Results for 'Maori '

160 found
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  1. Exploring Maori Values.John Patterson - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (1):183-186.
  2.  17
    Maori Wellbeing and Being-in-the-World: Challenging Notions for Psychological Research and Practice in New Zealand.Gabriel Rossouw - 2008 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (2):1-11.
    Psychological research and practice in New Zealand has a long history of a positivist inspired epistemology and a pragmatic evidence-based approach to therapeutic treatment. There is a growing realization that a more meaningful interface between research and practice is required to accommodate indigenous Maori knowledge of wellbeing and living. The dominant Western psychological view in New Zealand of world, time, illness and wellbeing results in practices that do not make sense in cultural terms. The medicalisation and classification of psychological (...)
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  3.  28
    Māori in the Kingdom of the Gaze: Subjects or critics?Carl Mika & Georgina Stewart - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (3).
    For Māori, a real opportunity exists to flesh out some terms and concepts that Western thinkers have adopted and that precede disciplines but necessarily inform them. In this article, we are intent on describing one of these precursory phenomena—Foucault’s Gaze—within a framework that accords with a Māori philosophical framework. Our discussion is focused on the potential and limits of colonised thinking, which has huge implications for such disciplines as education, among others. We have placed Foucault’s Gaze alongside a Māori metaphysics (...)
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  4. Maori environmental virtues.John Patterson - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (4):397-409.
    The standard sources for Maori ethics are the traditional narratives. These depict all things in the environment as sharing a common ancestry, and as thereby required, ideally, to exhibit certain virtues of respect and responsibility for each other. These environmental virtues are expressed in terms of distinctively Maori concepts: respect for mauri and tapu, kaitiakitanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, and environmental balance. I briefly explore these Maori environmental virtues, and draw from them some messages for the world at large.
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  5.  17
    Mäori in the science curriculum: Developments and possibilities.Georgina Stewart - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):851–870.
    The aim of this paper is to examine the current state of development of Mäori science curriculum policy, and the roles that various discourses have played in shaping these developments. These discussions provide a background for suggestions about a possible future direction, and the presentation of a new concept for Mäori science education.
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  6. Maori philosophy: indigenous thinking from Aotearoa.Georgina Stewart - 2020 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book is a concise introduction to Maori philosophy, covering the symbolic systems and worldviews of the indigenous people of Aotearoa, New Zealand. This book addresses core philosophical issues including Maori notions of the self, the world, epistemology, the form in which Maori philosophy is conveyed, and whether or not Maori philosophy has a teleological agenda. The book introduces key texts, thinkers and themes and includes pedagogical features including: - A Maori-to-English glossary; - Accessible English (...)
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  7. Māori concepts of learning and knowledge.Brian Findsen & Lavinia Tamarua - 2007 - In Sharan B. Merriam (ed.), Non-Western Perspectives on Learning and Knowing. Krieger Pub. Co..
     
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  8.  11
    Maori Environmental Virtues.John Patterson - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (4):397-409.
    The standard sources for Maori ethics are the traditional narratives. These depict all things in the environment as sharing a common ancestry, and as thereby required, ideally, to exhibit certain virtues of respect and responsibility for each other. These environmental virtues are expressed in terms of distinctively Maori concepts: respect for mauri and tapu, kaitiakitanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, and environmental balance. I briefly explore these Maori environmental virtues, and draw from them some messages for the world at large.
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  9.  9
    The maori—A problem in social assimilation.W. S. Dale - 1931 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 9 (3):203-213.
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  10.  15
    The maori—a problem in social assimilation.W. S. Dale - 1931 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):203 – 213.
  11.  8
    A Maori il-logical ethics of the dark: An example with ‘trauma’.Carl Mika - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (5):426-435.
    Where has all the hilarity gone – and, with it, the ethics of the dark? In this article, I engage with our metaphysical entities of darkness and nothingness. Undermining and re-declaring are more than just pleasurable exercise for my own indigenous group – Maori; they are ethical necessities that keep one’s certainties in check. Whether it is agreeable or uncomfortable, this acknowledgement of those first beings is necessary if we are to avoid taking ourselves too seriously. I then consider (...)
