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  1. Mùa xuân 2024, cây dâu sai trĩu quả.V. Q. Hoàng - 2024 - Thiên Nhiên Quanh Ta.
    Hình ảnh: Quả cây dâu ta, non màu trắng, lớn hồng nhạt, rồi đậm dần. Tới lúc đỏ tươi là sắp chín. Khi chín, quả tím sẫm, thậm chí đen.
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  2. Understanding as Transformative Activity: Radicalizing Neo-Cognitivism for Literary Narratives.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran - 2024 - Philosophia 52 (1):29-36.
    Mikkonen’s new book and his emphasis on understanding should be regarded as an important contribution to the contemporary debate on the cognitive value of literary narratives. As I shall argue, his notion of understanding can also help explain how literature is existentially valuable. In so doing, his account can support a radicalized contemporary neo-cognitivism according to which literature can affect us existentially and lead to a personal transformation.
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  3. Apt Perception, Aesthetic Engagement, and Curatorial Practices.Emine Hande Tuna & Octavian Ion - forthcoming - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):38-53.
    This paper applies the account developed by Susanna Siegel in The Rationality of Perception to aesthetic cases and explores the implications of such an account for aesthetic engagement as well as curatorial and exhibitionary practices. It argues that one’s prior outlook – expertise, beliefs, desires, fears, preferences, attitudes – can have both aesthetically good and bad influences on perceptual experiences, just as it can have both epistemically good and bad influences. Analysing these bad influences in cases of ‘hijacked’ aesthetic perception (...)
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  4. That Which Guilds the Lily: Moving from Aesthetic Value to an Ethical Aesthetic.Leslie Herrmann - 2024 - In Mara Del Baldo, Maria-Gabriella Baldarelli & Elisabetta Righini (eds.), Place Based Approaches to Sustainability Volume I: Ethical and Spiritual Foundations of Sustainability. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 111-131.
    For many members of contemporary western societies, the environment is either the theatre upon which we plan and play out our own aspirations, or a basket of resources from which to extract, produce and commercialize consumable ‘goods.’ Infrequently noticed, thought about, or cared for in any substantive way, it is merely the theatre upon which we plan and play out our own aspirations. The same might be said of many ‘sustainability enterprises,’ as the environment is taken, quite literally, as a (...)
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  5. Aesthetic Value of Immoral Fictions.Elisa Paganini - 2024 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 24 (70):53-63.
    Can one have an aesthetically valuable experience of fiction that takes an immoral perspective? Some have argued that one can. However, some important objections have been raised against this idea. Two objections are: that the immorality involved is confined to fictional reality, and that the aesthetic value of immoral fiction is dictated by a pluralistic attitude that not everyone accepts. My aim is to respond to these challenges and to argue, on the basis of two examples, that even an unlimited (...)
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  6. The Aesthetic Value of the World.Shannon Brick - 2023 - British Journal of Aesthetics 64 (1):139-142.
    In The Aesthetic Value of the World, Tom Cochrane sets out to defend Aestheticism—the view that aesthetic value, and only aesthetic value, makes the world worth.
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  7. True Beauty.Ryan P. Doran - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics.
    What is the nature of the concept BEAUTY? Does it differ fundamentally from nearby concepts such as PRETTINESS? It is argued that BEAUTY, but not PRETTINESS, is a dual-character concept. Across a number of contexts, it is proposed that BEAUTY has a descriptive sense that is characterised by, inter alia, having intrinsically pleasing appearances; and a normative sense associated with deeply-held values. This account is supported across two, pre-registered, studies (N=500), and by drawing on analysis of corpus data. It is (...)
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  8. Empathic Imaginings and Knowledge of What It Is Like in Aesthetic Cognitivism.Íngrid Vendrell Ferran - forthcoming - In Empathy and the Aesthetic Mind. Bloomsbury.
  9. Truly, Madly, Deeply: Moral Beauty & the Self.Ryan P. Doran - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    When are morally good actions beautiful, when indeed they are? In this paper, it is argued that morally good actions are beautiful when they appear to express the deep or true self, and in turn tend to give rise to an emotion which is characterised by feelings of being moved, unity, inspiration, and meaningfulness, inter alia. In advancing the case for this claim, it is revealed that there are additional sources of well-formedness in play in the context of moral beauty (...)
