This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related

Contents
100 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 100
  1. مزرعة البشر ... أزمة كورونا من السيمياء إلى عصر العبيد الرقمي.Salah Osman - manuscript
    وفقًا لأحدث التقارير، هناك أكثر من مائة وأربعين تركيبة كيميائية تخضع الآن للتجارب على مستويات مختلفة، كما استثمرت الحكومات والمؤسسات الكبرى مثل مؤسسة «بيل وميليندا جيتس» مليارات الدولارات لتمويل البحث عن «الرصاصة الفضية» Silver Bullet السحرية التي من شأنها القضاء على الفيروس العنيف والمُراوغ. وما زالت كثرة من البروتوكولات المتعلقة بتطوير اللقاح المُنتظر – ونتائج تجاربها على البشر – مُحاطة بالسرية في ظل التنافس المحموم على أخذ زمام المبادرة.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. An ethical analysis of vaccinating children against COVID-19: benefits, risks, and issues of global health equity [version 2; peer review: 1 approved, 1 approved with reservations].Rachel Gur-Arie, Steven R. Kraaijeveld & Euzebiusz Jamrozik - forthcoming - Wellcome Open Research.
    COVID-19 vaccination of children has begun in various high-income countries with regulatory approval and general public support, but largely without careful ethical consideration. This trend is expected to extend to other COVID-19 vaccines and lower ages as clinical trials progress. This paper provides an ethical analysis of COVID-19 vaccination of healthy children. Specifically, we argue that it is currently unclear whether routine COVID-19 vaccination of healthy children is ethically justified in most contexts, given the minimal direct benefit that COVID-19 vaccination (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Vaccine ethics: an ethical framework for global distribution of COVID-19 vaccines.Nancy S. Jecker, Aaron G. Wightman & Douglas S. Diekema - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    This paper addresses the just distribution of vaccines against the SARS-CoV-2 virus and sets forth an ethical framework that prioritises frontline and essential workers, people at high risk of severe disease or death, and people at high risk of infection. Section I makes the case that vaccine distribution should occur at a global level in order to accelerate development and fair, efficient vaccine allocation. Section II puts forth ethical values to guide vaccine distribution including helping people with the greatest need, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  4. Sociocultural and moral narratives influencing the decision to vaccinate among rheumatic disease patients: a qualitative study.Amaranta Manrique de Lara - forthcoming - Clinical Rheumatology.
    Introduction/objectives Vaccination is a process that involves individual, social, and ethical aspects, beyond public governance of vaccines or vaccination as a public health concern. The aim of this study is to describe the sociocultural and moral narratives that influence the decision to vaccinate in general and to vaccinate against COVID-19 specifically, among patients at the rheumatology units of two hospitals. Methods Qualitative study involving individual semi-structured interviews following an interview guide. We conducted a thematic analysis using the ATLAS.ti software, with (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Clinical ethics: Consent for vaccination in children.Dominic Wilkinson & Antonia McBride - forthcoming - Archives of Disease in Childhood.
    The prospect of vaccinating children and young people (CYP) against COVID raises questions that apply more widely to vaccination in children. When can CYP consent, on their own, for vaccination? What should happen if children and their parents disagree about the desirability of a vaccine? When, if ever, should vaccination proceed despite a child’s dissent or apparent refusal? A range of ethical dilemmas may arise. (Box 1) In this article, we will address general ethical issues relating to consent for vaccination, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Blaming the unvaccinated during the COVID-19 pandemic: the roles of political ideology and risk perceptions in the USA.Maja Graso, Karl Aquino, Fan Xuan Chen & Kevin Bardosh - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (4):246-252.
    Individuals unvaccinated against COVID-19 (C19) experienced prejudice and blame for the pandemic. Because people vastly overestimate C19 risks, we examined whether these negative judgements could be partially understood as a form of scapegoating (ie, blaming a group unfairly for an undesirable outcome) and whether political ideology (previously shown to shape risk perceptions in the USA) moderates scapegoating of the unvaccinated. We grounded our analyses in scapegoating literature and risk perception during C19. We obtained support for our speculations through two vignette-based (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Key Ethical Issues Related to Covid 19 Vaccination: Personal Choice Vs. Greater Public Welfare and Informed Consent (2nd edition).Akram Almatarneh - 2023 - Journal of Legal, Ethical and Regulatory Issues 27 (2):1-13.
