animated German orientalism in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. For Delitzsch and countless others like him, orientalist scholarship provided an opportunity not just to expand their knowledge of the Near East and India, but also to explore the world of the Bible and, in doing so, effect a reckoning with the religious beliefs of their childhoods. In German Orientalism (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  67
    Thinking Deeply, Contributing Originally: An Interview with Timothy Williamson (Special Contribution).Timothy Williamson, B. O. Chen & Koji Nakatogawa - 2009 - Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 18:57-87.
  14.  42
    The Philosophy of Philosophy * By Timothy Williamson * BLACKWELL, 2007. x + 332 pp. 15.99 paper: Summary. [REVIEW]Timothy Williamson - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):99-100.
    The book is primarily an essay on the epistemology of the sort of armchair knowledge that we can hope to achieve in philosophy. The possibility of such knowledge is not to be explained by reinterpreting philosophical questions as questions about words or concepts. Although there are philosophical questions about words and concepts, most philosophical questions are not about words or concepts: they are, just as they seem to be, about the things, many of them independent of us, to which the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Williamson on Gettier Cases and Epistemic Logic.Stewart Cohen & Juan Comesaña - 2013 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 56 (1):15-29.
    Timothy Williamson has fruitfully exploited formal resources to shed considerable light on the nature of knowledge. In the paper under examination, Williamson turns his attention to Gettier cases, showing how they can be motivated formally. At the same time, he disparages the kind of justification he thinks gives rise to these cases. He favors instead his own notion of justification for which Gettier cases cannot arise. We take issue both with his disparagement of the kind of justification that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  16. Williamson on Knowledge and Evidence.Alvin Goldman - 2009 - In Patrick Greenough, Duncan Pritchard & Timothy Williamson (eds.), Williamson on Knowledge. Oxford University Press. pp. 73-91.
    Timothy Williamson’s project in Knowledge and Its Limits (Williamson, 2000)1 includes proposals for substantial revisions in the received approach to epistemology. One received view is that knowledge is conceptualized in terms of a conjunction of factors that are individually necessary and jointly sufficient for knowing. A central aim of epistemology is to state such necessary and sufficient conditions. Against this received view, Williamson argues that a necessary but insufficient condition need not be a conjunct of a non-circular (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  17. Why Williamson should be a sceptic.Dylan Dodd - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (229):635–649.
    Timothy Williamson's epistemology leads to a fairly radical version of scepticism. According to him, all knowledge is evidence. It follows that if S knows p, the evidential probability for S that p is 1. I explain Williamson's infallibilist account of perceptual knowledge, contrasting it with Peter Klein's, and argue that Klein's account leads to a certain problem which Williamson's can avoid. Williamson can allow that perceptual knowledge is possible and that all knowledge is evidence, while at (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  18. Knowledge and Its Limits.Timothy Williamson - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (210):105-116.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1239 citations  
  19.  3
    Six Metaphysical Poets: A Reader's Guide.George Williamson - 2001 - Syracuse University Press.
    "This guide focuses primarily on the sometimes difficult or obscure poetry of John Donne, George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, Abraham Cowley, Henry Vaughan, and Andrew Marvell, but it also deals with some of the lesser poets who can legitimately be included under the heading of metaphysical poets. Because this poetry is rich in philosophical ideas and metaphors, George Williamson helps the reader to understand the line-by-line meaning of particular poems before being bid to set out on a path to higher (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Williamson on the A Priori and the Analytic. [REVIEW]Paul Boghossian - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):488-497.
    This essay criticizes Williamson’s attempt, in his book, The Philosophy of Philosophy, to undermine the interest of the a priori–a posteriori distinction. Williamson’s argument turns on several large claims. The first is that experience often plays a role intermediate between evidential and merely enabling, and that this poses a difficulty for giving a theoretically satisfying account of the distinction. The second is that there are no constitutive understanding–assent links. Both of these claims are subjected to detailed scrutiny. In (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  21. Motivating Williamson's Model Gettier Cases.Jennifer Nagel - 2013 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 56 (1):54-62.
    Williamson has a strikingly economical way of showing how justified true belief can fail to constitute knowledge: he models a class of Gettier cases by means of two simple constraints. His constraints can be shown to rely on some unstated assumptions about the relationship between reality and appearance. These assumptions are epistemologically non-trivial but can be defended as plausible idealizations of our actual predicament, in part because they align well with empirical work on the metacognitive dimension of experience.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  22. On Williamson and simplicity in modal logic.Theodore Sider - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (4-5):683-698.