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  10. Kant's Fantasy.Francey Russell - 2024 - Mind.
    Throughout his lectures and published writings on anthropology, Kant describes a form of unintentional, unstructured, obscure, and pleasurable imaginative mental activity, which he calls fantasy (Phantasie), where we ‘take pleasure in letting our mind wander about in obscurity.’ In the context of his pragmatic anthropology, Kant was concerned not only to describe this form of mental activity as a fact of human psychology, but more importantly, to criticize and discourage it. But must we share Kant’s negative evaluation? Could fantasy play (...)
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  11. Motivational Internalism & Disinterestedness.Ryan P. Doran - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics.
    According to the most important objection to the existence of moral beauty, true judgements of moral beauty are not possible as moral judgements require being motivated to act in line with the moral judgement made, and judgements of beauty require not being motivated to act in any way. Here, I clarify the argument underlying the objection, and show that it does not show that moral beauty does not exist. I present two responses: namely, that the beauty of moral beauty does (...)
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  12. Tanrı, Estetik ve Estetik Kanıt/God, Aesthetic and Aesthetic Proof.Büşra Nur Tutuk - 2023 - Dissertation, Ankara University
    The subject of the thesis is the relationship between aesthetic and God. It aims to discuss whether the sense of beauty is proof of the existence of God and to determine the plausibility of aesthetic proof. As a matter of fact that reality and the perception of beauty point to two-way consciousness. In this context, it will be inevitable to mention God's relation with consciousness in the emergence of beauty. In the first part, the concepts of aesthetics will be analyzed, (...)
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  13. Art, Affectivity, and Aesthetic Value: Geiger on the Role of Emotions in Aesthetic Appreciation.Íngrid Vendrell Ferran - 2023 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 10 (2):143 - 159.
    This paper explores Moritz Geiger’s work on the role of emotions in aesthetic appreciation and shows its potential for contemporary research. Drawing on the main tenets of Geiger’s phenomenological aesthetics as an aesthetics of value, the paper begins by elaborating his model of aesthetic appreciation. I argue that, placed in the contemporary debate, his model is close to affective models which make affective states responsible for the apprehension of the aesthetic value of an artwork, though Geiger also makes important concessions (...)
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  14. Autonomy and Aesthetic Valuing.Nick Riggle - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (I).
    Accounts of aesthetic valuing emphasize two constraints on the formation of aesthetic belief. We must form our own aesthetic beliefs by engaging with aesthetic value first-hand (the acquaintance principle) and by using our own capacities (the autonomy principle). But why? C. Thi Nguyen’s proposal is that aesthetic valuing has an inverted structure. We often care about inquiry and engagement for the sake of having true beliefs, but in aesthetic engagement this is flipped: we care about arriving at good aesthetic beliefs (...)
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  15. Value Capture.C. Thi Nguyen - forthcoming - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    Value capture occurs when an agent’s values are rich and subtle; they enter a social environment that presents simplified — typically quantified — versions of those values; and those simplified articulations come to dominate their practical reasoning. Examples include becoming motivated by FitBit’s step counts, Twitter Likes and Re-tweets, citation rates, ranked lists of best schools, and Grade Point Averages. We are vulnerable to value capture because of the competitive advantage that such crisp and clear expressions of value have in (...)
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  16. Over-Appreciating Appreciation.Rebecca Wallbank & Jon Robson - 2022 - In Jeremy Wyatt, Julia Zakkou & Dan Zeman (eds.), Perspectives on Taste. New York: Routledge. pp. 40-57.
    Aestheticians have had a great deal to say recently in praise of (aesthetic) appreciation. This enthusiastic appreciation for appreciation may seem unsurprising given the important role it plays in many of our aesthetic practices, but we maintain that some prominent aestheticians have overstated the role of appreciation (and, perhaps more importantly, understated the role of other elements we will discuss) when it comes to the exercise of aesthetic taste. This is not, of course, to deny the obvious fact that appreciation (...)
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  17. The comparative achievement explanation of artistic value.Ian D. Dunkle - 2023 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 61 (3):457-473.
