Results for 'Form and Shape Perception*'

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  1.  23
    Perception and Neuroscience.Grant Gillett - 1989 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (1):83-103.
    Perception is often analysed as a process in which causal events from the environment act on a subject to produce states in the mind or brain. The role of the subject is an increasing feature of neuroscientific and cognitive literature. This feature is linked to the need for an account of the normative aspects of perceptual competence. A holographic model is offered in which objects are presented to the subject classified according to rules governing concepts and encoded in brain function (...)
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  2.  15
    Global shape integration and illusory form perception in the absence of awareness.Mikel Jimenez, Pedro R. Montoro & Dolores Luna - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 53:31-46.
  3. Unconscious and conscious priming by forms and their parts.Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Haluk Ogmen, Jose Ramon & Jian Chen - 2005 - Visual Cognition 12 (5):720-736.
     
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  4.  12
    Referential Form and Memory for the Discourse History.Si On Yoon, Aaron S. Benjamin & Sarah Brown-Schmidt - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (4):e12964.
    The way we refer to things in the world is shaped by the immediate physical context as well as the discourse history. But what part of the discourse history is relevant to language use in the present? In four experiments, we combine the study of task‐based conversation with measures of recognition memory to examine the role of physical contextual cues that shape what speakers perceive to be a part of the relevant discourse history. Our studies leverage the differentiation effect, (...)
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  5.  28
    Construal level and free will beliefs shape perceptions of actors' proximal and distal intent.Jason E. Plaks & Jeffrey S. Robinson - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:135664.
    Two components of lay observers’ calculus of moral judgment are proximal intent (the actor’s mind is focused on performing the action) and distal intent (the actor’s mind is focused on the broader goal). What causes observers to prioritize one form of intent over the other? The authors observed whether construal level (Studies 1-2) and beliefs about free will (Studies 3-4) would influence participants’ sensitivity to the actor’s proximal versus distal intent. In four studies, participants read scenarios in which the (...)
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  6. Shape Properties and Perception.Kirk Ludwig - 1996 - Philosophical Issues 7:325-350.
    We can perceive shapes visually and tactilely, and the information we gain about shapes through both sensory modalities is integrated smoothly into and functions in the same way in our behavior independently of whether we gain it by sight or touch. There seems to be no reason in principle we couldn't perceive shapes through other sensory modalities as well, although as a matter of fact we do not. While we can identify shapes through other sensory modalities—e.g., I may know by (...)
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  7.  32
    Cycling as Reading a Cityscape: A Phenomenological Approach to Interface-Shaped Perception.Janez Strehovec - 2010 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 10 (2):1-11.
    This essay attempts to assess whether the perceptual issues posed by the contemporary interface culture, and the constant attitude shift demanded by the new media between the “natural” and the “as if” modes, might be considered a significant challenge for phenomenological aesthetics as understood in terms of Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of perception. To demonstrate how the use of a particular interface profoundly shapes the form and structure of an activity as well as enabling perception of a particular kind, the author (...)
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  8. Visual masking reveals differences between the nonconscious and conscious processing of form and surface attributes.Bruno G. Breitmeyer & Haluk Ögmen - 2006 - In Haluk Ögmen & Bruno G. Breitmeyer (eds.), The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. MIT Press. pp. 315-333.
  9.  83
    The Objective Eye: Color, Form, and Reality in the Theory of Art.John Hyman - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    “The longer you work, the more the mystery deepens of what appearance is, or how what is called appearance can be made in another medium."—Francis Bacon, painter This, in a nutshell, is the central problem in the theory of art. It has fascinated philosophers from Plato to Wittgenstein. And it fascinates artists and art historians, who have always drawn extensively on philosophical ideas about language and representation, and on ideas about vision and the visible world that have deep philosophical roots. (...)