    According to Timothy Williamson, we should accept the simplest and most powerful second-order modal logic, and as a result accept an ontology of "bare possibilia". This general method for extracting ontology from logic is salutary, but its application in this case depends on a questionable assumption: that modality is a fundamental feature of the world.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  23.  35
    Williamson on Laws and Progress in Philosophy.Daniel Stoljar - 2019 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 56 (2):37-42.
    Williamson rejects the stereotype that there is progress in science but none in philosophy on the grounds that it assumes that in science progress consists in the discovery of universal laws and that this assumption is false, since in both science and philosophy progress consists at least sometimes in the development of better models. I argue that the assumption is false for a more general reason as well: that progress in both science and philosophy consists in the provision of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  7
    Williamson On the Margins of Knowledge: A Criticism.Ciro De Florio & Vincenzo Fano - forthcoming - Foundations of Science:1-13.
    In this paper, we argue that Williamson’s arguments against luminosity and the KK principle do not work, at least in a scientific context. Both of these arguments are based on the presence of a so-called “buffer zone” between situations in which one is in a position to know p and situations in which one is in a position to know ¬p. In those positions belonging to the buffer zone ¬p holds, but one is not in a position to know (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25. Williamson on Fine on Prior on the reduction of possibilist discourse.Kit Fine - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (4-5):548-570.
    I attempt to meet some criticisms that Williamson makes of my attempt to carry out Prior's project of reducing possibility discourse to actualist discourse.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  26. Williamson on knowledge and psychological explanation.P. D. Magnus & Jonathan Cohen - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 116 (1):37-52.
    According to many philosophers, psychological explanation canlegitimately be given in terms of belief and desire, but not in termsof knowledge. To explain why someone does what they do (so the common wisdom holds) you can appeal to what they think or what they want, but not what they know. Timothy Williamson has recently argued against this view. Knowledge, Williamson insists, plays an essential role in ordinary psychological explanation.Williamson's argument works on two fronts.First, he argues against the claim (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  27. Williamson on inexact knowledge.Anna Mahtani - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 139 (2):171 - 180.
    Timothy Williamson claims that margin for error principles govern all cases of inexact knowledge. I show that this claim is unfounded: there are cases of inexact knowledge where Williamson’s argument for margin for error principles does not go through. The problematic cases are those where the value of the relevant parameter is fixed across close cases. I explore and reject two responses to my objection, before concluding that Williamson’s account of inexact knowledge is not compelling.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  10
    Direct inference and probabilistic accounts of induction.Jon Williamson - forthcoming - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie:1-22.
    Schurz argues that probabilistic accounts of induction fail. In particular, he criticises probabilistic accounts of induction that appeal to direct inference principles, including subjective Bayesian approaches and objective Bayesian approaches. In this paper, I argue that Schurz’ preferred direct inference principle, namely Reichenbach’s Principle of the Narrowest Reference Class, faces formidable problems in a standard probabilistic setting. Furthermore, the main alternative direct inference principle, Lewis’ Principal Principle, is also hard to reconcile with standard probabilism. So, I argue, standard probabilistic approaches (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Philosophical knowledge and knowledge of counterfactuals.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 74 (1):89-123.
    Metaphysical modalities are definable from counterfactual conditionals, and the epistemology of the former is a special case of the epistemology of the latter. In particular, the role of conceivability and inconceivability in assessing claims of possibility and impossibility can be explained as a special case of the pervasive role of the imagination in assessing counterfactual conditionals, an account of which is sketched. Thus scepticism about metaphysical modality entails a more far-reaching scepticism about counterfactuals. The account is used to question the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  30.  42
    On Williamson's new Quinean argument against nonclassical logic.Jc Beall - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Logic 16 (7):202.
    In "Semantic paradoxes and abductive methodology", Williamson presents a new Quinean argument based on central ingredients of common pragmatism about theory choice. What makes it new is that, in addition to avoiding Quine's unfortunate charge of mere terminological squabble, Williamson's argument explicitly rejects at least for purposes of the argument Quine's key conservatism premise. In this paper I do two things. First, I argue that Williamson's new Quinean argument implicitly relies on Quine's conservatism principle. Second, by way (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  67
    Charlotte Perkins Gilman: Instrumentalism beyond Dewey.Jane S. Upin - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (2):38 - 63.
    Charlotte Perkins Gilman and John Dewey were both pragmatists who recognized the need to restructure the environment to bring about social progress. Gilman was even more of a pragmatist than Dewey, however, because she addressed problems he did not identify-much less confront. Her philosophy is in accord with the spirit of Dewey's work but in important ways, it is more consistent, more comprehensive and more radical than his instrumentalism.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  32. Williamson's many necessary existents.Theodore Sider - 2009 - Analysis 69 (2):250-258.
