Results for 'Erin I. Castellas'

986 found
Order:
  1.  19
    Responding to Value Pluralism in Hybrid Organizations.Erin I. Castellas, Wendy Stubbs & Véronique Ambrosini - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (3):635-650.
    In this paper, we derive a four-stage process model of how hybrid organizations respond to specific challenges that arise under conditions of value pluralism and institutional complexity. Engaging in exploratory qualitative research of six Australian hybrid organizations, we identify institutional and organizational responses to pluralism, particularly as organizations strive to uphold multiple value commitments, such as social, environmental and/or financial outcomes. We find that by employing a process of separating, negotiating, aggregating, and subjectively assessing the value that is created, our (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The naturalist gap in ethics.Erin I. Kelly & Lionel K. McPherson - 2010 - In Mario De Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Cambridge University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  18
    A Tale of Two Perspectives: How Psychology and Neuroscience Contribute to Understanding Personhood.Erin I. Smith - 2021 - Scientia et Fides 9 (2):35-53.
    Empirical science, such as psychology and neuroscience, employ diverse methods to develop data driven models and explanations for complex phenomena. In research on the self, differences in these methods produce different depictions of persons. Research in developmental psychology highlights the role of intuitive beliefs, such as psychological essentialism and intuitive dualism, in individuals’ singular, cohesive, and stable sense of self. On the other hand, research in neuroscience highlights the de-centralized, distributed, multitudes of neural networks in competition making selves, with arguments (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Stability and Justification in Hume’s Treatise, Another Look- A Response to Erin Kelly, Frederick Schmitt, and Michael Williams.Erin I. Kelly - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):339-404.
    Hume’s moral philosophy is a sentiment-based view. Moral judgment is a matter of the passions; certain traits of character count as virtues or vices because of the approval or disapproval they evoke in us, feelings that express concern we have about the social effects of these traits. A sentiment-based approach is attractive, since morality seems fundamentally to involve caring for other people. Sentiment-based views, however, face a real challenge. It is clear that our affections are often particular; we favor certain (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  5. Criminal Justice without Retribution.Erin I. Kelly - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy 106 (8):440-462.
  6.  72
    The Ethics of Law’s Authority: On Tommie Shelby's, Dark Ghettos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform.Erin I. Kelly - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (1):1-12.
    Tommie Shelby argues that social injustice undermines the moral standing states would have, were they just, to condemn criminal wrongdoers. He makes a good argument, but he does not go far enough to reject the blaming function of punishment. Shelby’s argument from “impure dissent,” in particular, helps to demonstrate the limits of blame in criminal justice.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  83
    The Historical Injustice Problem for Political Liberalism.Erin I. Kelly - 2017 - Ethics 128 (1):75-94.
    Liberal political philosophers have underestimated the philosophical relevance of historical injustice. For some groups, injustices from the past—particularly surrounding race, ethnicity, or religion—are a source of entrenched social inequality decades or even hundreds of years later. Rawls does not advocate the importance of redressing historical injustice, yet political liberalism needs a principle of historical redress. Rawls’s principle of fair equality of opportunity, which is designed to prevent the leveraging of class privilege, could be paired with a supporting principle of historical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  39
    Desert and Fairness in Criminal Justice.Erin I. Kelly - 2012 - Philosophical Topics 40 (1):63-77.
    Moral condemnation has become the public narrative of our criminal justice practices, but the distribution of criminal sanctions is not and should not be guided by judgments of what individual wrongdoers morally deserve. Criteria for evaluating a person’s liability to criminal sanctions are general standards that are influenced by how we understand the relative social urgency and priority of reducing crimes of various types. These standards thus depend on considerations that are not a matter of individual moral desert. Furthermore, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9.  12
    Detecting Temporal Cognition in Text: Comparison of Judgements by Self, Expert and Machine.Erin I. Walsh & Janie Busby Grant - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  15
    Comments on Gideon Yaffe, The Age of Culpability: Children and the Nature of Criminal Responsibility.Erin I. Kelly - 2020 - The Journal of Ethics 24 (3):281-286.
