Results for 'Vaccination'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Vaccinating for Whom? Distinguishing Between Self-Protective, Paternalistic, Altruistic and Indirect Vaccination.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (2):190-200.
    Preventive vaccination can protect not just vaccinated individuals, but also others, which is often a central point in discussions about vaccination. To date, there has been no systematic study of self- and other-directed motives behind vaccination. This article has two major goals: first, to examine and distinguish between self- and other-directed motives behind vaccination, especially with regard to vaccinating for the sake of third parties, and second, to explore some ways in which this approach can help (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2. Mandatory Vaccination: An Unqualified Defence.Roland Pierik - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (2):381-398.
    The 2015 Disneyland outbreak of measles in the US unequivocally brought to light what had been brewing below the surface for a while: a slow but steady decline in vaccination rates resulting in a rising number of outbreaks. This can be traced back to an increasing public questioning of vaccines by an emerging anti-vaccination movement. This article argues that, in the face of diminishing vaccination rates, childhood vaccinations should not be seen as part of the domain of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  3.  41
    Influenza Vaccination Strategies Should Target Children.Ben Bambery, Thomas Douglas, Michael J. Selgelid, Hannah Maslen, Alberto Giubilini, Andrew J. Pollard & Julian Savulescu - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (2):221-234.
    Strategies to increase influenza vaccination rates have typically targeted healthcare professionals and individuals in various high-risk groups such as the elderly. We argue that they should focus on increasing vaccination rates in children. Because children suffer higher influenza incidence rates than any other demographic group, and are major drivers of seasonal influenza epidemics, we argue that influenza vaccination strategies that serve to increase uptake rates in children are likely to be more effective in reducing influenza-related morbidity and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4.  74
    Vaccine Rationing and the Urgency of Social Justice in the Covid‐19 Response.Harald Schmidt - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):46-49.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5. Vaccine Mandates, Value Pluralism, and Policy Diversity.Mark C. Navin & Katie Attwell - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (9):1042-1049.
    Political communities across the world have recently sought to tackle rising rates of vaccine hesitancy and refusal, by implementing coercive immunization programs, or by making existing immunization programs more coercive. Many academics and advocates of public health have applauded these policy developments, and they have invoked ethical reasons for implementing or strengthening vaccine mandates. Others have criticized these policies on ethical grounds, for undermining liberty, and as symptoms of broader government overreach. But such arguments often obscure or abstract away from (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6.  34
    Against Vaccine Nationalism.Nicole Hassoun - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (11):773-774.
    While rich countries like the USA and UK are starting to vaccinate their populations against COVID-19, poor countries may lack access to a vaccine for years. A global effort to provide vaccines through the COVAX facility Accelerator) aims to distribute 2 billion vaccinations by the end of next year, but the USA has refused to join and even those rich countries that have joined are entering into bilateral deals with pharmaceutical companies to buy up the supply. Canada, for instance, has (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  63
    Vaccine Ethics: An Ethical Framework for Global Distribution of COVID-19 Vaccines.Nancy S. Jecker, Aaron G. Wightman & Douglas S. Diekema - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (5):308-317.
    This paper addresses the just distribution of vaccines against the SARS-CoV-2 virus and sets forth an ethical framework that prioritises frontline and essential workers, people at high risk of severe disease or death, and people at high risk of infection. Section I makes the case that vaccine distribution should occur at a global level in order to accelerate development and fair, efficient vaccine allocation. Section II puts forth ethical values to guide vaccine distribution including helping people with the greatest need, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  8. Vaccination, Risks, and Freedom: The Seat Belt Analogy.Alberto Giubilini & Julian Savulescu - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics:phz014.
    We argue that, from the point of view public health ethics, vaccination is significantly analogous to seat belt use in motor vehicles and that coercive vaccination policies are ethically justified for the same reasons why coercive seat belt laws are ethically justified. We start by taking seriously the small risk of vaccines’ side effects and the fact that such risks might need to be coercively imposed on individuals. If millions of individuals are vaccinated, even a very small risk (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  9.  43
    Misunderstanding Vaccine Hesitancy : A Case Study in Epistemic Injustice.Quassim Cassam - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory.
    This paper argues that vice-charging, the practice of charging other persons with epistemic vice, can itself be epistemically vicious. It identifies some potential vices of vice-charging and identifies knowledge of other people as a type of knowledge that is obstructed by epistemically vicious attributions of epistemic vice. The hazards of vice-charging are illustrated by reference to the accusation that parents who hesitate to give their children the MMR triple vaccine are guilty of gullibility and dogmatism. Ethnographic and sociological research is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. VO: Vaccine Ontology.Yongqun He, Lindsay Cowell, Alexander D. Diehl, H. L. Mobley, Bjoern Peters, Alan Ruttenberg, Richard H. Scheuermann, Ryan R. Brinkman, Melanie Courtot, Chris Mungall, Barry Smith & Others - 2009 - In ICBO 2009: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Biomedical Ontology. Buffalo:
    Vaccine research, as well as the development, testing, clinical trials, and commercial uses of vaccines involve complex processes with various biological data that include gene and protein expression, analysis of molecular and cellular interactions, study of tissue and whole body responses, and extensive epidemiological modeling. Although many data resources are available to meet different aspects of vaccine needs, it remains a challenge how we are to standardize vaccine annotation, integrate data about varied vaccine types and resources, and support advanced vaccine (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. Ethics of Vaccine Refusal.Michael Kowalik - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics (48):240-243.
