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  1. Disordered faculties: Joseph Raz on euthanasia versus on the amoralist.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    I argue that Joseph Raz’s paper on euthanasia faces a problem of coherence with Joseph Raz’s paper addressing the question of “Why should I be moral?”.
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  2. Euthanasia and well-being: did Joseph Raz change his mind?Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    I identify what appears to be a "glaring" inconsistency between what Joseph Raz says on euthanasia in a 2012 lecture and what he says on well-being within his most celebrated book, The Morality of Freedom. There also appears to be a subtler inconsistency between what he says and his endorsement of H.L.A. Hart’s opposition to a definitional project.
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  3. Bayrak, i., Analgesia and euthanasia of animals in research.T. Altug & C. Karaca - forthcoming - Bioethics Congress.
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  4. Scott Bukatman, Terminal Identity.J. Armitage - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  5. The Extent to Which the Wish to Donate One’s Organs After Death Contributes to Life-Extension Arguments in Favour of Voluntary Active Euthanasia in the Terminally Ill: An Ethical Analysis.Richard C. Armitage - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-29.
    In terminally ill individuals who would otherwise end their own lives, active voluntary euthanasia (AVE) can be seen as life-extending rather than life-shortening. Accordingly, AVE supports key pro-euthanasia arguments (appeals to autonomy and beneficence) and meets certain sanctity of life objections. This paper examines the extent to which a terminally ill individual’s wish to donate organs after death contributes to those life-extension arguments. It finds that, in a terminally ill individual who wishes to avoid experiencing life he considers to be (...)
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  6. Euthanasia and the prolongation of life.Tom L. Beauchamp & L. Walters - forthcoming - Contemporary Issues in Bioethics.
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  7. Euthanasia in a Welfare State: Experiences from the Review Procedure in the Netherlands.Theo A. Boer - forthcoming - Philosophy Study.
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  8. Death and dying: euthanasia and sustaining life.D. W. Brock & W. T. Reich - forthcoming - Encyclopedia of Bioethics.
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  9. Euthanasia in Colombia: Experience in a palliative care program and bioethical reflections.Marcela Erazo-Munoz, Diana Borda-Restrepo & Johana Benavides-Cruz - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    The increased prevalence of advanced‐stage chronic diseases has augmented the need for palliative care teams. In Colombia, although the legislation promotes palliative care development, people still die without receiving management from a palliative care team. In addition, judiciary regulations regarding euthanasia have generated public confusion and ethical conflicts among members of the palliative care teams. Therefore, this study aimed to perform a bioethical reflection on the relationship between palliative care and euthanasia supported by data on euthanasia requests in a palliative (...)
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  10. The Dutch~ Experience with Euthanasia.Carlos F. Gomez - forthcoming - Bioethics Forum.
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  11. Down the Slippery Slope.Nils Holtug & Human Gene Therapy - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  12. Physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia before, during, and after the holocaustPhysician-assisted suicide and euthanasia before, during, and after the holocaust, edited by Sheldon Rubenfeld and Daniel P. Sumasy, with Astrid Ley, pp. 344, Lanham, MD, Lexington Books, 2020, £96 (Hardback), ISBN: 9781793609496. [REVIEW]David Albert Jones - forthcoming - The New Bioethics.
    At the time of writing, a British Member of Parliament has just been suspended from his Party for posting a Tweet in which he compared the level of serious adverse events after vaccination for COVI...
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  13. Physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia before, during, and after the holocaust.David Albert Jones - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-4.
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  14. Euthanasia: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed.Ken Knisely, Michele Carter, John Loughney & Patrick Sullivan - forthcoming - DVD.
    Does each of us have the right to terminate our own existence if we so decide? Can we delegate this task to others? With what methods can we decide these questions? With Michele Carter, John Loughney, and Patrick Sullivan.
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  15. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide.Michael Langford - forthcoming - Christians and Bioethics.
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  16. The Role of Hospice and Palliative Medicine in the Ars Moriendi.Durham Levi - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    There is disagreement among physicians and medical ethicists on the precise goals of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (HPM). Some think that HPM's goals should differ from those of other branches of medicine and aim primarily at lessening pain, discomfort, and confusion; while others think that HPM's practices should, like all other branches of medicine, aim at promoting health. I take the latter position: using the ars moriendi to set a standard for what it means to die well, I argue that (...)
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  17. The health care professional's role when active euthanasia is sought.Joanne Lynn - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  18. Nursing students’ attitude toward euthanasia following its legalization in Spain.Antonia Arreciado Marañón, Rosa García-Sierra, Xavier Busquet-Duran, Gloria Tort-Nasarre & Maria Feijoo-Cid - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics.