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  12. Dossier Aldo Capitini: sorvegliato speciale dalla polizia.Andrea Maori & Giuseppe Moscati (eds.) - 2014 - [Viterbo]: Stampa alternativa/Nuovi equilibri.
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  13.  15
    Kaupapa Māori, Philosophy and Schools.Georgina Stewart - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-6.
    Goals for adding philosophy to the school curriculum centre on the perceived need to improve the general quality of critical thinking found in society. School philosophy also provides a means for asking questions of value and purpose about curriculum content across and between subjects, and, furthermore, it affirms the capability of children to think philosophically. Two main routes suggested are the introduction of philosophy as a subject, and processes of facilitating philosophical discussions as a way of establishing classroom ‘communities of (...)
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  14. A Mäori concept of collective responsibility.John Patterson - 1992 - In Graham Oddie & Roy W. Perrett (eds.), Justice, Ethics, and New Zealand Society. Oxford University Press. pp. 11--26.
     
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  15. Exile, Maori and lesbian.Michelle Erai - 2004 - In Lynne Alice & Lynne Star (eds.), Queer in Aotearoa New Zealand. Dunmore Press. pp. 35--46.
     
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  16. Mana Mäori motuhake: Challenges to 'käwanatanga'1840-1940.Lachy Paterson - forthcoming - Ki Te Whaiao: An Introduction to Mäori Culture and Society. Edited by Tänia Ka’Ai Et. Al. Auckland: Pearson Education.
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  17.  11
    Why robots can’t haka: skilled performance and embodied knowledge in the Māori haka.McArthur Mingon & John Sutton - 2021 - Synthese 199 (1-2):4337-4365.
    To investigate the unique kinds of mentality involved in skilled performance, this paper explores the performance ecology of the Māori haka, a ritual form of song and dance of the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand. We respond to a recent proposal to program robots to perform a haka as ‘cultural preservationists’ for ‘intangible cultural heritage’. This ‘Robot Māori Haka’ proposal raises questions about the nature of skill and the transmission of embodied knowledge; about the cognitive and affective experiences cultivated (...)
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  18.  8
    A Maori il-logical ethics of the dark: An example with ‘trauma’.Carl Mika - forthcoming - Tandf: Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
  19.  11
    Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):186.
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  20.  9
    Maori culture and modern ethnology: A preliminary survey, II.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 5 (3):186-201.
  21.  2
    Academic-Māori-Woman: The impossible may take a little longer.Georgina Tuari Stewart - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-6.
  22.  6
    Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):81.
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  23.  12
    Maori culture and modern ethnology: A preliminary survey, I.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):81 – 93.
  24.  4
    Maori culture and modern ethnology: A preliminary survey, I.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 5 (2):81-93.
  25.  4
    Maori culture and modern ethnology: A preliminary survey, II.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):186 – 201.
  26. Refusing the ‘Foolish Wisdom of Resignation’: Kaupapa Māori in conversation with Adorno.Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach & Carl Mika - 2019 - European Journal of Social Theory:1-18.
    Drawing on select works of Adorno, we will first rehearse his reasons for a rejuvenation of philosophy and apply them to philosophers working on world philosophical traditions. We will then analyse Adorno’s arguments pertaining to the theory–praxis relation to ascertain whether his thought could accommodate a study of world philosophical traditions for the simple reason that they are present in a particular society. Shifting our focus slightly, we reflect upon how current ways of professional philosophizing affect the study of world (...)
     
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  27.  25
    Indigenous Insights into Ethical Leadership: A Study of Māori Leaders.Jarrod Haar, Maree Roche & David Brougham - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (3):621-640.
    The need for ethical leadership in navigating today’s complex, global and competitive organisations has been established. While research has confirmed the importance of ethical leaders in promoting positive organisational and employee outcomes, scant research has examined the antecedents of ethical leadership. Furthermore, there has been a call for further examination of leadership models, particularly indigenous leadership models. Responding to these issues, this study suggests Māori leaders’ values add insights into enhancing ethical leadership. Three studies confirm the role of Māori values (...)