  10. Compositionality in Perception: A Framework.Kevin J. Lande - forthcoming - WIREs Cognitive Science.
    Perception involves the processing of content or information about the world. In what form is this content represented? I argue that perception is widely compositional. The perceptual system represents many stimulus features (including shape, orientation, and motion) in terms of combinations of other features (such as shape parts, slant and tilt, common and residual motion vectors). But compositionality can take a variety of forms. The ways in which perceptual representations compose are markedly different from the ways in (...)
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  11.  79
    Blindsight and shape perception: Deficit of visual consciousness or of visual function?Anthony J. Marcel - 1998 - Brain 121:1565-88.
  12.  58
    On time, memory and dynamic form.Stephen E. Robbins - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):762-788.
    A common approach to explaining the perception of form is through the use of static features. The weakness of this approach points naturally to dynamic definitions of form. Considering dynamical form, however, leads inevitably to the need to explain how events are perceived as time-extended—a problem with primacy over that even of qualia. Optic flow models, energy models, models reliant on a rigidity constraint are examined. The reliance of these models on the instantaneous specification of form (...)
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  13. Orientation in visual perception; The perception of tip-character in forms.Minnie Radner & James J. Gibson - 1935 - Psychological Monographs 46:48-65.
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  14. An Affective Perception: How "Vitality Forms" Influence Our Mood.Martina Sauer, Giada Lombardi & Giuseppe Di Cesare - 2023 - Art Style 11 (1):127—139.
    The form of an action has a strong influence on the interaction between humans. According to their mood, people may perform the same gesture in different ways, such as gently or rudely. These aspects of social communication are named vitality forms by Daniel Stern, represent a mean to establish a direct and immediate connection with others. Indeed, the expression of different vitality forms enables us to communicate our affective states and at the same time the perception of these vitality (...)
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  15.  24
    Resolving differing stakeholder perceptions of urban rooftop farming in Mediterranean cities: promoting food production as a driver for innovative forms of urban agriculture.Esther Sanyé-Mengual, Isabelle Anguelovski, Jordi Oliver-Solà, Juan Ignacio Montero & Joan Rieradevall - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):101-120.
    Urban agriculture (UA) is spreading within the Global North, largely for food production, ranging from household individual gardens to community gardens that boost neighborhood regeneration. Additionally, UA is also being integrated into buildings, such as urban rooftop farming (URF). Some URF experiences succeed in North America both as private and community initiatives. To date, little attention has been paid to how stakeholders perceive UA and URF in the Mediterranean or to the role of food production in these initiatives. This study (...)
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  16. Perception and Attention.Ronald A. Rensink - 2013 - In Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Psychology. pp. 97-116.
    Our visual experience of the world is one of diverse objects and events, each with particular colors, shapes, and motions. This experience is so coherent, so immediate, and so effortless that it seems to result from a single system that lets us experience everything in our field of view. But however appealing, this belief is mistaken: there are severe limits on what can be visually experienced. -/- For example, in a display for air-traffic control it is important to track all (...)
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  17. Seeing, Doing, and Knowing: A Philosophical Theory of Sense Perception.Mohan Matthen - 2005 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK.
    Seeing, Doing, and Knowing is an original and comprehensive philosophical treatment of sense perception as it is currently investigated by cognitive neuroscientists. Its central theme is the task-oriented specialization of sensory systems across the biological domain. Sensory systems are automatic sorting machines; they engage in a process of classification. Human vision sorts and orders external objects in terms of a specialized, proprietary scheme of categories - colours, shapes, speeds and directions of movement, etc. This 'Sensory Classification Thesis' implies that sensation (...)
  18. Perceiving As: Non-conceptual Forms of Perception in Medieval Philosophy.Juhana Toivanen - 2019 - In Elena Băltuță (ed.), Medieval Perceptual Puzzles: Theories of Sense Perception in the 13th and 14th Centuries. Leiden ;: Investigating Medieval Philoso. pp. 10–37.