    Gideon Yaffe argues that children should be treated as less culpable by the criminal justice system because children have little political say over the law. I analyze several elements of Yaffe’s argument and express qualified agreement with his thesis. Though I reject the role he assigns to the notions of desert and legal reasons, I agree that people who lack political power are less accountable to the criminal justice system’s legal authorities.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  14
    Accountability in criminal justice.Erin I. Kelly - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Ethical disagreement in theory and practice.Erin I. Kelly - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (3):382–387.
  13.  68
    From Retributive to Restorative Justice.Erin I. Kelly - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (2):237-247.
    I am very grateful to Justin Coates, Adina Roskies, and Costanza Porro for their thoughtful and challenging comments on my book, The Limits of Blame: Rethinking Punishment and Responsibility. My response is organized around their discussion of four main topics: moral competence, proportionality, restorative justice, and excessive punishment.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  39
    Is blame warranted in applying justice?Erin I. Kelly - 2023 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 26 (1):71-87.
    The belief that people convicted of crimes deserve punishment is commonplace. Yet the punitive conception of individual responsibility commonly associated with ‘just deserts’ exaggerates the moral meaning of criminal guilt, normalizes excessive punishment, and distracts from shared responsibility for social injustice. The problem is, many people who get caught up in the criminal justice system cannot reasonably be thought to deserve their fate. Mental illness, intellectual disability, addiction, trauma, and poverty are morally mitigating factors when it comes to assessing how (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  17
    Redress and Reparations for Injurious Wrongs.Erin I. Kelly - 2021 - Law and Philosophy 41 (1):105-125.
    In Recognizing Wrongs, John C. P. Goldberg and Benjamin C. Zipursky develop and defend “civil recourse theory,” according to which torts are injurious wrongs that give rise to a claim of redress. My discussion extends beyond tort law to explore the ethics of reparations for historical injustice, in particular, regarding the case of Black Americans. I begin by relating the notion of wrongdoing that figures prominently in civil recourse theory to morality. Then I explore the idea that the relevant sort (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  1
    13 Against Naturalism in Ethics.Erin I. Kelly - 2004 - In Mario De Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism in Question. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. pp. 259-274.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  4
    Inequality, Difference, and Prospects for Democracy.Erin I. Kelly - 2013 - In Jon Mandle & David A. Reidy (eds.), A Companion to Rawls. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 312–323.
    Rawls's signature is the thought experiment he introduced to sort out the requirements of justice. Rawls argues that “justice as fairness” will be a form of political liberalism. Rawls claims that under free institutions we should expect “profound and irreconcilable differences” in people's religious and philosophical worldviews, and in people's basic notions of what makes life worth living. In his vision of democracy, the solidarity required to support common political values and egalitarian norms of distributive justice must be built through (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  28
    Law and Institutional Legitimacy in the Practice of Human Rights.Erin I. Kelly - 2017 - Law and Philosophy 36 (2):155-168.
    The Heart of Human Rights develops an account of human rights as legal entities that serve important moral purposes in a legitimate international human rights practice. This paper examines Allen Buchanan’s general concept of institutional legitimacy and aims to expand that concept by emphasizing its connection with several ideas developed in the book about the nature and function of a system of international human rights. When it incorporates those ideas, Buchanan’s ‘Metacoordination View’ can be seen to set a standard of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Non-egalitarian global fairness.Erin I. Kelly & Lionel K. McPherson - 2010 - In Alison Jaggar (ed.), Thomas Pogge and His Critics. Malden, MA: Polity.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  67
    Prisoner's mistrust.Erin I. Kelly & Lionel K. McPherson - 2007 - Ratio 20 (1):57–70.
    The standard, non‐repeated prisoner's dilemma poses no true dilemma about rationality, we argue. What the prisoners ought rationally to do, unless they are selfless, depends on the relationship of trust that they have or lack with one another. This helps to diffuse the apparent conflict between individual and collective rationality. If the prisoners have reason to trust one another, pursuing a joint strategy would be rational for them. In the absence of trust, pursuing an individual strategy would be rational. The (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  40
    Rethinking Criminal Justice.Erin I. Kelly - 2020 - Res Philosophica 97 (2):169-183.
