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  1. Consciousness and Mental Causation: Contemporary Empirical Cases for Epiphenomenalism, in Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Consciousness.Benjamin Kozuch (ed.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
  2. Implicit Biases in Visually Guided Action.Berit Brogaard - 2021 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 17):S3943–S3967.
    For almost half a century dual-stream advocates have vigorously defended the view that there are two functionally specialized cortical streams of visual processing originating in the primary visual cortex: a ventral, perception-related ‘conscious’ stream and a dorsal, action-related ‘unconscious’ stream. They furthermore maintain that the perceptual and memory systems in the ventral stream are relatively shielded from the action system in the dorsal stream. In recent years, this view has come under scrutiny. Evidence points to two overlapping action pathways: a (...)
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  3. Does What We Dream Feel Present? Two Varieties of Presence and Implications for Measuring Presence in VR.Michael Barkasi - 2020 - Synthese 199 (1-2):2525-2551.
    What’s presented in our normal waking perceptual visual experiences feels present to us, while what we “see” in pictures and imagine does not. What about dreams? Does what we “see” in a dream feel present? Jennifer Windt has argued for an affirmative answer, for all dreams. But the dreams which flow from the brain’s registration of myoclonic twitches present a challenge to this answer. During these dreams motion-guiding vision is shut off, and, as Mohan Matthen has argued, motion-guiding vision seems (...)
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  4. Working Memory Can Compare Two Visual Items Without Accessing Visual Consciousness.Shun Nakano & Masami Ishihara - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 78:102859.
  5. Is Vision for Action Unconscious?Wayne Wu - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy 117 (8):413-433.
    Empirical work and philosophical analysis have led to widespread acceptance that vision for action, served by the cortical dorsal stream, is unconscious. I argue that the empirical argument for this claim is unsound. That argument relies on subjects’ introspective reports. Yet on biological grounds, in light of the theory of primate cortical vision, introspection has no access to dorsal stream mediated visual states. It is thus wrongly assumed that introspective reports speak to absent phenomenology in the dorsal stream. In light (...)
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  6. Against a “Mindless” Account of Perceptual Expertise.Amit Chaturvedi - 2019 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):509-531.
    According to Hubert Dreyfus’s famous claim that expertise is fundamentally “mindless,” experts in any domain perform most effectively when their activity is automatic and unmediated by concepts or cognitive processes like attention and memory. While several scholars have recently challenged the plausibility of Dreyfus’s “mindless” account of expertise for explaining a wide range of expert activities, there has been little consideration of the one form of expertise which might be most amenable to Dreyfus’s account – namely, perceptual expertise. Indeed, Dreyfus’s (...)
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  7. The Role of Levels of Processing in Disentangling the ERP Signatures of Conscious Visual Processing.Monika Derda, Marcin Koculak, Bert Windey, Krzysztof Gociewicz, Michał Wierzchoń, Axel Cleeremans & Marek Binder - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 73:102767.
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  8. Taking Into Consideration Explanations of Perception-Action Interactions That May Be “Less Dramatic, but More Reflective of What Happens in the Real World”.Robert W. Proctor & Aiping Xiong - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 64:176-182.
  9. The 72-Year-Old Grad Student.Philip Tseng - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 64:3-5.
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  10. Cortical Color and the Cognitive Sciences.Berit Brogaard & Dimitria Electra Gatzia - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (1):135-150.
    Back when researchers thought about the various forms that color vision could take, the focus was primarily on the retinal mechanisms. Since that time, research on human color vision has shifted from an interest in retinal mechanisms to cortical color processing. This has allowed color research to provide insight into questions that are not limited to early vision but extend to cognition. Direct cortical connections from higher-level areas to lower-level areas have been found throughout the brain. One of the classic (...)
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  11. How to (and How Not to) Think About Top-Down Influences on Visual Perception.Christoph Teufel & Bence Nanay - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 47:17-25.
    The question of whether cognition can influence perception has a long history in neuroscience and philosophy. Here, we outline a novel approach to this issue, arguing that it should be viewed within the framework of top-down information-processing. This approach leads to a reversal of the standard explanatory order of the cognitive penetration debate: we suggest studying top-down processing at various levels without preconceptions of perception or cognition. Once a clear picture has emerged about which processes have influences on those at (...)
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  12. Visual Phenomenology.Michael Madary - 2016 - MIT Press.
    In this book, Michael Madary examines visual experience, drawing on both phenomenological and empirical methods of investigation. He finds that these two approaches—careful, philosophical description of experience and the science of vision—independently converge on the same result: Visual perception is an ongoing process of anticipation and fulfillment. Madary first makes the case for the descriptive premise, arguing that the phenomenology of vision is best described as on ongoing process of anticipation and fulfillment. He discusses visual experience as being perspectival, temporal, (...)