    Vaccination against various diseases has been widely practised for more than a century and on a more limited scale its use in a variety of forms stretches back far longer. During earlier eras disease spread more slowly along shipping lanes on water and traditional transport routes on land. Today, in an era of air transport, contagion spreads far more rapidly. Travelling far more rapidly (indeed instantaneously) is the spread of misinformation that hinders vaccination which can, in the instance of Covid-19, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Unveiling the interplay between evidence, values and cognitive biases. The case of the failure of the AstraZeneca COVID‐19 vaccine.Cristina Amoretti & Elisabetta Lalumera - 2023 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 1.
  9. Herd immunity, vaccination and moral obligation.Matthew Bullen, George S. Heriot & Euzebiusz Jamrozik - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (9):636-641.
    The public health benefits of herd immunity are often used as the justification for coercive vaccine policies. Yet, ‘herd immunity’ as a term has multiple referents, which can result in ambiguity, including regarding its role in ethical arguments. The term ‘herd immunity’ can refer to (1) the herd immunity threshold, at which models predict the decline of an epidemic; (2) the percentage of a population with immunity, whether it exceeds a given threshold or not; and/or (3) the indirect benefit afforded (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Non-Consensual Vaccination and Medical Harassment: Giving Vaccine Refusers Their Due.Mihnea D. I. Capraru - 2023 - Journal of Controversial Ideas 3 (1):1-8.
    This article argues that non-consensual vaccination is morally impermissible, for the same reasons for which sexual assault is not permissible. Likewise, mandatory vaccination is morally akin to sexual harassment, and therefore is not to be allowed.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. A Gadamerian Approach to Epistemic Injustice: Bearing Witness to the Vaccine Injured.Alexander Crist - 2023 - Meta: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical Philosophy 15 (2):387-414.
    In a recent article, ―The Lacuna of Hermeneutics: Notes on the Freedom of Thought, Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback raises an important question regarding the limitations of philosophical hermeneutics to be critical and attentive to the reality of current, concrete socio-political issues. In response, I claim that Gadamerian hermeneutics is well positioned to address current and controversial instances of epistemic injustice. In this article, I focus on the contemporary and controversial example of testimony of those who have been injured by the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. ‘VaxTax’: a follow-up proposal for a global vaccine pandemic response fund.Federico Germani, Felicitas Holzer, Ivette Ortiz, Nikola Biller-Andorno & Julian W. März - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (3):160-164.
    Equal access to vaccines has been one of the key ethical challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. Most scholars consider the massive purchase and hoarding of vaccines by high-income countries, especially at the beginning of the pandemic, to be unjust towards the vulnerable living in low-income countries. A recent proposal by Andreas Albertsen of a vaccine tax has been put forward to remedy this problem. Under such a scheme, high-income countries would pay a contribution, conceptualised as a vaccine tax, dedicated to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. COVID-19 Vaccination under Conditions of War in Ukraine.Olena Korolchuk, Nataliia Vasiuk, Iryna Klymkova, Dmytro Shvets & Oleksii Piddubnyi - 2023 - Asian Bioethics Review 15 (3):259-281.
    The COVID-19 pandemic, which spread around the world in 2020, changed the lives of millions of people and affected the life and functioning of all countries and people without exception. With the emergence of the opportunity to be vaccinated against COVID-19, the problem of making a decision about vaccination also appeared. But it has become increasingly clear that the coronavirus is moving into the group of annual viral epidemic diseases that occur every year in different countries during the seasonal wave (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. On the Concept and Ethics of Vaccination for the Sake of Others.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - 2023 - Dissertation, Wageningen University and Research
    This dissertation explores the idea and ethics of vaccination for the sake of others. It conceptually distinguishes four different kinds of vaccination—self-protective, paternalistic, altruistic, and indirect—based on who receives the primary benefits of vaccination and who ultimately makes the vaccination decision. It describes the results of focus group studies that were conducted to investigate what people who might get vaccinated altruistically think of this idea. It also applies the different kinds of vaccination to ethical issues surrounding COVID-19, such as lockdown (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. School staff as vaccine advocates: Perspectives on vaccine mandates and the student registration process.Mark Christopher Navin, Aaron Scherer, Ethan Bradley & Katie Attwell - 2023 - Vaccine 41 (5):1169-1175.