    There is broad agreement in aesthetics that some artworks are greater than others despite bearing equivalent (or lesser) aesthetic value. One explanation of this difference in artistic value is that creation of the greater artwork represents a greater achievement. The aim of this article is to refine this explanation and to defend it against recent criticisms. First, I present a prima facie case in favor of the achievement explanation. Second, I draw on the history of photography to motivate three objections (...)
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  18. Turning queries into questions: For a plurality of perspectives in the age of AI and other frameworks with limited (mind)sets.Claudia Westermann & Tanu Gupta - 2023 - Technoetic Arts 21 (1):3-13.
    The editorial introduces issue 21.1 of Technoetic Arts via a critical reflection on the artificial intelligence hype (AI hype) that emerged in 2022. Tracing the history of the critique of Large Language Models, the editorial underscores that the recent calls for slowing down the development of AI, as promoted by the technology industry, do not signify a shift towards reason and considerate economics. Instead, as these calls are firmly embedded in narratives where the power to decide for the majority of (...)
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  19. Tom Cochrane, "The Aesthetic Value of the World.". [REVIEW]Jennifer Welchman - 2023 - Philosophy in Review 43 (3):11-13.
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  20. Msza h-moll BWV 232 Jana Sebastiana Bacha w świetle estetyki teologicznej Hansa Ursa von Balthasara.Andrzej Krawiec - 2021 - Liturgia Sacra. Liturgia - Musica - Ars 57 (1):167-194.
    In the first part of his magnum opus Hans Urs von Balthasarpresents his project of theological aesthetics where the experience of art becomes an entrance to a religious act and an ennobling way leading to the contemplation of God. Defining the essence of being human as a spiritual being directed towards God bears a deep ethical meaning in this consideration. H.U. von Balthasar’s reflection over the religious dimension of the essence of art is shaped within theology but at the same (...)
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  21. Attention and Aesthetic Value.Morten Kyndrup - 2023 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 32 (65-66).
    We are capable of engaging in different kinds of relations with objects and situations we meet. Any relation is, in principle singular and thus einmalig, unique. Still, certain general types of relationality do exist. Relations may be established with focus (“attention”) on usability, truth, ethics, power, authenticity—and of course, on “beauty,” on aesthetic value. This differentiation is an invention of the Modern world and in itself subject to historical change. In terms of “discursive areas” it has been theorized in varying (...)
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  22. Value, Virtue, and Vivienne Westwood: On the Philosophical Importance of Fashion.Colette Olive - 2023 - Open Philosophy 6 (1):481-95.
    The late Vivienne Westwood sketched a role for fashion that elevates it from the prosaic to the status of art, as something important, life-enhancing, and worthy of pursuit. Here, a philosophical treatment of Westwood’s vision of fashion that does justice to the artistic and life-enhancing value that fashion can realise is offered, using an emergent theory in contemporary analytic aesthetics. The virtue theory of art delineates the intrinsic worth of art in terms of the opportunities it provides for us to (...)
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  23. The aesthetic value of scientific experiments.Milena Ivanova - 2023 - In Milena Ivanova & Alice Murphy (eds.), The Aesthetics of Scientific Experiments. New York, NY: Routledge.
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  24. Artistic Exceptionalism and the Risks of Activist Art.Christopher Earley - 2023 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 81 (2):141-152.
    Activist artists often face a difficult question: is striving to change the world undermined when pursued through difficult and experimental artistic means? Looking closely at Adrian Piper's 'Four Intruders plus Alarm Systems' (1980), I will consider why this is an important concern for activist art, and assess three different responses in relation to Piper’s work. What I call the conciliatory stance recommends that when activist artists encounter misunderstanding, they should downplay their experimental artistry in favor of fitting their work to (...)
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  25. Aesthetic Judgments, Evaluative Content, and (Hybrid) Expressivism.Jochen Briesen - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    Aesthetic statements of the form ‘X is beautiful’ are evaluative; they indicate the speaker’s positive affective attitude regarding X. Why is this so? Is the evaluative content part of the truth conditions, or is it a pragmatic phenomenon (i.e. presupposition, implicature)? First, I argue that semantic approaches as well as these pragmatic ones cannot satisfactorily explain the evaluativity of aesthetic statements. Second, I offer a positive proposal based on a speech-act theoretical version of hybrid expressivism, which states that, with the (...)