    The punitive, moralizing conception of individual responsibility commonly associated with retributive justice exaggerates the moral meaning of criminal guilt. Criminal guilt does not imply moral desert, nor does it justify moral blame. Mental illness, intellectual disability, addiction, immaturity, poverty, and racial oppression are factors that mitigate our sense of a wrongdoer’s moral desert, though they are mostly not treated by the criminal justice system as relevant to criminal culpability. The retributive theory also distracts from shared responsibility for social injustice. Instead (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  50
    Tolerance: Between Forbearance and Acceptance.Erin I. Kelly - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (2):266-269.
    Multiculturalism is not a flag that political philosophers seem eager to wave these days. Conservatives complain about the supposedly hazardous effects of the notion that non-Western societies have ideas and ways of life that are worthy enough to compete with those of Western societies for study and respect. Progressives worry that multiculturalism can be too uncritical of certain non-Western attitudes, especially about the nature and role of women. Perhaps this helps to explain why Hans Oberdiek is reluctant to associate his (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Injustice and the right to punish.Göran Duus-Otterström & Erin I. Kelly - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (2):e12565.
    Injustice can undermine the standing states have to blame criminal offenders, and this raises a difficulty for a range of punishment theories that depend on a state's moral authority. When a state lacks the moral authority that flows from political legitimacy, its right to punish criminal lawbreakers cannot depend on a systematic claim about the legitimacy of the law. Instead, an unjust state is permitted to punish only criminal acts whose wrongness is established directly by morality, and only when criminal (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24. A symposium on Louis E. Loeb, Stability and justification in Hume's treatise.Michael Williams, Frederick F. Schmitt, Erin I. Kelly & Louis E. Loeb - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):265-404.
  25.  13
    The Spirit of Settler Colonialism and the City Streets: A Response to Mishuana Goeman.Erin C. Tarver - 2024 - The Pluralist 19 (1):71-74.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Spirit of Settler Colonialism and the City Streets:A Response to Mishuana GoemanErin C. Tarveri want thank dr. goeman for her excellent paper and for introducing us to these extraordinary artists. Their work is beautiful and important, and I am grateful for the opportunity to witness it and think about it and to consider in particular in its relation to its setting in Los Angeles.In what follows, I want (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  28
    Effective Use of Consent Forms and Interactive Questions in the Consent Process.Barton W. Palmer, Erin L. Cassidy, Laura B. Dunn, Adam P. Spira & Javaid I. Sheikh - 2008 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 30 (2):8.
    Although written consent forms are standard in clinical research, there is little regulatory or empirical guidance regarding how to most effectively review consent forms with potential participants. We developed an algorithm for embedding five questions with corrective feedback while reading consent forms with potential participants, and then applied it in the context of seven clinical research studies. A substantial proportion of participants within each protocol displayed initially inadequate responses to at least one question, but after the protocol elements were explained (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27.  14
    American philosophy: from Wounded Knee to the present.Erin McKenna - 2015 - London: Bloomsbury Academic. Edited by Scott L. Pratt.
    Introduction -- Defining pluralism : Simon Pokagon, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, and Thomas fortune -- Evolution and American Indian philosophy -- Feminist resistance : Anna Julia Cooper, Jane Addams, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman -- Labor, empire and the social gospel : Washington Gladden, Walter Rauschenbusch, and Jane Addams -- A new name for an old way of thinking : William James -- Making ideas clear : Charles Sanders Peirce -- The beloved community and its discontents : Josiah Royce and the realists (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28.  15
    What Does It Mean to Love the Dead?Erin Plunkett - 2024 - In Gustav Strandberg & Hugo Strandberg (eds.), Jan Patočka and the Phenomenology of Life After Death. Springer Verlag. pp. 121-137.