    Recently, several states in the US have made it more difficult to receive nonmedical exemptions to school vaccine mandates in the hope of better orienting parents towards vaccination. However, little is known about how public-facing school staff implement and enforce mandate policies, including why or how often they steer parents towards nonmedical exemptions. This study focused on Michigan, which has recently added an additional burden for families seeking nonmedical exemptions. We used an anonymous online survey to assess Michigan public-school employees (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Equitable global allocation of monkeypox vaccines.G. Owen Schaefer, Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Caesar A. Atuire, R. J. Leland, Govind Persad, Henry S. Richardson & Carla Saenz - 2023 - Vaccine 41 (48):7084-7088.
    With the world grappling with continued spread of monkeypox internationally, vaccines play a crucial role in mitigating the harms from infection and preventing spread. However, countries with the greatest need - particularly historically endemic countries with the highest monkeypox case-fatality rates - are not able to acquire scarce vaccines. This is unjust, and requires rectification through equitable allocation of vaccines globally. We propose applying the Fair Priority Model for such allocation, which emphasizes three key principles: 1) preventing harm; 2) prioritizing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. When Adolescents Disagree with Their Vaccine-Hesitant Parents about COVID-19 Vaccination.Jana Shaw, Y. Tony Yang & Robert S. Olick - 2023 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 34 (2):158-168.
    As we journey into the fourth year of the COVID-19 pandemic, a majority of Americans express relief at a “return to normal,” experience pandemic fatigue, or embrace the idea of living with COVID-19 in much the same way we live with the seasonal flu. But transition to a new phase of life with SARS-CoV-2 does not diminish the importance of vaccination. The US Centers for Disease Control and the Food and Drug Administration recently recommended another round of booster dose for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Vaccine Refusal Is Still Not Free Riding.Ethan Bradley & Mark Navin - 2022 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 14 (2).
    In a recent article, "Can One Both Contribute to and Benefit from Herd Immunity?", Lucie White argues that vaccine refusal is more like free riding than we have claimed that it is. Here, we critically reply to White’s arguments.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. Infectious Disease Spreading Fought by Multiple Vaccines Having a Prescribed Time Effect.Mauro Garavello & Rinaldo M. Colombo - 2022 - Acta Biotheoretica 71 (1):1-26.
    We propose a framework for the description of the effects of vaccinations on the spreading of an epidemic disease. Different vaccines can be dosed, each providing different immunization times and immunization levels. Differences due to individuals’ ages are accounted for through the introduction of either a continuous age structure or a discrete set of age classes. Extensions to gender differences or to distinguish fragile individuals can also be considered. Within this setting, vaccination strategies can be simulated, tested and compared, as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Uncertainty, Vaccination, and the Duties of Liberal States.Pei-Hua Huang - 2022 - In Matthew Dennis, Georgy Ishmaev, Steven Umbrello & Jeroen van den Hoven (eds.), The Values for a Post-Pandemic Future. Cham: pp. 97-110.
    It is widely accepted that a liberal state has a general duty to protect its people from undue health risks. However, the unprecedented emergent measures against the COVID-19 pandemic taken by governments worldwide give rise to questions regarding the extent to which this duty may be used to justify suspending a vaccine rollout on marginal safety grounds. -/- In this chapter, I use the case of vaccination to argue that while a liberal state has a general duty to protect its (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Alternative Protection of Intellectual Property Rights in Vaccine Production and Use under Covid-19.Ling Jin - 2022 - Journal of Education, Humanities and Social Sciences 1 (1):147-153.
    For the past three years, Coronavirus-19 (Covid-19) has become one of the major global health problems. Unlike any previous virus in the past decades, Covid-19 has shown its unprecedented spreading speed, infection rate, fatality rate, etc. Under this urgent disease outbursting event, scientists around the globe, through the myriad of research and experiments, successfully developed effective vaccines. However, like many other medical innovations, Covid-19 vaccines are categorized as intellectual properties and a scarce resource. As a consequence, the citizens of developed (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. The Role of General Attitudes and Perceptions Towards Vaccination on the Newly-Developed Vaccine: Results From a Survey on COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance in China.Rize Jing, Hai Fang, Hufeng Wang & Jiahao Wang - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    BackgroundVaccination has been considered one of the most effective public health interventions. In the context of the global epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019, it remains unclear what role general vaccination attitudes and perceptions have on the acceptance of COVID-19 vaccine.ObjectiveThis study aims to explore the impact of general attitudes and perceptions toward vaccination on the acceptance of a newly developed vaccine, taking COVID-19 vaccines as an example.MethodA cross-sectional survey was conducted among 2,013 Chinese adult participants. Generalized order logistic regression and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Listening to vaccine refusers.Kaisa Kärki - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):3-9.