    The aim of this chapter is to take a closer look at medieval discussions concerning the phenomenon of ‘perceiving as,’ and the psychological mechanisms that lie behind it. In contemporary philosophical literature this notion is usually used to refer to conceptual aspects of perception. For instance, when I perceive a black birdlike shape as a crow, I may be said to perceive the particular sensible thing x as an instance of a universal crowness φ, that is, as belonging to (...)
     
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  19.  21
    Blaming the unvaccinated during the COVID-19 pandemic: the roles of political ideology and risk perceptions in the USA.Maja Graso, Karl Aquino, Fan Xuan Chen & Kevin Bardosh - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (4):246-252.
    Individuals unvaccinated against COVID-19 (C19) experienced prejudice and blame for the pandemic. Because people vastly overestimate C19 risks, we examined whether these negative judgements could be partially understood as a form of scapegoating (ie, blaming a group unfairly for an undesirable outcome) and whether political ideology (previously shown to shape risk perceptions in the USA) moderates scapegoating of the unvaccinated. We grounded our analyses in scapegoating literature and risk perception during C19. We obtained support for our speculations through (...)
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  20.  7
    Cognition and temporality: the genesis of historical thought in perception and reasoning.Mark E. Blum - 2019 - New York: Peter Lang ;.
    Cognition and Temporality argues that both verbal grammar and figural grammar have their cognitive basis in twelve characteristic forms of judgment, distributed among individuals in human populations throughout history. These twelve logical forms are context-free and language-free foundations in our attentional awareness, and shape all verbal and figural statements. Moreover, these types of historical judgment are psychogenetic inheritances in a population, and each serves a distinct problem-solving function in the human species. Through analysis of verbal and figural statements, the (...)
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  21.  17
    Transfer of experience with a class-schema to identification-learning of patterns and shapes.Fred Attneave - 1957 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (2):81.
  22. Orientation in visual perception; The recognition of familiar plane forms in differing orientations.James J. Gibson & Doris Robinson - 1935 - Psychological Monographs 46 (6):39-47.
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  23.  6
    Shape Perception and Navigation in Blind Adults.Monica Gori, Giulia Cappagli, Gabriel Baud-Bovy & Sara Finocchietti - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  24.  29
    Psychomorphospace—From Biology to Perception, and Back: Towards an Integrated Quantification of Facial Form Variation.Katrin Schaefer, Philipp Mitteroecker, Bernhard Fink & Fred L. Bookstein - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (1):98-106.
    Several disciplines share an interest in the evolutionary selection pressures that shaped human physical functioning and appearance, psyche, and behavior. The methodologies invoked from the disciplines studying these domains are often based on different rhetorics, and hence may conflict. Progress in one field is thereby hampered from effective transfer to others. Topics at the intersection of anthropometry and psychometry, such as the impact of sexual selection on the hominin face, are a typical example. Since the underlying theory explicitly places facial (...)
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  25. Perception, action, and nonconceptual content.Alva Noe - manuscript
    profile deforms as we move about it. As perceivers we are masters of the patterns of sensorimotor contingency that shape our perceptual interaction with the world. We expect changes in such things as apparent size, shape and color to occur as we actively explore the environment. In encountering perspective-dependent changes of this sort, we learn how things are quite apart form our particular perspective. Our possession of these skills is constitutive of our ability to see . This (...)
     
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  26.  13
    Bent out of Shape: The Projection of Male Anxiety onto Busks and Stays in Early Modern Europe.Julia-Rose Miller - 2022 - Constellations 13 (1&2).
    An interesting pattern emerges in the Early Modern Era of women taking control of their lives and bodies through the use of material culture, and men being terrified of this fact. Women often lacked agency in a world with ever-changing perceptions of not only femininity, but also of the female form. Clothing was then one of the few ways that these women who lacked power could control their body and their spheres. To those living in the Early Modern Era, (...)
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  27.  13
    Risk Perception and Protective Behavior in the Context of COVID-19: a Qualitative Exploration.Salma Siddiqui & Azher Hameed Qamar - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (4):401-420.