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  13. The Two-Visual-Systems Hypothesis and the Perspectival Features of Visual Experience.Robert T. Foley, Robert L. Whitwell & Melvyn A. Goodale - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 35:225-233.
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  14. The Automatic and the Ballistic: Modularity Beyond Perceptual Processes.Eric Mandelbaum - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (8):1147-1156.
    Perceptual processes, in particular modular processes, have long been understood as being mandatory. But exactly what mandatoriness amounts to is left to intuition. This paper identifies a crucial ambiguity in the notion of mandatoriness. Discussions of mandatory processes have run together notions of automaticity and ballisticity. Teasing apart these notions creates an important tool for the modularist's toolbox. Different putatively modular processes appear to differ in their kinds of mandatoriness. Separating out the automatic from the ballistic can help the modularist (...)
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  15. Hemispheric Asymmetry in the Influence of Language on Visual Perception.Yanliang Sun, Yongchun Cai & Shena Lu - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 34:16-27.
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  16. Visual Experience.Michael Madary - 2014 - In Lawrence Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge. pp. 263-271.
  17. Against Division: Consciousness, Information and the Visual Streams.Wayne Wu - 2014 - Mind and Language 29 (4):383-406.
    Milner and Goodale's influential account of the primate cortical visual streams involves a division of consciousness between them, for it is the ventral stream that has the responsibility for visual consciousness. Hence, the dorsal visual stream is a ‘zombie’ stream. In this article, I argue that certain information carried by the dorsal stream likely plays a central role in the egocentric spatial content of experience, especially the experience of visual spatial constancy. Thus, the dorsal stream contributes to a pervasive feature (...)
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  18. Is Action-Guiding Vision Cognitively Impenetrable?Bence Nanay - 2013 - Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
    The aim of this paper is to argue that action-guiding vision is not cognitively impenetrable and arguments that suggest otherwise rely on an unjustified identification between actionguiding vision and dorsal vision – a functional and an anatomical way of describing the mind. The examination of these arguments show the importance of making a distinction between the functional and the anatomical level when addressing the problem of cognitive penetrability.
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  19. The Case for Zombie Agency.Wayne Wu - 2013 - Mind 122 (485):217-230.
    In response to Mole 2009, I present an argument for zombie action. The crucial question is not whether but rather to what extent we are zombie agents. I argue that current evidence supports only minimal zombie agency.
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  20. Distinct Task-Independent Visual Thresholds for Egocentric and Allocentric Information Pick Up.Matthieu M. De Wit, John Van der Kamp & Rich Sw Masters - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1410-1418.
    The dominant view of the ventral and dorsal visual systems is that they subserve perception and action. De Wit, Van der Kamp, and Masters suggested that a more fundamental distinction might exist between the nature of information exploited by the systems. The present study distinguished between these accounts by asking participants to perform delayed matching , pointing and perceptual judgment responses to masked Müller–Lyer stimuli of varying length. Matching and pointing responses of participants who could not perceptually judge stimulus length (...)
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  21. Affordances and Classification: On the Significance of a Sidebar in James Gibson's Last Book.Rob Withagen & Anthony Chemero - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (4):521 - 537.
    This article is about a sidebar in James Gibson's last book, The ecological approach to visual perception. In this sidebar, Gibson, the founder of the ecological perspective of perception and action, argued that to perceive an affordance is not to classify an object. Although this sidebar has received scant attention, it is of great significance both historically and for recent discussions about specificity, direct perception, and the functions of the dorsal and ventral streams. It is argued that Gibson's acknowledgment of (...)
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  22. The Dorsal Stream and the Visual Horizon.Michael Madary - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):423-438.
    Today many philosophers of mind accept that the two cortical streams of visual processing in humans can be distinguished in terms of conscious experience. The ventral stream is thought to produce representations that may become conscious, and the dorsal stream is thought to handle unconscious vision for action. Despite a vast literature on the topic of the two streams, there is currently no account of the way in which the relevant empirical evidence could fit with basic Husserlian phenomenology of vision. (...)
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  23. Perceiving Pictures.Bence Nanay - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):461-480.
    I aim to give a new account of picture perception: of the way our visual system functions when we see something in a picture. My argument relies on the functional distinction between the ventral and dorsal visual subsystems. I propose that it is constitutive of picture perception that our ventral subsystem attributes properties to the depicted scene, whereas our dorsal subsystem attributes properties to the picture surface. This duality elucidates Richard Wollheim’s concept of the “twofoldness” of our experience of pictures: (...)