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  26. The Aesthetics of Crossword Puzzles.Robbie Kubala - 2023 - British Journal of Aesthetics 63 (3):381-394.
    This paper develops an aesthetics of crossword puzzles. I present a taxonomy of crosswords in the Anglophone world and argue that there are three distinct sources of aesthetic value in crosswords. First, and in common with other puzzles, crosswords merit aesthetic experiences of our own agency: paradigmatically, the aesthetic experience of struggling for and hitting upon the right solution. In addition to instantiating the aesthetic value of puzzles in general, crosswords in particular can have two other sources of aesthetic value: (...)
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  27. Olympia's Maid: Reclaiming Black Female Subjectivity.Lorraine O'Grady - 1994 - In Joanna Frueh, Cassandra L. Langer & Arlene Raven (eds.), New Feminist Criticism: Art, Identity, Action. Icon.
    This first-ever article of cultural criticism on the black female body was to prove germinal and continues to be widely referenced in scholarly and other works. Occasionally, controversial, it has been frequently anthologized, most recently in Amelia Jones, ed., The Feminism and Visual Cultural Reader, 2nd edition (Routledge, 2010). The first part of this article--delivered in a panel of the College Art Association early in 1992--was published in Afterimage 20:1 (Summer 1992). The revised version, including "Postscript," originally appeared in the (...)
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  28. Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet and Matisse to Today.Denise Murrell - 2018 - Yale University Press.
    This revelatory study investigates how changing modes of representing the black female figure were foundational to the development of modern art. Posing Modernity examines the legacy of Edouard Manet's Olympia (1863), arguing that this radical painting marked a fitfully evolving shift toward modernist portrayals of the black figure as an active participant in everyday life rather than as an exotic "other." Denise Murrell explores the little-known interfaces between the avant-gardists of nineteenth-century Paris and the post-abolition community of free black Parisians. (...)
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  29. Enhancing Artistic Presence through Contemplative Contextual Criticism.Peg Brand Weiser - 2006 - In Julien Robson (ed.), Presence. The Speed Art Museum. pp. 180-193.
    "Presence" is a word that can function both as a descriptor of the uniqueness, identity, and strength of an(y) identifiable, individual work of art (as used in the phrase, its "artistic presence") and, more specifically, and with a capital P, the name of a year-long exhibit consisting of a series of artworks in a uniquely created architectural environment with the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky. In addition, as well-known art theorist Donald Preziosi points out in his 2004 essay ["Art (...)
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  30. Gendered Bodies in Contemporary Chinese Art.Mary Bittner Wiseman - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 385-405.
    The idea of beauty in the West has often been connected with the idea of woman, whose beauty has been celebrated in sculptures of the nude since classical Greece and in paintings since the sixteenth century. the nude is not a genre in either traditional or contemporary Chinese art, however, and although there has been nakedness in the representations of the body in the contemporary art of China, its presence is marked by two characteristics that distance the Chinese naked body (...)
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  31. Beauty and the State: Female Bodies as State Apparatus and Recent Beauty Discourses in China.Eva Kit Wah Man - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 368-384.
    The global economy has an impact on female beauty today, regardless of the multicultural and historical factors in its formation and construction, resulting in monolithic crazes in women's fashion and appearance. but female beauty in china has been greatly contested with China's turbulent modern history, and this contestation deserves serious consideration, together with the politics by which the Chinese state apparatus has promoted and regulated female beauty. I argue that certain factors have been constant in contemporary discourses of female beauty. (...)
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  32. Orientalism Inside/Out: The Art of Soody Sharifi.Cynthia Freeland - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 347-367.
    "Orientalism" is a term made prominent by critic Edward Said in his 1978 book of that title. . . . Said specifically used the term to designate a field of self-constituted experts who proposed to explain the Orient to the West. . . . This essay explores the visual artwork of Soody Sharifi who left Iran before the Islamic Revolution of 1979, but returns to photograph women and girls. After a trip back to Iran in 1999, she began a self-portrait (...)
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  33. Feminist Art, Content, and Beauty.Keith Lehrer - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 297-305.