    In bioethics vaccine refusal is often discussed as an instance of free riding on the herd immunity of an infectious disease. However, the social science of vaccine refusal suggests that the reasoning behind refusal to vaccinate more often stems from previous negative experiences in healthcare practice as well as deeply felt distrust of healthcare institutions. Moreover, vaccine refusal often acts like an exit mechanism. Whilst free riding is often met with sanctions, exit, according to Albert Hirschman’s theory of exit and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24. Youtube as a Source of Information About Coronavirus Disease 2019 Vaccine.Erhan Kaya, Mikail Özdemir, Hüseyin Üçer & Burhan Fatih Koçyiğit - 2022 - Central Asian Journal of Medical Hypotheses and Ethics 3 (3):170-175.
    Introduction: YouTube is a very important source of information. The videos in YouTube provide a message with information. The purpose of this article was to assess the main message of available materials about coronavirus disease 2019 vaccines on YouTube. Methods: In this study, the four search terms "COVID-19 vaccine", "COVID-19 vaccination", "Coronavirus vaccine", "Coronavirus vaccination" were scanned on the YouTube media platform on 9 February 2021. We examined video parameters i.e., durations, view counts, likes, dislikes, comments, messages and sources of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. COVID-19 Vaccination Behavior Among Frontline Healthcare Workers in Pakistan: The Theory of Planned Behavior, Perceived Susceptibility, and Anticipated Regret.Muhammad Khayyam, Shuai Chuanmin, Muhammad Asad Salim, Arjumand Nizami, Jawad Ali, Hussain Ali, Nawab Khan, Muhammad Ihtisham & Raheel Anjum - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Healthcare workers in Pakistan are still fighting at the frontline to control the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 and have been identified as the earliest beneficiaries for COVID-19 vaccination by the health authorities of the country. Besides, the high vaccination rates of frontline healthcare workers are essential to overcome the ongoing pandemic and reduce the vaccines hesitancy among the general population. The current research employed the theory of planned behavior to investigate the COVID-19 vaccination behavior among FHWs in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Understanding Islamic law in the context of vaccination: Reducing the doubt cast on COVID-19 vaccines.Kosim Kosim - 2022 - HTS Theological Studies 78 (4):1–7.
    One solution to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is getting vaccinated. The promotion of vaccines through religion helps to control the pandemic. One of the causes of doubts about vaccination in society is religious understanding. Vaccination has an important correlation with Islamic law or Islamic jurisprudence. This research aims to analyse the effect of understanding Islamic law on doubts about vaccination. This research used quantitative pre-experimental designs. The research sample consisted of 160 people who were not vaccinated. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. The Ethical Significance of Post-Vaccination COVID-19 Transmission Dynamics.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 20 (1):21-29.
    The potential for vaccines to prevent the spread of infectious diseases is crucial for vaccination policy and ethics. In this paper, I discuss recent evidence that the current COVID-19 vaccines have only a modest and short-lived effect on reducing SARS-CoV-2 transmission and argue that this has at least four important ethical implications. First, getting vaccinated against COVID-19 should be seen primarily as a self-protective choice for individuals. Second, moral condemnation of unvaccinated people for causing direct harm to others is unjustified. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. Against COVID‐19 vaccination of healthy children.Steven R. Kraaijeveld, Rachel Gur-Arie & Euzebiusz Jamrozik - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (6):687-698.
  29. Altruistic Vaccination: Insights from Two Focus Group Studies.Steven R. Kraaijeveld & Bob C. Mulder - 2022 - Health Care Analysis 30 (3):275-295.