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  24. Neurophysiology of Temporal Orienting in Ventral Visual Stream.Britt Anderson & David L. Sheinberg - 2010 - In Anna C. Nobre & Jennifer T. Coull (eds.), Attention and Time. Oxford University Press. pp. 407.
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  25. Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception.Robert Briscoe - 2009 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423-460.
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
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  26. Another Look at the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis: The Argument From Illusion Studies.Robert Briscoe - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (8):35-62.
    The purpose of this paper is to defend what I call the action-oriented coding theory (ACT) of spatially contentful visual experience. Integral to ACT is the view that conscious visual experience and visually guided action make use of a common subject-relative or 'egocentric' frame of reference. Proponents of the influential two visual systems hypothesis (TVSH), however, have maintained on empirical grounds that this view is false (Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006; Clark, 1999; 2001; Campbell, 2002; Jacob & Jeannerod, 2003; Goodale & (...)
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  27. Picture Perception and the Two Visual Subsystems.Bence Nanay - 2008 - Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
    I aim to give a new account of picture perception: of the way our visual system functions when we see something in a picture. My argument relies on the functional distinction between the ventral and dorsal visual subsystems. I propose that it is constitutive of picture perception that our ventral subsystem attributes properties to the scene, whereas our dorsal subsystem attributes properties to the surface. Keywords: picture perception; dorsal subsystem;.
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  28. Visual Attention, Conceptual Content, and Doing It Right.Wayne Wu - 2008 - Mind 117 (468):1003-1033.
    Reflection on the fine-grained information required for visual guidance of action has suggested that visual content is non-conceptual. I argue that in a common type of visually guided action, namely the use of manipulable artefacts, vision has conceptual content. Specifically, I show that these actions require visual attention and that concepts are involved in directing attention. In acting with artefacts, there is a way of doing it right as determined by the artefact’s conventional use. Attention must reflect our understanding of (...)
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  29. Duplex Vision: Separate Cortical Pathways for Conscious Perception and the Control of Action.Melvyn A. Goodale - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 616--627.
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  30. Grasping the Past and Present: When Does Visuomotor Priming Occur?Melvyn A. Goodale, Jonathan S. Cant & Grzegorz Króliczak - 2006 - In Ögmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 51-71). Cambridge, Ma, Us: Mit Press. Xi, 410 Pp.
  31. Ögmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 51-71). Cambridge, MA, US: MIT Press. Xi, 410 Pp. [REVIEW]Melvyn A. Goodale, Jonathan S. Cant & Grzegorz Króliczak - 2006
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  32. Review of Zenon Pylyshyn's Seeing and Visualizing: It's Not What You Think. [REVIEW]Catharine Abell - 2005 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 11.
    This book has three principle aims: to show that neither vision nor mental imagery involves the creation or inspection of picture-like mental representations; to defend the claim that our visual processes are, in significant part, cognitively impenetrable; and to develop a theory of “visual indexes”. In what follows, I assess Pylyshyn’s success in realising each of these aims in turn. I focus primarily on his arguments against “picture theories” of vision and mental imagery, to which approximately half the book is (...)
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  33. Direct Evidence for a Parietal-Frontal Pathway Subserving Spatial Awareness in Humans.Michel T. de Schotten, Marika Urbanski, Hugues Duffau, Emmanuelle Volle, Richard Lévy, Bruno Dubois & Paolo Bartolomeo - 2005 - Science 309 (5744):2226-2228.
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  34. Perceiving the World and Grasping It: Dissociations Between Conscious and Unconscious Visual Processing.Melvyn A. Goodale - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press. pp. 1159-1172.
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  35. Sight Unseen: An Exploration of Conscious and Unconscious Vision.Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Vision, more than any other sense, dominates our mental life. Our visual experience is just so rich, so detailed, that we can hardly distinguish that experience from the world itself. Even when we just think about the world and don't look at it directly, we can't help but 'imagine' what it looks like. We think of 'seeing' as being a conscious activity--we direct our eyes, we choose what we look at, we register what we are seeing. The series of events (...)
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  36. A TMS Study of the Ventral Projections From V1 with Implications for the Finding of Neural Correlates of Consciousness.Morten Overgaard, Jorgen Feldbaek Nielsen & Anders Fuglsang-Frederiksen - 2004 - Brain and Cognition 54 (1):58-64.
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  37. Parallel Visual Pathways From the Retina to the Visual Cortex – How Do They Fit?Luiz Carlos L. Silveira - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):50-51.