    Background Euthanasia is a controversial practice in many countries. Since Spain’s Euthanasia Law came into effect on March 24, 2021, healthcare providers have faced a new challenge since they must inform patients, provide care, accompany them, and implement the law. It also represents a new stumbling block at universities, which must adapt to regulatory changes and educate future professionals accordingly. Little is known about the attitude of nursing students in Spain toward euthanasia since this law was implemented. Objective This study (...)
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  19. Double Effect Donation or Bodily Respect? A "Third Way" Response to Camosy and Vukov.Anthony McCarthy & Helen Watt - forthcoming - Linacre Quarterly:1-17.
    Is it possible to donate unpaired vital organs, foreseeing but not intending one’s own death? We argue that this is indeed psychologically possible, and thus far agree with Charles Camosy and Joseph Vukov in their recent paper on “double effect donation.” Where we disagree with these authors is that we see double-effect donation not as a morally praiseworthy act akin to mar- tyrdom but as a morally impermissible act that necessarily disrespects human bodily integrity. Respect for bodily integrity goes beyond (...)
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  20. The Continuing Debate over Active Euthanasia.John H. Pickering - forthcoming - Aba Bioethics Bull., Summer.
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  21. Controversies surrounding continuous deep sedation at the end of life: the parliamentary and societal debates in France.Kasper Raus, Kenneth Chambaere & Sigrid Sterckx - forthcoming - Most Recent Articles: Bmc Medical Ethics.
    Continuous deep sedation at the end of life is a practice that has been the topic of considerable ethical debate, for example surrounding its perceived similarity or dissimilarity with physician-assisted dying...
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  22. Disputes in Bioethics: Abortion, Euthanasia, and Other Controversies by Christopher Kaczor. [REVIEW]J. Burke Rea - forthcoming - Tandf: The New Bioethics:1-4.
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  23. The role of a mobile palliative care team in the field of clinical ethics.Marie-Sylvie Richard & Jean-Michel Lassaunière - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  24. Dying with dignity, and euthanasia: A view from the Netherlands.Henriëtte D. Roscam Abbing - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  25. Getting the Facts Right on Dutch Euthanasia.Peter Singer - forthcoming - The Daily Princetonian.
    In opposing the legalization of physician-assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia, Peter Harrell '02 in his April 3 column claims that the example of the Netherlands — so far the only country in the world where both of these practices take place openly and without fear of prosecution — shows that this would be a dangerous course to follow. But none of the evidence that he offers allows him to draw this conclusion.
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  26. Euthanasia and the law: The california referendum.Julie Sly - forthcoming - Communicating the Catholic Vision of Life: Proceedings of the Twelfth Bishops' Workshop, Dallas, Texas.
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  27. Why the irremediability requirement is not sufficient to deny psychiatric euthanasia for patients with treatment-resistant depression.Marcus T. L. Teo - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) holds centrality in many debates regarding psychiatric euthanasia. Among the strongest reasons cited by opponents of psychiatric euthanasia is the uncertainty behind the irremediability of psychiatric illnesses. According to this argument, conditions that cannot be considered irremediable imply that there are possible remedies that remain for the condition. If there are possible remedies that remain for the condition, then patients with that condition cannot be considered for access to euthanasia. I call this the irremediability requirement (IR). I (...)
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  28. Decision-making process regarding passive euthanasia: Theory of planned behavior framework.Ronit Tsemach & Anat Amit Aharon - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics.
    Background Nurses have an essential role in caring for end-of-life patients. Nevertheless, the nurse’s involvement in the passive euthanasia decision-making process is insufficient and lower than expected. Objectives To explore factors associated with nurses’ intention to be involved in non-treatment decisions (NTD) regarding passive euthanasia decision-making versus their involvement in the palliative care of patients requesting euthanasia, using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) framework. Design A cross-sectional study utilizing a random sample. Participants and research context The study was conducted (...)
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  29. How voluntary is voluntary euthanasia?Isaac Van der Sluis - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  30. When suffering is unbearable: Physicians, assisted suicide, and euthanasia.John R. Williams - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  31. Euthanasia in human beings versus companion animals.Shené Jheanne de Rijk - 2024 - South African Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):57-69.
    This article argues in favour of voluntary active euthanasia in human beings on the grounds that we (society in general) perform euthanasia on valued companion animals when their suffering is considered great. I argue that suffering is a morally relevant criterion that should be considered in all cases (human and animal) of euthanasia. I further argue that human beings possess autonomy, a morally relevant difference to companion animals, that allows them to reason about their futures in a way that animals (...)
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  32. James Rachels and the morality of euthanasia.Timothy J. Furlan - 2024 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 45 (2):69-97.