    Vaccination can protect vaccinated individuals and often also prevent them from spreading disease to other people. This opens up the possibility of getting vaccinated for the sake of others. In fact, altruistic vaccination has recently been conceptualized as a kind of vaccination that is undertaken primary for the benefit of others. In order to better understand the potential role of altruistic motives in people’s vaccination decisions, we conducted two focus group studies with a total of 37 participants. Study 1 included (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30. Does the light at the end of the tunnel shine for everyone? The need for early paediatric participation in vaccine trials during infectious pandemics.Erin M. Kwolek - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (4):346-351.
    While most of the mortality associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has been in elderly populations and adults with significant medical comorbidities, there has been death and morbidity in paediatric populations. As vaccine trial data is released to the public, many people look to the future with hope ; with good vaccine uptake there is the opportunity to reduce the spread of infectious pandemics. Initial vaccine trials were completed with adults and were expanded to include paediatric populations delaying (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. The Joint Effects of Social Norm Appeals and Fear Appeals in COVID-19 Vaccine Campaign Posters on Self-Perceived Communication Quality and Vaccination Intention.Jiawei Liu, Xiaobing Yang, Yanqin Lu & Xia Zheng - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    To understand how different types of cues in vaccine education messages affect attitude toward campaign messages and vaccination intention, this study examined the impact of the presence of social norm appeals and the presence of fear appeals in coronavirus disease 2019 vaccine campaign posters on perceived communication quality and vaccination intention. A 2 × 2 × 3 within-subject factorial design experiment was conducted in China. Findings demonstrated that the presence of fear appeals in COVID-19 vaccine campaign posters elicited lower levels (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Innovations from the Levant: smallpox inoculation and perceptions of scientific medicine.Victoria N. Meyer - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (4):423-444.
    Modern public-health initiatives in industrialized countries revolve around immunization against contagious diseases. The practice of engendering immunity against disease through disease first emerged in Western European social and medical landscapes in the eighteenth century as inoculation, based on the imported Middle Eastern practice of ‘engrafting’. By the nineteenth century, this practice had evolved into the procedure of vaccination, in the first instance directed against smallpox. Popular and academic narratives thus often categorize inoculation as a procedure from the Middle East which (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. An Epidemic Model with Pro and Anti-vaccine Groups.L. H. A. Monteiro & G. S. Harari - 2022 - Acta Biotheoretica 70 (3):1-13.
    Here, an epidemiological model considering pro and anti-vaccination groups is proposed and analyzed. In this model, susceptible individuals can migrate between these two groups due to the influence of false and true news about safety and efficacy of vaccines. From this model, written as a set of three ordinary differential equations, analytical expressions for the disease-free steady state, the endemic steady state, and the basic reproduction number are derived. It is analytically shown that low vaccination rate and no influx to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Case for persuasion in parental informed consent to promote rational vaccine choices.Jennifer O'Neill - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (2):106-111.
    There have been calls for mandatory vaccination legislation to be introduced into the UK in order to tackle the national and international rise of vaccine-preventable disease. While some countries have had some success associated with mandatory vaccination programmes, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health insist this is not a suitable option for the UK, a country which has seen historical opposition to vaccine mandates. There is a lack of comprehensive data to demonstrate a direct link between mandatory vaccination (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Reserve system design for allocation of scarce medical resources in a pandemic: some perspectives from the field.Parag Pathak, Govind Persad, Tayfun Sönmez & M. Utku Unver - 2022 - Oxford Review of Economic Policy 38 (4):924–940.
    Reserve systems are a tool to allocate scarce resources when stakeholders do not have a single objective. This paper introduces some basic concepts about reserve systems for pandemic medical resource allocation. At the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, we proposed that reserve systems can help practitioners arrive at compromises between competing stakeholders. More than a dozen states and local jurisdictions adopted reserve systems in initial phases of vaccine distribution. We highlight several design issues arising in some of these implementations. We (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Equal Protection and Scarce Therapies: The Role of Race, Sex, and Other Protected Classifications.Govind Persad - 2022 - Smu Law Review Forum 75:226.
    The allocation of scarce medical treatments, such as antivirals and antibody therapies for COVID-19 patients, has important legal dimensions. This Essay examines a currently debated issue: how will courts view the consideration of characteristics shielded by equal protection law, such as race, sex, age, health, and even vaccination status, in allocation? Part II explains the application of strict scrutiny to allocation criteria that consider individual race, which have been recently debated, and concludes that such criteria are unlikely to succeed under (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Considering Vaccination Status.Govind Persad - 2022 - Hastings Law Journal 74:399.
