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1492 found
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  1. Bayrak, I., Analgesia and Euthanasia of Animals in Research.T. Altug & C. Karaca - forthcoming - Bioethics Congress.
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  2. Scott Bukatman, Terminal Identity.J. Armitage - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  3. Euthanasia and the Prolongation of Life.Tom L. Beauchamp & L. Walters - forthcoming - Contemporary Issues in Bioethics.
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  4. A Report From Lndia: The Jaina Ethic of Voluntary Death.P. Bilimoria - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  5. Euthanasia in a Welfare State: Experiences From the Review Procedure in the Netherlands.Theo A. Boer - forthcoming - Philosophy Study.
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  6. Editorial: Letting Babies Die.Margaret Brazier & David Archard - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  7. Death and Dying: Euthanasia and Sustaining Life.D. W. Brock & W. T. Reich - forthcoming - Encyclopedia of Bioethics.
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  8. What Does the Chilean Constitution Say About Euthanasia?Íñigo Álvarez Gálvez - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
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  9. The Dutch~ Experience with Euthanasia.Carlos F. Gomez - forthcoming - Bioethics Forum.
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  10. Down the Slippery Slope.Nils Holtug & Human Gene Therapy - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  11. New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.M. Cholbi J. Varelius (ed.) - forthcoming - Springer.
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  12. Euthanasia: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed.Ken Knisely, Michele Carter, John Loughney & Patrick Sullivan - forthcoming - DVD.
    Does each of us have the right to terminate our own existence if we so decide? Can we delegate this task to others? With what methods can we decide these questions? With Michele Carter, John Loughney, and Patrick Sullivan.
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  13. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide.Michael Langford - forthcoming - Christians and Bioethics.
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  14. The Health Care Professional's Role When Active Euthanasia is Sought.Joanne Lynn - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  15. The Continuing Debate Over Active Euthanasia.John H. Pickering - forthcoming - Aba Bioethics Bull., Summer.
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  16. Do Sedation and Analgesia Improve Patientss Satisfaction.Roland Pulanić - forthcoming - Ethics.
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  17. Deconstruction of Discernment in Child Euthanasia.Elia R. G. Pusterla - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-20.
    Belgian law on child euthanasia uses the concept of discernment to bestow the right to die to minors. Jacques Derrida’s deconstruction of oppositional logic grasps the ambiguity of this use of discernment and generally challenges the alleged force of a textual sign meaningfully to differentiate itself from its different and meaningless else. This alleged ability to discern the presence of discernment impinges the truth-value of the distinction between worthy/unworthy lives. The resulting undecidability morally suggests the respect for otherness and promotes (...)
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  18. Controversies Surrounding Continuous Deep Sedation at the End of Life: The Parliamentary and Societal Debates in France.Kasper Raus, Kenneth Chambaere & Sigrid Sterckx - forthcoming - Most Recent Articles: Bmc Medical Ethics.
    Continuous deep sedation at the end of life is a practice that has been the topic of considerable ethical debate, for example surrounding its perceived similarity or dissimilarity with physician-assisted dying...
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  19. Disputes in Bioethics: Abortion, Euthanasia, and Other Controversies.J. Burke Rea - forthcoming - Tandf: The New Bioethics:1-4.
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  20. Disputes in Bioethics: Abortion, Euthanasia, and Other Controversies.J. Burke Rea - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-4.
    In Disputes in Bioethics: Abortion, Euthanasia, and Other Controversies, Christopher Kaczor presents a series of his previously published articles addressing recent scholarship in bioethics. As suc...
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  21. The Role of a Mobile Palliative Care Team in the Field of Clinical Ethics.Marie-Sylvie Richard & Jean-Michel Lassaunière - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  22. Dying with Dignity, and Euthanasia: A View From the Netherlands.Henriëtte D. Roscam Abbing - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  23. Getting the Facts Right on Dutch Euthanasia.Peter Singer - forthcoming - The Daily Princetonian.
    In opposing the legalization of physician-assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia, Peter Harrell '02 in his April 3 column claims that the example of the Netherlands — so far the only country in the world where both of these practices take place openly and without fear of prosecution — shows that this would be a dangerous course to follow. But none of the evidence that he offers allows him to draw this conclusion.