    The question of what it means to love the dead touches both our relationships to specific others and our relationship to history as such. To address the question at the level of the individual, I examine Søren Kierkegaard’s account of loving the dead as a non-reciprocal love that deepens the consciousness of the lover. I then re-examine reciprocity within a phenomenological framework of being for others, specifically Jan Patočka’s account in “Phenomenology of Afterlife”. With a better understanding of what it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. What is a Stereotype? What is Stereotyping?Erin Beeghly - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):675-691.
    If someone says, “Asians are good at math” or “women are empathetic,” I might interject, “you're stereotyping” in order to convey my disapproval of their utterance. But why is stereotyping wrong? Before we can answer this question, we must better understand what stereotypes are and what stereotyping is. In this essay, I develop what I call the descriptive view of stereotypes and stereotyping. This view is assumed in much of the psychological and philosophical literature on implicit bias and stereotyping, yet (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  30.  13
    On the non-propositional content of our ordinary intentions.Xavier Castellà - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations:1-18.
    It is a widely-held thesis that the content of intentions can be characterized in terms of the truth of a proposition. In this paper I try to reject this idea. First, I argue that, at least for ordinary cases of intention, there cannot be any proposition such that the intention is fulfilled if, and only if, such a proposition is true. After that, I propose an alternative account for the content of intentions. I argue that this content must ultimately involve (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Failing to Treat Persons as Individuals.Erin Beeghly - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5.
    If someone says, “You’ve stereotyped me,” we hear the statement as an accusation. One way to interpret the accusation is as follows: you haven’t seen or treated me as an individual. In this essay, I interpret and evaluate a theory of wrongful stereotyping inspired by this thought, which I call the failure-to-individualize theory of wrongful stereotyping. According to this theory, stereotyping is wrong if and only if it involves failing to treat persons as individuals. I argue that the theory—however one (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  32. Bias and Knowledge: Two Metaphors.Erin Beeghly - 2020 - In Erin Beeghly & Alex Madva (eds.), An Introduction to Implicit Bias: Knowledge, Justice, and the Social Mind. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 77-98.
    If you care about securing knowledge, what is wrong with being biased? Often it is said that we are less accurate and reliable knowers due to implicit biases. Likewise, many people think that biases reflect inaccurate claims about groups, are based on limited experience, and are insensitive to evidence. Chapter 3 investigates objections such as these with the help of two popular metaphors: bias as fog and bias as shortcut. Guiding readers through these metaphors, I argue that they clarify the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  33.  29
    About the Scope of Non-Observational Practical Knowledge.Xavier Castellà - 2022 - Res Philosophica 99 (3):339-359.
    I discuss the issue whether the kind of nonobservational knowledge about our intentional actions that can be detected in ideal, paradigmatic cases can also be present when the agent is not confident enough to believe she will succeed in fulfilling her intention. It might be tempting to assume that if the agent’s confidence about what she is doing is relevantly increased after some observation, then the acquired practical knowledge has to be observational. I argue that this is a wrong reaction. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. What’s Wrong with Stereotypes? The Falsity Hypothesis.Erin Beeghly - 2021 - Social Theory and Practice 47 (1):33-61.
    Stereotypes are commonly alleged to be false or inaccurate views of groups. For shorthand, I call this the falsity hypothesis. The falsity hypothesis is widespread and is often one of the first reasons people cite when they explain why we shouldn’t use stereotypic views in cognition, reasoning, or speech. In this essay, I argue against the falsity hypothesis on both empirical and ameliorative grounds. In its place, I sketch a more promising view of stereotypes—which avoids the falsity hypothesis—that joins my (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  49
    The I in Team: Sports Fandom and the Reproduction of Identity.Erin C. Tarver - 2017 - Chicago, IL, USA: University of Chicago Press.
    There is one sound that will always be loudest in sports. It isn’t the squeak of sneakers or the crunch of helmets; it isn’t the grunts or even the stadium music. It’s the deafening roar of sports fans. For those few among us on the outside, sports fandom—with its war paint and pennants, its pricey cable TV packages and esoteric stats reeled off like code—looks highly irrational, entertainment gone overboard. But as Erin C. Tarver demonstrates in this book, sports (...)
  36.  39
    Strategic fouls: a new defense.Erin Flynn - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):342-358.