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  28.  44
    Theoretical Claims and Empirical Evidence in Maori Education Discourse.Elizabeth Rata - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1060-1072.
    Post‐Marxist critical sociology of education has influenced the development of indigenous Maori educational theory and research. Its effects are examined in four claims made for Maori education by indigenous theorists. The claims are: indigenous kaupapa Maori education is a revolutionary initiative; it is a cultural solution to Maori educational under‐achievement; it has reversed the decline of the Maori language; it provides a valid educational alternative for an ethnically and culturally distinctive population. The analysis suggests that (...)
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  29.  17
    The juxtaposition of Māori words with English concepts. ‘Hauora, Well-being’ as philosophy.Sharyn Heaton - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-9.
    Within the New Zealand curriculum, hauora has been co-opted as an underlying and interdependent concept at the heart of the learning area of health and physical education. Hauora is identified as a Māori philosophy of well-being, advocating a Māori world view of hauora. Contemporary understandings of hauora as a Māori philosophy of health are constructed within dominant English-medium curriculum discourses. At first glance the juxtaposition of ‘hauora’ with ‘well-being’, and hauora being defined as ‘a Māori philosophy of health’ seems like (...)
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  30.  15
    The juxtaposition of Māori words with English concepts. ‘Hauora, Well-being’ as philosophy.Sharyn Heaton - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):460-468.
    Within the New Zealand curriculum, hauora has been co-opted as an underlying and interdependent concept at the heart of the learning area of health and physical education. Hauora is identified as a Māori philosophy of well-being, advocating a Māori world view of hauora. Contemporary understandings of hauora as a Māori philosophy of health are constructed within dominant English-medium curriculum discourses. At first glance the juxtaposition of ‘hauora’ with ‘well-being’, and hauora being defined as ‘a Māori philosophy of health’ seems like (...)
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  31. Virtue ethics and maori ethics.Roy W. Perrett & John Patterson - 1991 - Philosophy East and West 41 (2):185-202.
  32.  65
    Relational Well-Being and Wealth: Māori Businesses and an Ethic of Care.Chellie Spiller, Ljiljana Erakovic, Manuka Henare & Edwina Pio - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):153-169.
    Care is at the heart of the Maori values system, which calls for humans to be kaitiaki, caretakers of the maun y the life-force, in each other and in nature. The relational Five Well-beings approach, based on four case studies of Maori businesses, demonstrates how business can create spiritual, cultural, social, environmental and economic well-being. A Well-beings approach entails praxis, which brings values and practice together with the purpose of consciously creating well-being and, in so doing, creates multi-dimensional (...)
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  33.  82
    A 'parallel process'? Beginning a constructive conversation about a mäori methodology.Fiona Cram, Hazel Phillips, Bevan Tipene-Matua, Murray Parsons & Katrina Taupo - 2004 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 1 (1):14-19.
    This paper documents the beginning of a conversation about what it means to be Mäori within a larger, mainstream research project. This larger project was conceived by a team of researchers that included a Mäori principal investigator, and funding was gained from a funding agency that has established criteria for Mäori responsiveness. The Mäori component of the project was, however, not initially conceived of as separate from the non-Mäori component. Discussions about this were initiated approximately one year into the project (...)
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  34.  78
    Science in the Māori‐medium Curriculum: Assessment of policy outcomes in Pūtaiao education.Georgina Stewart - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (7):724-741.
    This second research paper on science education in Māori‐medium school contexts complements an earlier article published in this journal. Science and science education are related domains in society and in state schooling in which there have always been particularly large discrepancies in participation and achievement by Māori. In 1995 a Kaupapa Māori analysis of this situation challenged New Zealand science education academics to deal with ‘the Māori crisis’ within science education. Recent NCEA results suggest Pūtaiao education, for which a national (...)