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  24. Euthanasia and the Law: The California Referendum.Julie Sly - forthcoming - Communicating the Catholic Vision of Life: Proceedings of the Twelfth Bishops' Workshop, Dallas, Texas.
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  25. Belgian Politics in 1985.Jozef Smits - forthcoming - Res Publica.
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  26. How Voluntary is Voluntary Euthanasia?Isaac Van der Sluis - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  27. When Suffering is Unbearable: Physicians, Assisted Suicide, and Euthanasia.John R. Williams - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  28. Aristotle on the Nature and Politics of Medicine.Samuel H. Baker - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):441-449.
    According to Aristotle, the medical art aims at health, which is a virtue of the body, and does so in an unlimited way. Consequently, medicine does not determine the extent to which health should be pursued, and “mental health” falls under medicine only via pros hen predication. Because medicine is inherently oriented to its end, it produces health in accordance with its nature and disease contrary to its nature—even when disease is good for the patient. Aristotle’s politician understands that this (...)
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  29. Why Using Religious Arguments in the Euthanasia Discussion is Problematic.Theodoor A. Boer - 2021 - Revista Latinoamericana de Bioética 21 (1).
    In discussions about assisted dying, those who argue ‘against’ legalisation often reason from a religious angle, whereas those ‘in favour’ adopt a secular stance. The Dutch experience is more nuanced: here, euthanasia advocacy largely originated from protestant religious believers. In this contribution, I criticise the use of religious arguments favouring any specific position. Religion may provide a heuristic context to explore norms relevant in the discussion, and religion may help us formulate our personal stance. But when it comes to societal (...)
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  30. Disability and the Complexity of Choice in the Ethics of Abortion and Voluntary Euthanasia.Shane Clifton - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (4):431-450.
    In the polarized debates about abortion and voluntary euthanasia, disability advocates, who normally align with left-wing social forces, have tended to side with conservative and religious voices in expressing concerns about the impact of technological and sociopolitical developments on disabled futures. This paper draws on the social model of disability and the virtue ethics tradition to explain the alignment between the religious and disability perspectives, and the theory of transformative choice to highlight the limits and biases of the pro-choice logic. (...)
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  31. Living Your Best Life.August Gorman - 2021 - Analysis 81 (3):568-576.
    In Almost Over: Aging, Dying, Dead, Frances Kamm seeks to make sense of people’s widely variant choices about which lives they would choose to continue living. She does this by defending the Prudential Prerogative, which, in analogy to the Moral Prerogative, holds that in a fairly wide range of conditions we are under no intrapersonal rational obligation to choose either to die or to live on. I argue against Kamm's case for the Prudential Prerogative in favor of Life Holism, the (...)
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  32. Medical Assistance in Dying for the Psychiatrically Ill: Reply to Buturovic.Joshua James Hatherley - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):259-260.
  33. Attitudes on Euthanasia Among Medical Students and Doctors in Sri Lanka: A Cross Sectional Study.H. M. M. T. B. Herath, K. W. S. M. Wijayawardhana, U. I. Wickramarachchi & Chaturaka Rodrigo - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-8.
    Background Euthanasia is a topic of intense ethical debate and it is illegal in most countries at present, including Sri Lanka. The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study of medical students and practicing doctors was to explore the acceptance of euthanasia and physician assisted suicide, and factors influencing this opinion. Methods A customised online questionnaire which explored opinions on euthanasia was administered to first and final year medical undergraduates in University of Colombo and practicing doctors with more than 5 years (...)
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  34. Advance Euthanasia Directives and the Dutch Prosecution.Jonathan A. Hughes - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):253-256.
    In a recent Dutch euthanasia case, a woman underwent euthanasia on the basis of an advance directive, having first been sedated without her knowledge and then restrained by members of her family while the euthanasia was administered. This article considers some implications of the criminal court’s acquittal of the doctor who performed the euthanasia. Supporters of advance euthanasia directives have welcomed the judgement as providing a clarification of the law, especially with regard to the admissibility of contextual evidence in interpreting (...)
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  35. Life Worth Living (Rev. Edn).Thaddeus Metz - 2021 - In Filomena Maggino (ed.), Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research, 2nd edn. Springer. pp. 1-4.
    An updated version of this encyclopedia entry on the concept of what, if anything, makes life worthwhile.