    This note is to show that a well-known point about David Lewis’s (1986) modal realism applies to Timothy Williamson’s (1998; 2002) theory of necessary existents as well.1 Each theory, together with certain “recombination” principles, generates individuals too numerous to form a set. The simplest version of the argument comes from Daniel Nolan (1996).2 Assume the following recombination principle: for each cardinal number, ν, it’s possible that there exist ν nonsets. Then given Lewis’s modal realism it follows that there can (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  33.  18
    Plaider l’égalité pour mieux la dépasser : Gabrielle Suchon et l’élévation des femmes.Charlotte Sabourin - 2017 - Philosophiques 44 (2):209-232.
    Charlotte Sabourin | : Cet article se penche sur la contribution de Gabrielle Suchon à la célèbre « querelle des femmes ». J’y démontre que, quoique Suchon défende l’égalité des deux sexes en ce qui a trait à leurs capacités à la liberté, à la science et à l’autorité, elle vise ultimement à montrer que les femmes peuvent se rendre supérieures aux hommes. Je montrerai que son projet d’élévation des femmes ne peut être accompli qu’en soustrayant les femmes à (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34. Timothy Williamson's the philosophy of philosophy.Hilary Kornblith - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):109-116.
    Timothy Williamson's new book, The Philosophy of Philosophy, has a number of central themes. The very idea that philosophy has a method which is different in kind from the sciences is one Williamson rejects. “… the common assumption of philosophical exceptionalism is false. Even the distinction between the a priori and the a posteriori turns out to obscure underlying similarities”. Although Williamson sees the book as “a defense of armchair philosophy”, he also argues that “the differences in (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  3
    Schelling's Ontology of Powers.Charlotte Alderwick - 2021 - Edinburgh University Press.
  36.  47
    Williamson’s Epistemicism and Properties Accounts of Predicates.Paul Teller - manuscript
    If the semantic value of predicates are, as Williamson assumes, properties, then epistemicism is immediate. Epistemicism fails, so also this properties view of predicates. I use examination of Williamsons position as a foil, showing that his two positive arguments for bivalence fail, and that his efforts to rescue epistemicism from obvious problems fail to the point of incoherence. In Part II I argue that, despite the properties view’s problems, it has an important role to play in combinatorial semantics. We (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  48
    Atemporal Essence and Existential Freedom in Schelling.Charlotte Alderwick - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):115-137.
    Although it is clear in Schelling's Freiheitsschrift that he takes an agent's atemporal choice between good and evil to be central to understanding human freedom, there is no consensus in the literature and no adequate account of how to understand this choice. Further, the literature fails to render intelligible how existential freedom is possible in the light of this atemporal choice. I demonstrate that, despite their differences, the dominant accounts in the literature are all guilty of these failings and argue (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  38. Williamson on counterpossibles.Joe Salerno & Berit Brogaard - 2007 - The Reasoner.
    Lewis/Stalnaker semantics has it that all counterpossibles (i.e., counterfactual conditionals with impossible antecedents) are vacuously true. Non-vacuism, by contrast, says the truth-values of counterpossibles are affected by the truth-values of the consequents. Some counterpossibles are true, some false. Williamson objects to non-vacuism. He asks us to consider someone who answered ‘11’ to ‘What is 5 + 7?’ but who mistakenly believes that he answered ‘13’. For the non-vacuist, (1) is false, (2) true: (1) If 5 + 7 were 13, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  39. Timothy Williamson’s Coin-Flipping Argument: Refuted Prior to Publication?Colin Howson - 2021 - Erkenntnis 86 (3):575-583.
    In a well-known paper, Timothy Williamson claimed to prove with a coin-flipping example that infinitesimal-valued probabilities cannot save the principle of Regularity, because on pain of inconsistency the event ‘all tosses land heads’ must be assigned probability 0, whether the probability function is hyperreal-valued or not. A premise of Williamson’s argument is that two infinitary events in that example must be assigned the same probability because they are isomorphic. It was argued by Howson that the claim of isomorphism (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40. Williamson on Knowledge, Action, and Causation.Asbjørn Steglich-Petersen - 2005 - SATS 6 (1):15-28.
    In his Knowledge and its Limits (2000) Timothy Williamson argues that knowledge can be causally efficacious and as such figure in psychological explanation. His argument for this claim figures as a response to a key objection to his overall thesis that knowing is a mental state. In this paper I argue that although Williamson succeeds in establishing that knowledge in some cases is essential to the power of certain causal explanations of actions, he fails to do this in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41. Williamson on the Evidence for Skepticism.John M. DePoe - 2008 - Southwest Philosophical Studies 30:23-32.