    Which roles are played by subcortical pathways in models of cortical streams for visual processing? Through their thalamic relays, magnocellular (M) and parvocellular (P) projecting ganglion cells send complementary signals to V1, where their outputs are combined in several different ways. The synergic role of M and P cells in vision can be understood by estimating cell response entropy in all domains of interest.
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  38. Conscious Visual Abilities in a Patient with Early Bilateral Occipital Damage.Deborah Giaschi, James E. Jan, Bruce Bjornson, Simon Au Young, Matthew Tata, Christopher J. Lyons, William V. Good & Peter K. H. Wong - 2003 - Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology 45 (11):772-781.
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  39. Opposing Basal Ganglia Processes Shape Midbrain Visuomotor Activity Bilaterally.Huai Jiang, Barry E. Stein & John G. McHaffie - 2003 - Nature 423:982-986.
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  40. New Support for the Perceptual Activity Theory of Mental Imagery.Nigel J. T. Thomas - 2003
    Since the publication of my "Are Theories of Imagery Theories of Imagination? An _Active Perception_ Approach to Conscious Mental Content,", a good deal of published material has appeared or has come to my attention that either provides additional support for the Perceptual Activity Theory PA theory) of mental imagery presented in ATOITOI, or that throws further doubt on the rival theories that are criticized there. Other relevant evidence was not mentioned in ATOITOI because I lacked the space for a proper (...)
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  41. The Grand Illusion and Petit Illusions: Interactions of Perception and Sensory Coding.Bruce Bridgeman - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5-6):29-34.
    The Grand Illusion, the experience of a rich phenomenal visual world supported by a poor internal representation of that world, is echoed by petit illusions of the same sort. We can be aware of several aspects of an object or pattern, even when they are inconsistent with one another, because different neurological mechanisms code the various aspects separately. They are bound not by an internal linkage, but by the structure of the world itself. Illusions exploit this principle by introducing inconsistencies (...)
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  42. The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect.Hans-Otto Karnath, David Milner & Giuseppe Vallar (eds.) - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Spatial neglect is a disorder of space-related behaviour. It is characterized by failure to explore the side of space contralateral to a brain lesion, or to react or respond to stimuli or subjects located on this side. Research on spatial neglect and related disorders has developed rapidly inrecent years. These advances have been made as a result of neuropsychological studies of patients with brain damage, behavioural studies of animal models, as well as through functional neurophysiological experiments and functional neuroimaging.The Cognitive (...)
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  43. Cortical Substrates of Visuospatial Awareness Outside the Classical Dorsal Stream of Visual Processing.Peter Thier, Thomas Haarmeier, Subhojit Chakraborty, Axel Lindner & Alexander Tikhonov - 2002 - In Hans-Otto Karnath, David Milner & Giuseppe Vallar (eds.), The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect. Oxford University Press. pp. 71-81.
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  44. Visual Extinction and Awareness: The Importance of Binding Dorsal and Ventral Pathways.Gordon C. Baylis, Christopher L. Gore, P. Dennis Rodriguez & Rebecca J. Shisler - 2001 - Visual Cognition. Special Issue 8 (3):359-379.
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  45. Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes.Beatrice de Gelder, Edward de Haan & Charles Heywood (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Can we learn without consciousness? When the eminent neuropsychologist, Lawrence Weiskrantz first coined the term 'blindsight' to describe a condition whereby a patient could demonstrate that they were aware of some object, yet insist that they were completely unaware of its existence, the response from some in the scientific community was one of extreme skepticism. Even now, there are those who question the existence of unconscious learning, and the topic remains one of the most actively researched and debated in psychology. (...)
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  46. Visual Awareness and the on-Line Modification of Action.Jillian H. Fecteau, Romeo Chua, Ian Franks & James T. Enns - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (2):104-110.
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  47. Real Action in a Virtual World.Melvyn A. Goodale - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):984-985.
    O'Regan & Noë run into some difficulty in trying to reconcile their “seeing as acting” proposal with the perception and action account of the functions of the two streams of visual projections in the primate cerebral cortex. I suggest that part of the problem is their reluctance to acknowledge that the mechanisms in the ventral stream may play a more critical role in visual awareness and qualia than mechanisms in the dorsal stream.
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  48. Direct and Indirect Visuals Routes to Action.A. David Milner & H. Chris Dijkerman - 2001 - In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. pp. 241-264.
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  49. Interactions Between Vision for Perception and Vision for Behavior.Bruce Bridgeman - 2000 - In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.
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  50. Space in the Brain: Different Neural Substrates for Allocentric and Egocentric Frames of Reference.Melvyn A. Goodale & K. Murphy - 2000 - In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press.
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