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  36. A Step Too Far or a Step in the Wrong Direction? A Critique of the 2014 Amendment to the Belgian Euthanasia Act.Joanna Murdoch - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):103-116.
    In 2014, Article 3 of the the Belgian Euthanasia Act was amended to include the ‘capacity for discernment’ requirement. This paper explores the implications of this highly controversial Amendment. I remain unconvinced of the benefits for children < 12 years old suffering chronic or terminal illnesses. In Part One, I argue that the phrase ‘capacity for discernment’ is problematic and vulnerable to abuse; neither a consistent, widely accepted definition of the phrase has been established nor a standardised method or procedure (...)
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  37. Child Euthanasia and the Church.Thomas Pirog - 2021 - Ethics and Medics 46 (11):1-2.
    The creeping expansion of euthanasia around the world, but especially in the West, is a concern for any moral theologian. This expansion has already reached beyond the elderly into younger and objectively healthier groups, including children. The stance of the Catholic Church is that euthanasia is never permissible and must combat philosophies and laws that support it as fervently as possible.
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  38. Pain, Suffering, and Euthanasia in Insects.Matan Shelomi - 2021 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (1):31-43.
    While unnecessarily killing or injuring an insect is arguably wrong, euthanasia of an accidentally injured insect raises anew issues of whether insects can experience pain. The question takes renewed significance due to increasing insect farming for food and feed and concerns over farmed insect welfare. For euthanasia of a damaged insect to be justifiable, the damage must be sensed as a noxious stimulus that the insect consciously experiences as pain. This pain must then lead to suffering or frustrated desire, with (...)
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  39. Why Do People Want to Die? The Meaning of Life From the Perspective of Euthanasia.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2021 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 90:297-311.
    One way to examine the enigmatic meaningfulness of human life is to ask under which conditions persons ask in earnest for assistance to die, either through euthanasia or physician assisted suicide. The counterpart of intolerable suffering must consist in some form of, however minimal, flourishing that makes people want to go on with their lives, disregarding other reasons to reject assisted dying that have more to do with religious prohibitions. To learn more about why persons want to hasten death during (...)
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  40. Organ Donation After Euthanasia Starting at Home in a Patient with Multiple System Atrophy.Walther van Mook, Jan Bollen, Wim de Jongh, A. Kempener-Deguelle, David Shaw, Elien Pragt, Nathalie van Dijk & Najat Tajaâte - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-6.
    Background A patient who fulfils the due diligence requirements for euthanasia, and is medically suitable, is able to donate his organs after euthanasia in Belgium, the Netherlands and Canada. Since 2012, more than 70 patients have undergone this combined procedure in the Netherlands. Even though all patients who undergo euthanasia are suffering hopelessly and unbearably, some of these patients are nevertheless willing to help others in need of an organ. Organ donation after euthanasia is a so-called donation after circulatory death, (...)
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  41. Autonomy, Voluntariness and Assisted Dying.Ben Colburn - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):316-319.
    Ethical arguments about assisted dying often focus on whether or not respect for an individual’s autonomy gives a reason to offer them an assisted death if they want it. In this paper, I present an argument for legalising assisted dying which appeals to the autonomy of people who don’t want to die. Adding that option can transform the nature of someone’s choice set, enabling them to pursue other options voluntarily where that would otherwise be harder or impossible. This does not (...)
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  42. The Case for an Autonomy-Centred View of Physician-Assisted Death.Jeremy Davis & Eric Mathison - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (3):345-356.
    Most people who defend physician-assisted death (PAD) endorse the Joint View, which holds that two conditions—autonomy and welfare—must be satisfied for PAD to be justified. In this paper, we defend an Autonomy Only view. We argue that the welfare condition is either otiose on the most plausible account of the autonomy condition, or else is implausibly restrictive, particularly once we account for the broad range of reasons patients cite for desiring PAD, such as “tired of life” cases. Moreover, many of (...)
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  43. Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Systematic Review of Medical Students’ Attitudes in the Last 10 Years.Alejandro Gutierrez-Castillo, Javier Gutierrez-Castillo, Francisco Guadarrama-Conzuelo, Amado Jimenez-Ruiz & Jose Luis Ruiz-Sandoval - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine 13.
