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John Patterson [14]John R. Patterson [2]John Oberdiek & Patterson [1]
  1. Exploring Maori Values.John Patterson - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (1):183-186.
  2. Maori Environmental Virtues.John Patterson - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (4):397-409.
    The standard sources for Maori ethics are the traditional narratives. These depict all things in the environment as sharing a common ancestry, and as thereby required, ideally, to exhibit certain virtues of respect and responsibility for each other. These environmental virtues are expressed in terms of distinctively Maori concepts: respect for mauri and tapu, kaitiakitanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, and environmental balance. I briefly explore these Maori environmental virtues, and draw from them some messages for the world at large.
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  3. Virtue Ethics and Maori Ethics.Roy W. Perrett & John Patterson - 1991 - Philosophy East and West 41 (2):185-202.
  4. A Mäori Concept of Collective Responsibility.John Patterson - 1992 - In Graham Oddie & Roy W. Perrett (eds.), Justice, Ethics, and New Zealand Society. Oxford University Press. pp. 11--26.
     
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  5. People of the Land: A Pacific Philosophy.John Patterson - 2000 - Dunmore Press.
    This sequel to Exploring Maori Values develops the idea that humans can and need to become 'people of the land' in the Maori sense, developing a harmonious interdependence with the environment in which we live rather than continuing to dominate it. Although arising out of Maori concepts, this is a model for human life which is available to any culture.
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  6.  61
    Ancient Sicily - R. R. Holloway: The Archaeology of Ancient Sicily: Drawings by Anne Lovelace Holloway. Pp. Xix+211; 222 Illustrations, 2 Maps. London and New York: Routledge, 1991. Cased, £45. - R. J. A. Wilson: Sicily Under the Roman Empire: The Archaeology of a Roman Province, 36 B.C.–A.D. 535. Pp. Ix+452; 12 Colour Plates, 290 Black-and-White Illustrations. Warminster: Aris and Phillips, 1990. £120. [REVIEW]John R. Patterson - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (1):175-178.
  7.  31
    Romanisation Without Tears? Giovannella Cresci Marrone, Enrica Culasso Gastaldi (Edd.): Per Pagos Vicosque: Torino Romana Fra Orco E Stura. (Saggi E Materiali Universitari, 11: Serie di Antichità E Tradizione Classica, 10.) Pp. 235; 82 Plates (7 Colour), 38 Illustrations and 4 Maps. Padua: Editoriale Programma, 1988. Paper, L. 60,000. [REVIEW]John R. Patterson - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (1):155-156.
  8. Earning Mana in the Land.John Patterson - 1998 - South Pacific Journal of Philosophy and Culture 3.
     
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  9. Friends and Foes in Environmental Ethics: Poles Apart?John Patterson - 1997 - South Pacific Journal of Philosophy and Culture 2.
     
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  10. Moral Evaluation and Conceptual Analysis in Jurisprudential Methodology.John Oberdiek & Patterson & Dennis - 2007 - In Michael Freeman & Ross Harrison (eds.), Law and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  11.  22
    Ethnic Identity (G.D.) Farney Ethnic Identity and Aristocratic Competition in Republican Rome. Pp. Xx + 337, Ills, Maps. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Cased, US$85. ISBN: 978-0-521-86331-. [REVIEW]John Patterson - 2009 - The Classical Review 59 (2):556-.
  12.  12
    Environmental Mana.John Patterson - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (3):267-276.
    In Maori tradition, all creatures are naturally sacred or tapu, and cannot be used without ritual removal of the tapu, a symbolic acknowledgment of the mana of the gods concerned. Although there is a religious dimension to tapu, it is also the natural state of all creatures, reflecting the idea that they have intrinsic worth. The theist aspect of tapu can be bypassed: tapu is the mana of the atua or gods, whocan be seen as personifications of or indeed identical (...)
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  13.  22
    Environmental Mana.John Patterson - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (3):267-276.
    In Maori tradition, all creatures are naturally sacred or tapu, and cannot be used without ritual removal of the tapu, a symbolic acknowledgment of the mana of the gods concerned. Although there is a religious dimension to tapu, it is also the natural state of all creatures, reflecting the idea that they have intrinsic worth. The theist aspect of tapu can be bypassed: tapu is the mana of the atua or gods, whocan be seen as personifications of or indeed identical (...)
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  14.  10
    Maori Environmental Virtues.John Patterson - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (4):397-409.
    The standard sources for Maori ethics are the traditional narratives. These depict all things in the environment as sharing a common ancestry, and as thereby required, ideally, to exhibit certain virtues of respect and responsibility for each other. These environmental virtues are expressed in terms of distinctively Maori concepts: respect for mauri and tapu, kaitiakitanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, and environmental balance. I briefly explore these Maori environmental virtues, and draw from them some messages for the world at large.
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  15.  23
    How to Justify an Injustice.John Patterson - 1973 - Mind 82 (326):258-262.
  16.  7
    Ancient Sicily. [REVIEW]John Patterson - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (1):175-178.
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  17.  31
    Mana: Yin and Yang.John Patterson - 2000 - Philosophy East and West 50 (2):229-241.
    We can gain standing or mana in the world through cooperation (yin mana) or through competition (yang mana). Drawing on both Maori and Daoist ideas, the way of yin mana is explored, whereby all parties can gain through new and meaningful participatory activities.
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