    Among philosophers, the question about strategic fouls has been whether they are ethically justified in light of our best conception of sport. This paper proposes a different defense. I argue that many strategic fouls should be excused even if we regard them as unjustified. I first lay out a partial defense of the assumptions that playing to win cannot be subordinate to playing skillfully and that winning has value that cannot be accounted for in terms of the skill that produces (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  37. A Humean particularist virtue ethic.Erin Frykholm - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (8):2171-2191.
    Virtue ethical theories typically follow a neo-Aristotelian or quasi-Aristotelian model, making use of various combinations of key features of the Aristotelian model including eudaimonism, perfectionism, an account of practical wisdom, and the thesis of the unity of the virtues. In this paper I motivate what I call a Humean virtue ethic, which is a deeply particularist account of virtue that rejects all of these central tenets, at least in their traditional forms. Focusing on three factors by which Hume determines virtue, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  38. Discrimination & Disrespect.Erin Beeghly - 2017 - In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Ethics of Discrimination. New York: Routledge. pp. 83 - 96.
    In this essay, I explore the view that wrongful discrimination is disrespectful. In section 1, I articulate three conceptions of disrespect, each of which provides a special way to understand the way in which wrongful discrimination is disrespectful. In section 2, I ask what it would take for any of these conceptions to serve as the basis for a plausible theory of wrongful discrimination. I argue that any adequate theory of wrongful discrimination must be able to do two things well: (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. Ownership reasoning in children across cultures.Philippe Rochat, Erin Robbins, Claudia Passos-Ferreira, Angela Donato Oliva, Maria D. G. Dias & Liping Guo - 2014 - Cognition 132 (3):471-484.
    To what extent do early intuitions about ownership depend on cultural and socio-economic circumstances? We investigated the question by testing reasoning about third party ownership conflicts in various groups of three- and five-year-old children (N = 176), growing up in seven highly contrasted social, economic, and cultural circumstances (urban rich, poor, very poor, rural poor, and traditional) spanning three continents. Each child was presented with a series of scripts involving two identical dolls fighting over an object of possession. The child (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  40.  41
    Culture of Disengagement in Engineering Education.Erin A. Cech - 2014 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 39 (1):42-72.
    Much has been made of the importance of training ethical, socially conscious engineers, but does US engineering education actually encourage neophytes to take seriously their professional responsibility to public welfare? Counter to such ideals of engagement, I argue that students’ interest in public welfare concerns may actually decline over the course of their engineering education. Using unique longitudinal survey data of students at four colleges, this article examines (a) how students’ public welfare beliefs change during their engineering education, (b) whether (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  41.  8
    Moral reasoning development: norms for Defining Issue Test-2 (DIT2).Nahide Gungordu, Ghasim Nabizadehchianeh, Erin O’Connor, Wenchao Ma & David I. Walker - 2024 - Ethics and Behavior 34 (4):246-263.
    This article presents normative information for the Defining Issue Test Version 2 (DIT2) schema scores and most common summary scores based on secondary data from the last 10 years DIT2 database (N = 73740, Mage = 23.11, SD = 7.87, the age range in year = 12–95) maintained by the University of Alabama’s Center for the Study of Ethical Development from 2011 to 2020. More specifically, the study provides (1) norms by education; (2) norms by gender and education; and (3) (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  12
    When Dad Stays Home Too: Paternity Leave, Gender, and Parenting.Erin M. Rehel - 2014 - Gender and Society 28 (1):110-132.
    Drawing from 85 semi-structured interviews with fathers and mothers in three cities, I argue that when fathers in heterosexual couples experience the transition to parenthood in ways that are structurally comparable to mothers, they come to think about and enact parenting in ways that are more similar to mothers. I consider the specific role played by extended time off immediately after the birth of a child in structuring that experience. By drawing fathers into the daily realities of child care, free (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Embodiment and Oppression: Reflections on Haslanger, Gender, and Race.Erin Beeghly - 2021 - In Brock Bahler (ed.), The Logic of Racial Practice: Explorations in the Habituation of Racism. Lexington Books. pp. 121-142.