    My fundamental thesis is that Rachels dismisses the traditional Western account of the morality of killing without offering a viable replacement. In this regard, I will argue that the substitute account he offers is deficient in at least eight regards: (1) he fails to justify the foundational principle of utilitarianism, (2) he exposes preference utilitarianism to the same criticisms he lodges against classical utilitarianism, (3) he neglects to explain how precisely one performs the maximization procedure which preference utilitarianism requires, (4) (...)
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  33. The Strange Implications for Bioethics of Taking Christianity Seriously.Stephen Kershnar - 2024 - Sophia 63 (1).
    In this paper, I argue for two theses. First, if Christianity is true, then morality should depend on the metaphysics of the afterlife. Second, if Christianity is true, then contemporary moral theory is mistaken. The argument for the first thesis rests on two premises. If rightness depends on an act’s effects on an individual, then—at least in part—it depends on the long-term effects on him. If rightness depends—at least in part—on the long-term effects on an individual, then it depends on (...)
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  34. Giving the terminally ill access to euthanasia is not discriminatory: a response to Reed.Jordan MacKenzie - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (2):123-123.
    Philip Reed argues that laws that grant people access to euthanasia on the basis of terminal illness are discriminatory. In support of this claim, he offers an argument by analogy: it would be discriminatory to offer a person access to euthanasia because they are women or because they are disabled, as such restricted access would send the message ‘that life as a woman or as a disabled person is (very often) not worth living’.1 And so it must also be discriminatory (...)
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  35. The difficult path to euthanasia in Ecuador: A call for actions for other nations.Esteban Ortiz-Prado, Jorge Vasconez-Gonzalez & Juan S. Izquierdo-Condoy - 2024 - Developing World Bioethics 24 (2):52-53.
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  36. Physicians’ views on the role of relatives in euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide decision-making: a mixed-methods study among physicians in the Netherlands.H. Roeline Pasman, Agnes van der Heide, Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & Sophie C. Renckens - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundRelatives have no formal position in the practice of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (EAS) according to Dutch legislation. However, research shows that physicians often involve relatives in EAS decision-making. It remains unclear why physicians do (not) want to involve relatives. Therefore, we examined how many physicians in the Netherlands involve relatives in EAS decision-making and explored reasons for (not) involving relatives and what involvement entails.MethodsIn a mixed-methods study, 746 physicians (33% response rate) completed a questionnaire, and 20 were interviewed. The (...)
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  37. Euthanasia, consensual homicide, and refusal of treatment.Eduardo Rivera-López - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):292-299.
    Consensual homicide remains a crime in jurisdictions where active voluntary euthanasia has been legalized. At the same time, both jurisdictions, in which euthanasia is legal and those in which it is not, recognize that all patients (whether severely ill or not) have the right to refuse or withdraw medical treatment (including life-saving treatment). In this paper, I focus on the tensions between these three norms (the permission of active euthanasia, the permission to reject life-saving treatment, and the prohibition of consensual (...)
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  38. Euthanasia and assisted suicide: Who are the vulnerable?Meta Rus & Chris Gastmans - 2024 - Clinical Ethics 19 (1):18-25.
    One of the common domains in health care in which the concept of vulnerability is used is end-of-life care, including euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS). Since different uses and implications of the notion have been recognised in the literature on EAS, this paper aims to analyse them and reflect on who is the most vulnerable in the context of EAS. A prior exploratory review of the literature has served as a starting point for the discussion. We concluded that vulnerability is (...)
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  39. Euthanasia and End-of-Life Decisions: From the Empirical Turn to Moral Intuitionism.Marta Spranzi - 2024 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 67 (1):73-87.
    ABSTRACT:Most medical learned societies have endorsed both "equivalence" between all forms of withholding or withdrawing treatment and the "discontinuity" between euthanasia and practices to withhold or withdraw treatment. While the latter are morally acceptable insofar as they consist in letting the patient die, the former constitutes an illegitimate act of actively interfering with a patient's life. The moral distinction between killing and letting die has been hotly debated both conceptually and empirically, most notably by experimental philosophers, with inconclusive results. This (...)
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  40. The Prospects of Using AI in Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Legal Exploration.Hannah van Kolfschooten - 2024 - AI and Ethics 1.
    The Netherlands was the first country to legalize euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. This paper offers a first legal perspective on the prospects of using AI in the Dutch practice of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. It responds to the Regional Euthanasia Review Committees’ interest in exploring technological solutions to improve current procedures. The specific characteristics of AI – the capability to process enormous amounts of data in a short amount of time and generate new insights in individual cases – may for (...)
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  41. Preventing the Slide down the Slippery Slope from Assisted Suicide to Euthanasia While Protecting the Rights of People with Disabilities Who Are “Not Dead Yet.”.George J. Annas & Heidi B. Kummer - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (9):20-22.