    As a result of the devastating health effects of the COVID-19 outbreak, the lockdown has been considered a safety measure in many countries. In Pakistan, the first case of COVID-19 was reported in February 2020. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate people’s risk perception and protective behavior during the lockdown. Twenty-two (22) participants from eight big cities across Pakistan were interviewed. A six-step reflective thematic analysis was used for data analysis. The study focused on risk perception and (...)
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  28.  51
    Why do students cheat? Perceptions, evaluations, and motivations.Talia Waltzer & Audun Dahl - 2023 - Ethics and Behavior 33 (2):130-150.
    Academic cheating, a common and consequential form of dishonesty, has puzzled moral psychologists and educators for decades. The present research examined a new theoretical approach to the perceptions, evaluations, and motivations that shape students’ decisions to cheat. We tested key predictions of this approach by systematically examining students’ accounts of their own cheating. In two studies, we interviewed undergraduates in psychology (n = 68) and engineering (n = 123) classes about their past experiences with plagiarism or other cheating. (...)
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  29. Philosophy of Perception and the Phenomenology of Visual Space.Gary Hatfield - 2011 - Philosophic Exchange 42 (1):31-66.
    In the philosophy of perception, direct realism has come into vogue. Philosophical authors assert and assume that what their readers want, and what anyone should want, is some form of direct realism. There are disagreements over precisely what form this direct realism should take. The majority of positions in favor now offer a direct realism in which objects and their material or physical properties constitute the contents of perception, either because we have an immediate or intuitive acquaintance with (...)
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  30.  57
    Light and the Aesthetics of Perception.Carlo Volf - 2011 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 22 (40-41).
    Light seems to be a very changeable size in our build environment. Being an immaterial building stone, light takes a very liquid shape in our design-vocabulary. It consists of an invisible material – photons – and therefore it takes no specific form in itself but is only articulated through the meeting with form. Therefore, since form has been the major theme for the aesthetics up until now, giving form to light is a complex and challenging (...)
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  31.  41
    Conscious visual representations built from multiple binding processes: Evidence from neuropsychology.Glyn W. Humphreys - 2003 - In Axel Cleeremans (ed.), The Unity of Consciousness: Binding, Integration, and Dissociation. Oxford University Press.
  32.  18
    Shape perception for round and elliptically shaped test objects.H. W. Leibowitz & Kathleen A. Meneghini - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (2):244.
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  33.  84
    Sellars and Nonconceptual Content.Steven Levine - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (4):855-878.
    In this paper I take up the question of whether Wilfrid Sellars has a notion of non-conceptual perceptual content. The question is controversial, being one of the fault lines along which so-called left and right Sellarsians diverge. In the paper I try to make clear what it is in Sellars' thought that leads interpreters to such disparate conclusions. My account depends on highlighting the importance of Sellars' little discussed thesis that perception involves a systematic form of mis-categorization, one where (...)
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  34. Action-based Theories of Perception.Robert Briscoe & Rick Grush - 2015 - In The Stanford Encylcopedia of Philosophy. pp. 1-66.
    Action is a means of acquiring perceptual information about the environment. Turning around, for example, alters your spatial relations to surrounding objects and, hence, which of their properties you visually perceive. Moving your hand over an object’s surface enables you to feel its shape, temperature, and texture. Sniffing and walking around a room enables you to track down the source of an unpleasant smell. Active or passive movements of the body can also generate useful sources of perceptual information (Gibson (...)
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  35. Visual extinction and awareness: The importance of binding dorsal and ventral pathways.Gordon C. Baylis, Christopher L. Gore, P. Dennis Rodriguez & Rebecca J. Shisler - 2001 - Visual Cognition. Special Issue 8 (3):359-379.
     
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  36.  30
    Between nature and culture: Jakob von Uexküll's concept of Umwelten and how photography shapes our worlds.Joachim Froese - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):11-22.