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  35. The 'warrior Gene' and the mãori people: The responsibility of the Geneticists.Laurence Perbal - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (7):382-387.
    The ‘gene of’ is a teleosemantic expression that conveys a simplistic and linear relationship between a gene and a phenotype. Throughout the 20th century, geneticists studied these genes of traits. The studies were often polemical when they concerned human traits: the ‘crime gene’, ‘poverty gene’, ‘IQ gene’, ‘gay gene’ or ‘gene of alcoholism’. Quite recently, a controversy occurred in 2006 in New Zealand that started with the claim that a ‘warrior gene’ exists in the Mãori community. This claim came from (...)
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  36.  1
    Manahau: Toward an Indigenous Māori theory of value.Jason Paul Mika, Kiri Dell, Jamie Newth & Carla Houkamau - 2022 - Philosophy of Management 21 (4):441-463.
    The theoretical challenge posed by this paper is to find a conceptualisation of value for entrepreneurship theory grounded in Indigenous knowledge from a Māori perspective capable of guiding entrepreneurs operating for sustainability and wellbeing. We review Western and Māori theories of value, values, and valuation. We argue that Indigenous concepts of value centre on collective wellbeing as opposed to self-interest, and have spiritual and material elements. The paper proposes a tentative Māori theory of value we call manahau, which combines mana (...)
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  37.  19
    Aotearoa: shine or shame? A critical examination of the Sustainable Development Goals and the question of poverty and young Māori in New Zealand.Merata Kawharu - 2015 - Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):43-50.
    As an international framework with broad support, the Sustainable Development Goals help to focus nations’ efforts on major issues and help policy-makers to specify areas of need for policy. While the goals are ambitious, they help to channel leaders’ thinking and action when goals are visible and normative. The goals also provide opportunity for first world nations, such as New Zealand, to examine how they apply to them. In terms of the predecessors to the SDGs, the Millennium Development Goals, New (...)
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  38.  5
    Negentropy for the anthropocene; Stiegler, Maori and exosomatic memory.Ruth Irwin & Te Haumoana White - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (5):532-544.
    Exosomatic memory is a crucial phase in the evolution of humanity because it enables learning to take place across groups and generations rather than exclusively through lived experience or one on one transmission. Exosomatic memory is the attribution of knowledge to objects, such as art or writing, which allows epistemology to be transmitted beyond the individual to subsequent generations of people. Exosomatic memory is the key to the transmission of culture and knowledge, beyond the individual who learns exclusively from personal (...)
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  39. Dynamic Forms in the Maori Concept of Reality.F. Allan Hanson - 1983 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 6 (3):180.
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  40.  15
    Syntagmatic structures: How the Maoris make sense of history.F. Allan Hanson - 1983 - Semiotica 46 (2-4).
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  41.  13
    Behind the smoke and mirrors of the Treaty of Waitangi claims settlement process in New Zealand: no prospect for justice and reconciliation for Māori without constitutional transformation.Margaret Mutu - 2018 - Journal of Global Ethics 14 (2):208-221.
    . Behind the smoke and mirrors of the Treaty of Waitangi claims settlement process in New Zealand: no prospect for justice and reconciliation for Māori without constitutional transformation. Journal of Global Ethics: Vol. 14, Special Issue: Reconciliation, Transitional and Indigenous Justice, pp. 208-221.
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  42.  15
    “Under Erasure”: Suppressed and Trans-Ethnic Māori Identities.Georgina Tuari Stewart & Makere Stewart-Harawira - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (2):1-12.
    The questions raised by Māori identity are not static, but complex and changing over time. The ethnicity known as “Māori” came into existence in colonial New Zealand as a new, pan-tribal identity concept, in response to the trauma of invasion and dispossession by large numbers of mainly British settlers. Ideas of Māori identity have changed over the course of succeeding generations in response to wider social and economic changes. While inter-ethnic marriages and other sexual liaisons have been common throughout the (...)