    This study aimed at examining the approval rate of the medical students’ regarding active euthanasia, passive euthanasia, and physician-assisted-suicide over the last ten years. To do so, the arguments and variables affecting students’ choices were examined and a systematic review was conducted, using PubMed and Web of Science databases, including articles from January 2009 to December 2018. From 135 identified articles, 13 met the inclusion criteria. The highest acceptance rates for euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide were from European countries. The most (...)
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  44. Euthanasia and the Sacred.Michael Kelly - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (1):74.
    For euthanasia the case is deceptively easy to make. When the suffering of others is ended by death we often feel relief. Commonly we accept that animals must sometimes, as the saying goes, be 'put out of their misery'. And, while most people who advocate euthanasia do not rely simply on our revulsion from suffering as though there were no other considerations, the public appeal of their view probably does rest largely on it.
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  45. Is It Possible to Be Better Off Dead? An Epicurean Analysis of Physician-Assisted Suicide.Andrew Pavelich - 2020 - Conatus 5 (2):115.
    Epicurus wrote that death cannot be bad for a person who dies, since when someone dies they no longer exist to be the subject of harm. But his conclusion also applies in the converse: Death cannot be good for someone, since after their death they will not exist to be the subject of benefit. This conclusion is troubling when it is brought to bear on the question of physician assisted suicide. If Epicurus is right, as I think he is, then (...)
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  46. Against Recategorizing Physician-Assisted Suicide.Philip Reed - 2020 - Public Affairs Quarterly 34 (1):50-71.
    There is a growing trend among some physicians, psychiatrists, bioethicists, and other mental health professionals not to treat physician-assisted suicide (PAS) as suicide. The grounds for doing so are that PAS fundamentally differs from other suicides. Perhaps most notably, in 2017 the American Association of Suicidology argued that PAS is distinct from the behavior that their organization seeks to prevent. This paper compares and contrasts suicide and PAS in order to see how much overlap there is. Contrary to the emerging (...)
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  47. Palliative Opioid Use, Palliative Sedation and Euthanasia: Reaffirming the Distinction.Guy Schofield, Idris Baker, Rachel Bullock, Hannah Clare, Paul Clark, Derek Willis, Craig Gannon & Rob George - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):48-50.
    We read with interest the extended essay published from Riisfeldt and are encouraged by an empirical ethics article which attempts to ground theory and its claims in the real world. However, such attempts also have real-world consequences. We are concerned to read the paper’s conclusion that clinical evidence weakens the distinction between euthanasia and normal palliative care prescribing. This is important. Globally, the most significant barrier to adequate symptom control in people with life-limiting illness is poor access to opioid analgesia. (...)
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  48. Will Postmortal Catholics Have “The Right to Die”?Anna Bugajska - 2019 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 24 (2):397-433.
    The article discusses the transhumanist and Catholic perspectives on death and immortality within the speculation on the rise of a postmortal society, and asks the question if Catholics have the right to reject immortalist technologies. To address this problem, I first outline the ideas and technology leading to the rise of a postmortal society, and accept Richard K. Morgan’s Altered Carbon as a counterfactual scenario. Further, the naturalistic and Catholic understandings of death are compared, and it is shown that despite (...)
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  49. A Bioethical Vision.Jason T. Eberl - 2019 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 16 (2):279-293.
    Pope Francis has not put himself at the forefront of tendentious issues in bioethics, such as abortion, human embryonic stem cell research, cloning, contraception, and euthanasia. Nevertheless, his various addresses and magisterial documents such as Evangelii Gaudium and Laudato Si’ make clear that Pope Francis affirms the Church’s teaching on these issues. He has, though, proffered an additional moral lens through which to view such issues, namely, how they factor into the “culture of waste” that informs global society’s “sin of (...)
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  50. The Morality of Euthanasia.Adam Greif - 2019 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 26 (4):612–634.
    In this paper, I defend the view that the requested euthanasia of adults is morally permissible and should be legalised; I use an argument from analogy which compares physician-assisted euthanasia with morally less ambiguous and, in my opinion, an acceptable instance of mercy killing. I also respond to several objections that either try to prove that the instance of mercy killing is not acceptable, or that there is a fundamental difference between these two cases of killing. Furthermore, in the remainder (...)
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