    This article addresses traditional perceptions about photography's position between nature and culture and concomitant schools of thinking focusing pre-dominantly on the photographic image as a form of visual representation. Aiming to develop an alternative perspective it considers a biosemiotic approach and turns to Jakob von Uexküll's model of subjective sentient worlds that critically dissolves the perceived dualism between nature and culture that has also underpinned most theoretical thinking about photography in the past. Today photography is largely embedded into social (...)
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  37. Perception and neuroscience.Grant Gillett - 1989 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (March) 83 (March):83-103.
    Perception is often analysed as a process in which causal events from the environment act on a subject to produce states in the mind or brain. The role of the subject is an increasing feature of neuroscientific and cognitive literature. This feature is linked to the need for an account of the normative aspects of perceptual competence. A holographic model is offered in which objects are presented to the subject classified according to rules governing concepts and encoded in brain function (...)
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  38.  9
    Preferences and Perceptions of Workplace Participation: A Cross-Cultural Study.Sherry Jueyu Wu, Bruce Yuhan Mei & Jose Cervantez - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Despite the amount of theorization on the forms and effects of participation, relatively little research directly examines what the concept of workplace participation entails in the minds of employees, and whether employees across cultures think positively when the concept of participation is activated in their mental representation. Three studies investigated the perceptions and preferences of full-time employees from the United States and China, cultures that might be expected to differ in their societal participation norm. Using a free association test and (...)
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  39.  18
    Aesthetic Experience and Education: Themes and Questions.Lori A. Custodero, David T. Hansen, Anna Neumann & Deborah Kerdeman - 2005 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (2):88-96.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Aesthetic Experience and Education:Themes and QuestionsDeborah Kerdeman"Being with" music. Attentive responsiveness in teaching. Scholarly learning as engagement with beauty. Three evocative images of aesthetic experience come to light in the essays by Custodero, Hansen, and Neumann. From the musical play of children conducting imaginary orchestras to the vocational aspirations of adults who gaze through telescopes or study paintings at Chicago's Art Institute, aesthetic experience spans a range of activities (...)
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  40.  24
    The Disarticulation of Time: the Zeitbewußtsein in Phenomenology of Perception.Keith Whitmoyer - 2015 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 46 (3):213-232.
    In an effort to reassess the status of Phenomenology of Perception and its relation to The Visible and the Invisible, this essay argues that Merleau-Ponty's engagement with Husserl's text and his discussion of the “field of presence” in La temporalité are intended to think through the field in which time makes its appearance as one of passage. Time does not show itself as presence or in the present but manifests itself as Ablauf, as lapse or flow, an écoulement that is (...)
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  41. Abstract - Affective – Multimodal: Interaction between Medium and Perception of Moving Images from the Viewpoint of Cassirer's, Langer's and Krois' Embodiment Theories.Martina Sauer - 2022 - In Multimodality. The Sensually Organized Potential of Artistic Works, edited by Martina Sauer and Christiane Wagner, New York and São Paulo [Special Issue, Art Style 10, 01, 2022]. pp. 25-46.
    Everyday media consumption leaves no doubt that the perception of moving images from various media is characterized by experience and understanding. Corresponding research in this field has shown that the stimulus patterns flooding in on us are not only processed mentally, but also bodily. Building on this, the following study argues that incoming stimuli are processed not only visually, but multimodally, with all senses, and moreover affectively. The classical binding of a sensory organ to a medium, on whose delimitation the (...)
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  42.  93
    Representing shape in sight and touch.E. J. Green - 2022 - Mind and Language 37 (4):694-714.
    We represent shape in both sight and touch, but how do these abilities relate to one another? This issue has been discussed in the context of Molyneux's question of whether someone born blind could, upon being granted sight, identify shapes visually. Some have suggested that we might look to real‐world cases of sight restoration to illuminate the relation between visual and tactual shape representations. Here, I argue that newly sighted perceivers should not be relied on in this way (...)