    This Article examines whether policies—sometimes termed “vaccine mandates” or “vaccine requirements”— that consider vaccination status as a condition of employment, receipt of goods and services, or educational or other activity for participation are legally permitted, and whether such policies may even sometimes be legally required. It does so with particular reference to COVID-19 vaccines. -/- Part I explains the legality of private actors, such as employers or private universities, considering vaccination status, and concludes that such consideration is almost always legally (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. COVID-19 Vaccine Refusal and Fair Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources.Govind Persad & Emily A. Largent - 2022 - JAMA Health Forum 3 (4):e220356.
    When hospitals face surges of patients with COVID-19, fair allocation of scarce medical resources remains a challenge. Scarcity has at times encompassed not only hospital and intensive care unit beds—often reflecting staffing shortages—but also therapies and intensive treatments. Safe, highly effective COVID-19 vaccines have been free and widely available since mid-2021, yet many Americans remain unvaccinated by choice. Should their decision to forgo vaccination be considered when allocating scarce resources? Some have suggested it should, while others disagree. We offer a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. COVID-19 vaccine boosters for all adults: An optimal U.s. approach?Ameet Sarpatwari, Ankur Pandya, Emily P. Hyle & Govind Persad - 2022 - Annals of Internal Medicine 175 (2):280-282.
    By 20 October 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had amended its Emergency Use Authorizations for immunocompetent adults who previously received the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. For the 2-dose Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, the FDA permitted a single booster dose for adults aged 65 years or older and adults aged 18 to 64 years at high-risk for severe COVID-19 or at high risk for occupational or institutional COVID-19 exposure. For the single-dose Johnson & Johnson (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. Priority vaccination for mental illness, developmental or intellectual disability.Nina Shevzov-Zebrun & Arthur L. Caplan - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (8):510-511.
    Coronavirus vaccines have made their debut. Now, allocation practices have stepped into the spotlight. Following Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, states and healthcare institutions initially prioritised healthcare personnel and elderly residents of congregant facilities; other groups at elevated risk for severe complications are now becoming eligible through locally administered programmes. The question remains, however: whoelseshould be prioritised for immunisation? Here, we call attention to individuals institutionalised with severe mental illnesses and/or developmental or intellectual disabilities—a group highly susceptible to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. We Charge Vaccine Apartheid?Matiangai Sirleaf - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (4):726-737.
    Vaccine apartheid is creating conditions that make for premature death, poverty, and disease in racialized ways. Invoking vaccine apartheid as opposed to euphemisms like vaccine nationalism, is necessary to highlight the racialized distributional consequences of vaccine inequities witnessed with COVID-19. This commentary clarifies the concept of vaccine apartheid against the historical and legal usage of apartheid. It reflects on the connections and important disjunctions between the two. It places the intellectual property regime under heightened scrutiny for reform and transformation. This (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. ‘A remedy for this dread disease’: Achille Sclavo, anthrax and serum therapy in early twentieth-century Britain.James F. Stark - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Science 55 (2):207-226.
    In the years around 1900 one of the most significant practical consequences of new styles of bacteriological thought and practice was the development of preventive vaccines and therapeutic sera. Historical scholarship has highlighted how approaches rooted in the laboratory methods of Robert Koch, Louis Pasteur and their collaborators were transformed in local contexts and applied in diverse ways to enable more effective disease identification, prevention and treatment. Amongst these, the anti-anthrax serum developed by the Italian physician Achille Sclavo (1861–1930) has (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Dose optimisation and scarce resource allocation: two sides of the same coin.Garth Strohbehn, Govind Persad, William F. Parker & Srinivas Murthy - 2022 - BMJ Open 12 (10):e063436.
    Objective: A deep understanding of the relationship between a scarce drug's dose and clinical response is necessary to appropriately distribute a supply-constrained drug along these lines. Summary of key data: The vast majority of drug development and repurposing during the COVID-19 pandemic – an event that has made clear the ever-present scarcity in healthcare systems –has been ignorant of scarcity and dose optimisation's ability to help address it. Conclusions: Future pandemic clinical trials systems should obtain dose optimisation data, as these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. A critical review analysis of the issues arising out of the clinical practice by an infected health care worker.Raghvendra K. Vidua, Nisha Dubey, Punit Kumar Agarwal, Daideepya C. Bhargava & Parthasarathi Pramanik - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (2):113-117.