    Art reconfigures experience. Art is a mentalized physical object. Danto remarks that art is embodied meaning. Hein says that feminist art chats on the edge. Our mental life is filled with meaning, but art opens the question of the meaning of experience. . . . Art, chatting on the edge of experience, nevertheless invites us to choose our stance in that world. I suggest that that is the beauty, or, at least the value, of art. The art experience presents us (...)
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  34. Seductive Shift: A Review of The Most Beautiful Woman in Gucha.Valerie Fuchs - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 293-296.
    Breda Beban's stunning two-screen video installation, The Most Beautiful Woman in Gucha, documents a mutually seductive encounter between a beautiful belly dancer and an inebriated young man at a Romany brass band festival in Serbia. . . . With The Most Beautiful Woman in Gucha, you can have your cake and eat it too, because this cake has a whole-grain antioxidant, omega-3 excellence running through it.
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  35. Bollywood and the Feminine: Hinduism and Images of Womanhood.Jane Duran - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 280-292.
  36. Beauty, Youth, and the Balinese Legong Dance.Stephen Davies - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 259-279.
    In this chapterI discuss beauty and youth in Balinese dance, with special reference to Legong. Legong is the "classic" Balinese dance genre for females and is represented by Balinese to the world as the quintessence of grace, charm, and beauty in their performing arts. . . . Apparently, the notion of beauty that is invoked here is not straightforwardly equivalent to the heterosexual male norms for female sexual attractiveness, which may favor younger women but don't require them to be under (...)
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  37. Beauty between Disability and Gender: Frida Kahlo in Paper Dolls.Fedwa Malti-Douglas - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 243-255.
    Beauty, disability, and gender crossing: The first two, though provocative, are not an altogether unexpected pair. Disability can be an object of beauty, as Anita Silvers has shown, just as it can be fetishized. Yet one more often thinks of beauty and disability as opposites. But what is gender crossing doing in this mix? Sometimes, apparently, when beauty is conjugated with disability in an atmosphere of glamour and celebrity, games with gender result. this is certainly the case with the representation (...)
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  38. Indigenous Beauty.Phoebe M. Farris - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 162-174.
    When I was asked to write an essay about beauty from a gendered or ethnic perspective, two Native American expressions came to my mind and served as inspiration: "Beauty surrounds us' and "Walk in beauty." "Walk in beauty" is a well-known Navajo saying and philosophical outlook. It encompasses both inner beauty and carrying oneself in a dignified manner the brings harmony to one's environment. The phrase is applicable to both women and men. The phrase "Beauty surrounds us" is also well (...)
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  39. Worldwide Women.Eleanor Heartney - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 126-134.
    In a season rife with related events [i.e., 2007], the Brooklyn Museum's "Global Feminisms: New Directions in Contemporary Art" is an eagerly anticipated component of a nationwide reevaluation of feminist art. It takes its place alongside the presentation of "WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution" at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and the installation of Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party (1974-79) and opening of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum, for which (...)
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  40. Foreword to Beauty Unlimited.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press.
    Whatever approach one favors, the relationships between the most abstract and disembodied sense of beauty and the physical, erotic sense are clearly harder to sever than many philosophers have previously realized. The soul may be glad to forget its connection with the body, as Santayana put it, but that gladness indicates that the connection is there to be forgotten in the first place. And often it is not so much forgotten as reshaped and transfigured. Such transformations are explored here with (...)
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  41. On the Ethics of Imagination and Ethical-Aesthetic Value Interaction in Fiction.Adriana Clavel-Vázquez - 2022 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 9.
    Advocates of interactionism in the ethical criticism of art argue that ethical value impacts aesthetic value. The debate is concerned with “the intrinsic question”: the question of whether ethical flaws/merits in artworks’ manifested attitudes affect their aesthetic value (Gaut 2007: 9). This paper argues that the assumption that artworks have intrinsic ethical value is problematic at least in regards to a significant subset of works: fictional artworks. I argue that, insofar as their ethical value emerges only from attitudes attributable to (...)
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  42. "A New Kind of Beauty": From Classicism to Karole Armitage's Early Ballets.Sally Banes - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 266-288.
    For the generation of feminists who emerged in the 1960s and 1970s, female beauty was suspect, for it simply pandered to male desire. And for the modernist artists of that period, beauty in art had long since been banished. but for Armitage's generation, already empowered by the political gains of feminism on the one hand, and engaged in a postmodernist challenge to the values of artistic modernism on the other, beauty in art and in the female body could once again (...)