    This chapter is an extended version (almost 2x in length) of an essay first published in Australasian Philosophical Review. -/- Abstract: In On Female Body Experience, Iris Marion Young argues that a central aim of feminist and queer theory is social criticism. The goal is to understand oppression and how it functions: know thy enemy, so as to better resist. Much of Sally Haslanger’s work shares this goal, and her newest article, “Cognition as a Social Skill,” is no exception. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  13
    On the Possibilities of Political Action in-the-World.Erin Carlisle - 2017 - Social Imaginaries 3 (1):83-117.
    This paper clears a path toward an understanding of political action in-the-world. It does so by reconstructing Hannah Arendt, Cornelius Castoriadis, and Peter Wagner’s respective political social theories with a view to the hermeneutic-phenomenological problematic of the world. The analysis begins from the recognition of the human condition as always-already situated in-the-world: both within meaningful and shared world contexts, and within an overarching yet underdetermined world horizon. Two inherently interconnected notions of political action emerge from the reconstruction. The first, as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. The Constitutive Claim: Payoffs and Perils.Erin Beeghly - 2022 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 11 (2):52-60.
    In “Stereotyping as Discrimination: Why Thoughts Can Be Discriminatory,” I propose that stereotyping someone—even if you manage to keep your thoughts hidden and don’t act on them—can constitute a form of discrimination (2021b). What, Alex Madva asks, are the practical implications of this claim? Even if I am correct that stereotyping constitutes a form of discriminatory treatment, it’s still possible that people should keep on speaking and acting as if “discrimination” refers exclusively to behaviors and policies. He invites me to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  35
    Athletic skill and the value of close contests.Erin Flynn - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):186-201.
    In this paper I defend an Irreconcilability Thesis, claiming that two commonly held views about athletic contests are in fact incompatible. The first view is that athletic contests are essentially...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  55
    Productive Excess: Aesthetic Ideas, Silence, and Community.Erin Bradfield - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 48 (2):1-15.
    Due to the complexity of aesthetic ideas and the lack of a determinate concept that is adequate to the experience, we search for the words to describe our encounters with art. Sometimes, that search is in vain, and we have difficulty expressing ourselves. In such cases, we are so taken aback by the sheer amount of cognitive activity spurred by our aesthetic experience that we are silenced by art. Instead of viewing what happens in judgments of taste as “discursively mute,” (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  25
    Negotiating “The Social” and Managing Tuberculosis in Georgia.Erin Koch - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (1):47-55.
    In this paper I utilize anthropological insights to illuminate how health professionals and patients navigate and negotiate what for them is social about tuberculosis in order to improve treatment outcomes and support patients as human beings. I draw on ethnographic research about the implementation of the DOTS approach in Georgia’s National Tuberculosis Program in the wake of the Soviet healthcare system. Georgia is a particularly unique context for exploring these issues given the country’s rich history of medical professionalism and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  15
    Always More than One: The Collectivity of a Life.Erin Manning - 2010 - Body and Society 16 (1):117-127.
    This article explores the idea that affect is collective. By emphasizing that affect does not rest in the individual, a theory of affect is foregrounded that is in conversation with Gilbert Simondon’s concept of individuation, and, more specifically, the concept of the preindividual. The preindividual, in Simondon, is aligned with what Gilles Deleuze calls ‘a life’ — the force of living beyond life itself. This force of life, I suggest, is the resonant field of life’s outside, the more-than of human (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  50.  8
    Taming Wickedness: Towards an Implementation Framework for Medical Ethics.Erin Taylor - 2022 - Health Care Analysis 30 (3):197-214.
    “Wicked” problems are characterized by intractable complexity, uncertainty, and conflict between individuals or institutions, and they inhabit almost every corner of medical ethics. Despite wide acceptance of the same ethical principles, we nevertheless disagree about how to formulate such problems, how to solve them, what would _count_ as solving them, or even what the possible solutions _are_. That is, we don’t always know how best to implement ethical ideals in messy real-world contexts. I sketch an implementation framework for medical ethics (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 986