    The way communicable diseases do spread from one person to another, depending upon the specific disease or causative infectious agent. Out of these diseases, some are incurable and the health care workers during their practice or otherwise acquire such infections and transmit them further to innocent patients who are unaware of about the health status of health care workers. The rights of an infected health care worker and patients are protected by many laws but in case of conflict of interests (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Value choices in European COVID-19 vaccination schedules: how vaccination prioritization differs from other forms of priority setting.Karolina Wiśniowska, Tomasz Żuradzki & Wojciech Ciszewski - 2022 - Journal of Law and the Biosciences 9 (2):lsac026.
    With the limited initial availability of COVID-19 vaccines in the first months of 2021, decision-makers had to determine the order in which different groups were prioritized. Our aim was to find out what normative approaches to the allocation of scarce preventive resources were embedded in the national COVID-19 vaccination schedules. We systematically reviewed and compared prioritization regulations in 27 members of the European Union, the United Kingdom, and Israel. We differentiated between two types of priority categories: groups that have increased (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Vaccine Refusal Is Not Free Riding.Ethan Bradley & Mark Navin - 2021 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 14 (1).
    Vaccine refusal is not a free rider problem. The claim that vaccine refusers are free riders is inconsistent with the beliefs and motivations of most vaccine refusers. This claim also inaccurately depicts the relationship between an individual’s immunization choice, their ability to enjoy the benefits of community protection, and the costs and benefits that individuals experience from immunization and community protection. Modeling vaccine refusers as free riders also likely distorts the ethical analysis of vaccine refusal and may lead to unsuccessful (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  47. Love thy neighbour? Allocating vaccines in a world of competing obligations.Kyle Ferguson & Arthur Caplan - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):e20-e20.
    Although a safe, effective, and licensed coronavirus vaccine does not yet exist, there is already controversy over how it ought to be allocated. Justice is clearly at stake, but it is unclear what justice requires in the international distribution of a scarce vaccine during a pandemic. Many are condemning ‘vaccine nationalism’ as an obstacle to equitable global distribution. We argue that limited national partiality in allocating vaccines will be a component of justice rather than an obstacle to it. For there (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48. Phantom premise and a shape-shifting ism: reply to Hassoun.Kyle Ferguson & Arthur Caplan - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (11).
    In ‘Against vaccine nationalism’, Nicole Hassoun misrepresents our argument, distorts our position and ignores crucial distinctions we present in our article, ‘Love thy neighbor? Allocating vaccines in a world of competing obligations’. She has created a strawman that does not resemble our position. In this reply, we address two features of ‘Against vaccine nationalism’. First, we address a phantom premise. Hassoun misattributes to us a thesis, according to which citizen-directed duties are stronger than noncitizen-directed duties. This thesis is a figment (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. COVID-19 Pandemic Worry and Vaccination Intention: The Mediating Role of the Health Belief Model Components.Claudia I. Iacob, Daniela Ionescu, Eugen Avram & Daniel Cojocaru - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Given the negative consequences of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic on public health, his study aimed at investigating: the differences between adults with and without chronic illness in buying behavior, vaccination intention, pandemic worry, and the health belief model components; the HBM components as mediators of the relationship between pandemic worry and vaccination intention. The sample consisted of 864 adults, of which 20.5% reported having a chronic illness. Associations between pandemic worry, vaccination intention, and HBM were ascertained using correlation and mediation (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Out of Africa: A Solidarity‐Based Approach to Vaccine Allocation.Nancy Jecker & Caesar Atuire - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (3):27-36.
    This article sets forth a solidaristic approach to global distribution of vaccines against the SARS‐CoV‐2 virus. Our approach draws inspiration from African ethics and from the characterization of the Covid‐19 crisis as a syndemic, a convergence of biosocial forces that interact with one another to produce and exacerbate clinical disease and prognosis. The first section elaborates the twin ideas of syndemic and solidarity. The second section argues that these ideas lend support to global health alliances to distribute vaccines beyond national (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
1 — 50 / 100