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  43.  20
    The ‘Hau’ of Research: Mauss Meets Kaupapa Māori.Georgina Stewart - 2017 - Journal of World Philosophies 2 (1):1-11.
    ‘The Gift’ is the English title of a small book first published in French in 1925 by sociologist Marcel Mauss, which catalyzed an ongoing debate linked to a wide range of scholarship. Mauss’s gift theory included the Māori example of the ‘hau of the gift’ which Mauss explained as a spiritual force, seeking to return to its original owner or place of origin. This article brings a critical Māori perspective to Mauss’ notion of the hau of the gift, in an (...)
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  44.  27
    A Relationship Between the Ethics of Care and Māori Worldview—The Place of Relationality and Care in Maori Mental Health Service Provision.Tula Brannelly, Amohia Boulton & Allie te Hiini - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare (4):1-13.
  45.  27
    Intellectual Property Law and the Globalization of Indigenous Cultural Expressions: Māori Tattoo and the Whitmill versus Warner Bros. Case.Leon Tan - 2013 - Theory, Culture and Society 30 (3):61-81.
    From the time of British colonial settlement, innumerable taonga have been appropriated from the indigenous Māori population of Aotearoa/New Zealand, from cloaks, weapons, carvings and musical instruments to the practices and products of tā moko. This article focuses on the topic of cultural appropriation, homing in on a recent legal case, Whitmill v. Warner Bros., in which an artist sued Warner Bros. in a US court for pirating a ‘ Māori-inspired’ tattoo created for Mike Tyson, so as to tease out (...)
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  46. A Heideggerian Analysis in the Teaching of Science to Maori Students.Robert Keith Shaw & Dan Love - 2007 - He Kupu 1 (3):31-43.
    Teachers frequently find that their teaching is unsuccessful with a particular group of students. This paper describes how Heidegger’s ontology was useful to teachers as they developed a distance education platform to teach astronomy to culturally diverse Aotearoa New Zealand secondary school students. Māori students do not perform well within their State’s model of normalising education, and academic authors ascribe this “failure” to the effects of cultural difference and imperialism. This paper conjectures that Māori are not merely “culturally different” but (...)
     
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  47. Life in a maori school.Sylvia Ashton Warner - 2008 - In Alexandra Miletta & Maureen McCann Miletta (eds.), Classroom Conversations: A Collection of Classics for Parents and Teachers. The New Press.
     
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  48.  45
    Exploring whakaaro: A way of responsive thinking in Maori research.Carl Mika & Kim Southey - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):795-803.
    The experience of researching as a Māori student within academia will often raise questions about how and whether the student’s research privileges Māori world views and articulates culturally specific epistemologies. This study offers some theorising, from the perspectives of a Maori doctoral student and her Maori supervisor, on the metaphysical nature of research for Maori. It emphasises that there is a space for speculative, creative and responsive thinking as a central method in the student’s doctoral research and (...)
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  49.  14
    ‘What if value and rights lie foundationally in groups?’ The Maori Case.Andrew Sharp - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (2):1-28.
    Liberal writers share the intuition that the fundamental moral particle is the human individual, not the group. In this paper, I adopt the opposing intuition which many, including the indigenous Maori of New Zealand, say they feel: that it is the group that is fundamental, rather than the individual. I attempt to work out the doctrine which results from that intuition and call it?group foundationalism?. I then seek to explore the tenability of group foundationalism, not from the perspective of (...)
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  50.  4
    Refusing the ‘Foolish Wisdom of Resignation’: Kaupapa Māori in conversation with Adorno.Carl Mika & Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach - 2020 - European Journal of Social Theory 23 (4):532-549.
    Drawing on select works of Adorno, we will first rehearse his reasons for a rejuvenation of philosophy and apply them to philosophers working on world philosophical traditions. We will then analyse Adorno’s arguments pertaining to the theory–praxis relation to ascertain whether his thought could accommodate a study of world philosophical traditions for the simple reason that they are present in a particular society. Shifting our focus slightly, we reflect upon how current ways of professional philosophizing affect the study of world (...)
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