    Since at least the advent of Jack Kevorkian’s “suicide machine” the major argument against adopting physician-assisted suicide laws has been that they will lead us down a slippery slope to state-sa...
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  42. Legitimation of Euthanasia Decisions: A Philosophical Assessment of the Assisted Life Termination.N. M. Boichenko & N. A. Fialko - 2023 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 24:18-26.
    _The purpose _of this article is to find out whether philosophical and anthropological studies of human nature affect the legitimization of decisions about human life and death, using the example of a philosophical analysis of the problem of euthanasia. _Theoretical__ basis._ Philosophically and anthropologically based situational analysis in bioethics is chosen as the research methodology, which reveals the legitimation of euthanasia as a complex and highly responsible moral decision, which should be based on both the consideration of all the patient’s (...)
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  43. Unbearable Suffering Obviates Euthanasia.La Shun L. Carroll - 2023 - History and Philosophy of Medicine 5 (1):1-7.
    Relying on euthanasia’s definitionally derived set of propositions to provide its purpose, claims, and benefit, we obtain the core concept. Nonetheless, given its core concept, euthanasia is demonstrated to provide no benefit to the animal to justify its use. Euthanasia 1) cannot possibly, and therefore does not, end unbearable suffering, 2) it fails to hasten death, and 3) it, therefore, provides no perceptible relief to the patient. These findings are significant because the argument’s validity does not permit euthanasia to satisfy (...)
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  44. New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia, Second Edition (2nd edition).Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.) - 2023 - Springer.
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  45. The age limit for euthanasia requests in the Netherlands: a Delphi study among paediatric experts.Sedona Celine de Keijzer, Guy Widdershoven, A. A. Eduard Verhagen & H. Roeline Pasman - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (7):458-464.
    BackgroundThe Dutch Euthanasia Act applies to patients 12 years and older, which makes euthanasia for minors younger than 12 legally impossible. The issue under discussion specifically regards the capacity of minors to request euthanasia.ObjectiveGain insight in paediatric experts’ views about which criteria are important to assess capacity, from what age minors can meet those criteria, what an assessment procedure should look like and what role parents should have.MethodsA Delphi study with 16 experts (paediatricians, paediatric nurses and paediatric psychologists) who work (...)
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  46. Medical students’ and residents’ views on euthanasia.Rogério Aparecido Dedivitis, Leandro Luongo de Matos, Mario Augusto Ferrari de Castro, Andrea Anacleto Ferrari de Castro, Renata Rocha Giaxa & Patrícia Zen Tempski - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-9.
    Background Doctors are increasingly faced with end-of-life decisions. Little is known about how medical students approach euthanasia. The objective of this study was to evaluate, among medical students and residents, the view on euthanasia and its variants; correlate such a view with empathy and religiosity/spiritualism; and with the stages of medical training in Brazil. Methods This is an exploratory cross-sectional study using an online questionnaire to be filled out on a voluntary basis among medical students and residents, consisting of: socio-demographic (...)
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  47. What kind of death: the ethics of determining one's own death.Govert den Hartogh - 2023 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    Many books have been published about physician-assisted death. This book offers a comprehensive and in-depth examination of that subject, but it also extends the discussion to a broader range of end-of-life decisions including suicide, palliative care and sedation until death. In every jurisdiction that has laws permitting some kind of physician-assisted death, a central point of controversy is whether such assistance should only be available to dying patients, or to everyone who wants to end his life. The right to determine (...)
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  48. Existential Suffering as a Legitimization of Euthanasia.Jasper Doomen - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (1):14-25.
    Several countries have legalized euthanasia on the basis of medically diagnosable suffering over the last decennial; the criteria to which they adhere differ. The topic of this article is euthanasia on the basis of existential suffering. This article presents a recent proposal to legalize euthanasia for people who experience such suffering and then discusses the issue of what the value of life may be, and whether the standard that life is normally something positive should be accepted. This provides the foundation (...)
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  49. The Ephemeral Self - The Legitimacy of an Advance Euthanasia Directive.Jasper Doomen - 2023 - Medicine, Science and the Law 63 (1).
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  50. How to say goodbye: the wisdom of hospice caregivers.Wendy MacNaughton - 2023 - New York: Bloomsbury Publishing.
    As artist-in-residence at the Zen Hospice Project Guest House, Wendy MacNaughton experienced firsthand how difficult it is to know what to do when we're sharing final moments with a loved one. In this tenderly illustrated guide to saying goodbye, with a foreword by renowned physician and author BJ Miller, MacNaughton shows how to make sure those moments are meaningful. Using a framework of "the five things" taught to her by a professional caregiver, How to Say Goodbye provides a model for (...)
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