    Timothy Williamson has offered a novel approach to refuting external world skepticism in his influential book, Knowledge and Its Limits. The strategy employed by Williamson is to show that skeptics falsely attribute too much self-knowledge to the epistemic agent when they claim that one’s evidence is the same when in a “good case” as it would be in a similar “bad case.” Williamson argues that one’s evidence is not the same in a good case as it would (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  9
    The Mechanisms of Governance.Oliver E. Williamson - 1996 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This book brings together in one place the work of one of our most respected economic theorists, on a field in which he has played a large part in originating: the New Institutional Economics. Transaction cost economics, which studies the governance of contractual relations, is the branch of the New Institutional Economics with which Oliver Williamson is especially associated.Transaction cost economics takes issue with one of the fundamental building blocks in microeconomics: the theory of the firm. Whereas orthodox economics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  43.  92
    Williamson’s Woes.Neil Tennant - 2010 - Synthese 173 (1):9-23.
    This is a reply to Timothy Williamson ’s paper ‘Tennant’s Troubles’. It defends against Williamson ’s objections the anti-realist’s knowability principle based on the author’s ‘local’ restriction strategy involving Cartesian propositions, set out in The Taming of the True. Williamson ’s purported Fitchian reductio, involving the unknown number of books on his table, is analyzed in detail and shown to be fallacious. Williamson ’s attempt to cause problems for the anti-realist by means of a supposed rigid (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44.  5
    Williamson on conditionals and testimony.Karolina Krzyżanowska & Igor Douven - 2023 - Philosophical Studies 180 (1):121-131.
    In _Suppose and Tell_, Williamson makes a new case for the material conditional account. He tries to explain away apparently countervailing data by arguing that these have been misinterpreted because researchers have overlooked the role of heuristics in the processing of conditionals. Cases involving the receipt of apparently conflicting conditionals play an important dialectical role in Williamson’s book: they are supposed to provide evidence for the material conditional account as well as for the defeasibility of a key procedure (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  7
    Perceptions of important outcomes of moral case deliberations: a qualitative study among healthcare professionals in childhood cancer care.Charlotte Weiner, Pernilla Pergert, Bert Molewijk, Anders Castor & Cecilia Bartholdson - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundIn childhood cancer care, healthcare professionals must deal with several difficult moral situations in clinical practice. Previous studies show that morally difficult challenges are related to decisions on treatment limitations, infringing on the child's integrity and growing autonomy, and interprofessional conflicts. Research also shows that healthcare professionals have expressed a need for clinical ethics support to help them deal with morally difficult situations. Moral case deliberations (MCDs) are one example of ethics support. The aim of this study was to describe (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  65
    Williamson's anti-luminosity argument.Brueckner Anthony - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 110 (3):285-293.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  47.  60
    On Williamson's Account of Propositional Evidence.Artūrs Logins - 2013 - Logique Et Analyse 56 (223):347-354.
    In this paper I examine Williamson’s (2000) claim that all evidence is propositional. I propose to reject this claim. I give two objections to two premises of Williamson’s argument. The first is a critique of Williamson’s claim that we choose between hypotheses on the basis of our evidence. The second objection is that Williamson’s claim that evidence is an explanandum of an hypothesis leads to counter-intuitive consequences and thus is not central to what evidence is, at (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48. Embodied remembering.Kellie Williamson & John Sutton - 2014 - In L. A. Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge. pp. 315--325.
    Experiences of embodied remembering are familiar and diverse. We settle bodily into familiar chairs or find our way easily round familiar rooms. We inhabit our own kitchens or cars or workspaces effectively and comfortably, and feel disrupted when our habitual and accustomed objects or technologies change or break or are not available. Hearing a particular song can viscerally bring back either one conversation long ago, or just the urge to dance. Some people explicitly use their bodies to record, store, or (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  49.  85
    Substance and Essence in Aristotle: An Interpretation of Metaphysics Vii-Ix.Charlotte Witt - 1989 - Cornell University Press.
    Charlotte Witt extracts from this text a coherent and provocative view about sensible substance by focusing on Aristotle's account of form or essence.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  50.  41
    Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland and the Tradition of the Scientific Utopia.Andrew G. Christensen - 2017 - Utopian Studies 28 (2):286-304.
    Charlotte Perkins Gilman was a prominent and effective figure for social change in her prime, yet, despite her prodigious literary output, she had little direct influence on the generations immediately following her. Even before her death, all of her works were out of print. She has been the subject of increasingly widespread attention since her rediscovery, yet, although she was a stalwart advocate for women's rights, many of Gilman's views make hers a problematic revival. That Gilman has a place (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000