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  43.  5
    Corporate Perceptions of the Business Case for Supplier Diversity: How Socially Responsible Purchasing can ‘Pay’.Ian Worthington - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):47-60.
    In exploring corporate perceptions of the business case for supplier diversity, this paper reports on a cross-national study of large purchasing organisations that had introduced, or were in the process of introducing, purchasing initiatives aimed at ethnic minority businesses. The research investigates how LPOs portray the benefits of this form of socially responsible purchasing and suggests a business case construct based on four component elements. It also highlights a number of contextual factors that appear to have shaped business case (...)
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  44. Perception of partly occluded objects in infancy* 1.Philip J. Kellman & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 1983 - Cognitive Psychology 15 (4):483–524.
    Four-month-old infants sometimes can perceive the unity of a partly hidden object. In each of a series of experiments, infants were habituated to one object whose top and bottom were visible but whose center was occluded by a nearer object. They were then tested with a fully visible continuous object and with two fully visible object pieces with a gap where the occluder had been. Pattems of dishabituation suggested that infants perceive the boundaries of a partly hidden object by analyzing (...)
     
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  45. Open Form and the Shape of Ideas: Literary Structures as Representations of Philosophical Concepts in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries.Oscar Kenshur - 1991 - Diderot Studies 24:204-205.
     
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  46. On the Matching of Seen and Felt Shape by Newly Sighted Subjects.John Schwenkler - 2012 - I-Perception 3 (3):186-188.
    How do we recognize identities between seen shapes and felt ones? Is this due to associative learning, or to intrinsic connections these sensory modalities? We can address this question by testing the capacities of newly sighted subjects to match seen and felt shapes, but only if it is shown that the subjects can see the objects well enough to form adequate visual representations of their shapes. In light of this, a recent study by R. Held and colleagues fails to (...)
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  47.  3
    The other in perception: a phenomenological account of our experience of other persons.Susan Bredlau - 2018 - Albany: State University of New York Press.
    Demonstrates the unique, pervasive, and overwhelmingly important role of other people within our lived experience. Drawing on the original phenomenological work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Edmund Husserl, Simone de Beauvoir, and John Russon, as well as recent research in child psychology, The Other in Perception argues for perception’s inherently existential significance: we always perceive a world and not just objective facts. The world is the rich domain of our personal and interpersonal lives, and central to this world is the role of (...)
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  48.  32
    Perception as a Hermeneutical Act.Patrick A. Heelan - 1983 - Review of Metaphysics 37 (1):61 - 75.
    IN A recent work I have attempted to show that visual space tends to have a Euclidean geometrical structure only when the environment is filled with a repetitive pattern of regularly faceted objects carpentered to exhibit simple standard Euclidean shapes, and tends to have a hyperbolic structure when vision is deprived of these clues. I conclude that visual perception--and by analogy, all perception--is hermeneutic as well as causal: it responds to structures in the flow of optical energy, but the character (...)
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  49.  3
    Unbelievable: why we believe and why we don't.Graham Ward - 2014 - New York: I.B. Tauris.
    Why believe? What kinds of things do people believe in? How have they come to believe them? And how does what they believe -- or disbelieve -- shape their lives and the meaning the world has for them? For Graham Ward, who is one of the most innovative writers on contemporary religion, these questions are more than just academic. They go to the heart not only of who but of what we are as human beings. Over the last thirty (...)
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  50.  14
    Rhythm in the Qur'ān and its Forms.Sihan Mohammed - 2023 - Sakarya Üniversitesi İlahiyat Fakültesi Dergisi 25 (47):35-54.
    The Qur’ānic rhythmicity, represented in the intonations of the music emitted in folds of the Great Qur'ān came as the basis for the passion for recitation and listening pleasure. Although there have been several studies on this subject, the focus of the research has been on rhythmic forms: What they are, their composition, and the effect of their representation in Qur’ānic styles as a kind of renewed vision, understanding, and perception of Qur’ānic discourse. The research, therefore, followed the approach of (...)
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