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  43. A Man Pretending to be a Woman: On Yasumasa Morimura's "Actresses".Kaori Chino - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 252-265. Translated by Reiko Romii.
    The "Actresses" series by Yasumasa Morimura brutally exposes the position, attitude, or stance we assume when we see this body of work. The viewer's one-sided gaze, inflicted upon the women Morimura has impersonated, is repelled and hurled back to the viewer as the point questions: "Who are you?" and "What is your position?" You yourself, not an abstract human being, are being interrogated here. It is easy to speak lofty ideas while casting ourselves as objective transparent beings: disappearing borders, the (...)
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  44. Whose Beauty? Women, Art, and Intersubjectivity in Luce Irigaray's Writings.Hilary Robinson - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 224-251.
    This essay explores the implications of Irigaray's discussion of the concept "beauty" . . . Her writings indicate moments of strategic or structural possibility from which women can create beauties appropriate to their subjectivities, and outline how becoming subjects, women, and mediating the resultant subjectivity is in itself to create beauty. Although in Western culture the Symbolic has a phallocentric syntax and what is read as beauty of body and beauty in art are products of phallocentric structures, nonetheless moments of (...)
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  45. Miss America: Whose Ideal?Dawn Perlmutter - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 155-168.
    Although it may appear that the Miss America Pageant is responsible for breaking down class barriers, the fact is that the pageant was always governed by upper-class patriarchal values of what constitutes the proper woman. . . . [it] fosters sexist practices, and exploits, commodities, and objectifies women and girls; consider the case of the murdered JonBenet Ramsey--who competed in children's beauty pageants at age six. If there is still any question in your mind about how deeply ingrained Miss American (...)
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  46. Beauty (Re)Discovers the Male Body.Susan Bordo - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 112-154.
    Putting classical art to the side for the moment, the naked and near-naked female body became an object of mainstream consumption first in Playboy and its imitators, then in movies, and only then in fashion photographs. With the male body, the trajectory has been different. Fashion has taken the lead, the movies have followed. Hollywood may have been a chest-fest in the fifties, but it was male clothing designers [e.g., Calvin Klein] who went south and violated the really powerful taboos--not (...)
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  47. Beauty and Its Kitsch Competitors.Kathleen M. Higgins - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 87-111.
    One of the reasons for the disappearance of beauty in the artistic ideology of the late twentieth century has been the seeming similarity of beauty to certain kinds of kitsch. Beauty has also been associated with flawlessness and with glamour. I will content that the flawless and the glamorous are actually categories of kitsch, and that the dominance of these images in marketing has contributed to our societal tendency to confuse them with beauty. The quests for flawlessness and glamour are (...)
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  48. Beauty and Beautification.Arthur C. Danto - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 65-83.
    Hegel has identified what I have preemptively designated a third aesthetic realm--in addition to natural beauty and artistic beauty--one greatly connected with human life . . . art applied to the enhancement of life . . . But the other border of what I shall designate the Third Realm is equally non-exclusionary, especially when we consider what Hegel singles out under the head of beautiful people--the kind of beauty possessed by Helen of Troy, say, which we must suppose a wonder (...)
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  49. Malcolm's Conk and Danto's Colors; or, Four Logical Petitions Concerning race, Beauty, and Aesthetics.Paul C. Taylor - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 57-64.
    In this essay I want to consider how Penola's (character in Toni Morrison's novel, The Bluest Eye) circumstance es motivate her petition--"asking for beauty"--and two others, after which I will offer my own petition concerning the practice of aesthetics.
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  50. Ethnicity, Race, and Monstrosity: The Rhetorics of Horror and Humor.Noel Carroll - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 37-56.
    In this essay, I am concerned with the representation of groups in popular culture. My interest has to do with the politics of representing people. The couplet beauty/nonbeauty (or, more specifically, beauty/ugliness) frequently figures importantly in the representation of groups, including most notably, for my purposes, ethnic and racial minorities. This couplet can be politically significant because beauty is often associated in our culture with moral goodness. . . . Thus, beauty and non beauty can serve as a basis for (...)
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