    Proponents of vaccine mandates typically claim that everyone who can be vaccinated has a moral or ethical obligation to do so for the sake of those who cannot be vaccinated, or in the interest of public health. I evaluate several previously undertheorised premises implicit to the ‘obligation to vaccinate’ type of arguments and show that the general conclusion is false: there is neither a moral obligation to vaccinate nor a sound ethical basis to mandate vaccination under any circumstances, even (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Vaccine Refusal and Trust: The Trouble With Coercion and Education and Suggestions for a Cure.Johan Christiaan Bester - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):555-559.
    There can be little doubt about the ethical imperative to ensure adequate vaccination uptake against certain infectious diseases. In the face of vaccine refusal, health authorities and providers instinctively appeal to coercive approaches or increased education as methods to ensure adequate vaccine uptake. Recently, some have argued that public fear around Ebola should be used as an opportunity for such approaches, should an Ebola vaccine become available. In this article, the author describes the difficulties associated with coercion and education (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13. A Defense of Compulsory Vaccination.Jessica Flanigan - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (1):5-25.
    Vaccine refusal harms and risks harming innocent bystanders. People are not entitled to harm innocents or to impose deadly risks on others, so in these cases there is nothing to be said for the right to refuse vaccination. Compulsory vaccination is therefore justified because non-vaccination can rightly be prohibited, just as other kinds of harmful and risky conduct are rightly prohibited. I develop an analogy to random gunfire to illustrate this point. Vaccine refusal, I argue, is morally (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  14.  98
    Good Reasons to Vaccinate: Mandatory or Payment for Risk?Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (2):78-85.
    Mandatory vaccination, including for COVID-19, can be ethically justified if the threat to public health is grave, the confidence in safety and effectiveness is high, the expected utility of mandatory vaccination is greater than the alternatives, and the penalties or costs for non-compliance are proportionate. I describe an algorithm for justified mandatory vaccination. Penalties or costs could include withholding of benefits, imposition of fines, provision of community service or loss of freedoms. I argue that under conditions of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  15.  20
    Vaccine Passports and Health Disparities: A Perilous Journey.Nancy S. Jecker - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107491.
    This paper raises health equity concerns about the use of passports for domestic and international travel to certify COVID-19 vaccination. Part I argues that for international travel, health equity objections undercut arguments defending vaccine passports, which are based on tholding people responsible, protecting global health, safeguarding individual liberty and continuing current practice. Part II entertains a proposal for a scaled down vaccine passport for domestic use in countries where vaccines are widely and equitably available. It raises health equity concerns (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16.  20
    Ebola Vaccine Development Plan: Ethics, Concerns and Proposed Measures.Morenike Oluwatoyin Folayan, Aminu Yakubu, Bridget Haire & Kristin Peterson - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundThe global interest in developing therapies for Ebola infection management and its prevention is laudable. However the plan to conduct an emergency immunization program specifically for healthcare workers using experimental vaccines raises some ethical concerns. This paper shares perspectives on these concerns and suggests how some of them may best be addressed.DiscussionThe recruitment of healthcare workers for Ebola vaccine research has challenges. It could result in coercion of initially dissenting healthcare workers to assist in the management of EVD infected persons (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17. Mandating Vaccination.Anthony Skelton & Lisa Forsberg - 2020 - In Meredith Celene Schwartz (ed.), The Ethics of Pandemics. pp. 131-134.
    A short piece exploring some arguments for mandating vaccination for Covid-19.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Conscientious Objection to Vaccination.Steve Clarke, Alberto Giubilini & Mary Jean Walker - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (3):155-161.
    Vaccine refusal occurs for a variety of reasons. In this article we examine vaccine refusals that are made on conscientious grounds; that is, for religious, moral, or philosophical reasons. We focus on two questions: first, whether people should be entitled to conscientiously object to vaccination against contagious diseases ; second, if so, to what constraints or requirements should conscientious objection to vaccination be subject. To address these questions, we consider an analogy between CO to vaccination and CO (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  19.  49
    The Ethics of Vaccination.Alberto Giubilini - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This open access book discusses individual, collective, and institutional responsibilities with regard to vaccination from the perspective of philosophy and public health ethics. It addresses the issue of what it means for a collective to be morally responsible for the realisation of herd immunity and what the implications of collective responsibility are for individual and institutional responsibilities. The first chapter introduces some key concepts in the vaccination debate, such as ‘herd immunity’, ‘public goods’, and ‘vaccine refusal’; and explains (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  20.  13
    Vaccination Mandates, Physically Forced Vaccination, and Rationing in the Intensive Care Unit: Searching for Ethical Coherence in the COVID-19 Pandemic.Afschin Gandjour - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-4.
    Vaccine mandates are coercive because they impose penalties, such as fines, criminal sanctions, or job loss. However, they are not as coercive as physical force. Mandates c...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Values and Vaccine Refusal: Hard Questions in Ethics, Epistemology, and Health Care.Mark Navin - 2015 - Routledge.
    Parents in the US and other societies are increasingly refusing to vaccinate their children, even though popular anti-vaccine myths – e.g. ‘vaccines cause autism’ – have been debunked. This book explains the epistemic and moral failures that lead some parents to refuse to vaccinate their children. First, some parents have good reasons not to defer to the expertise of physicians, and to rely instead upon their own judgments about how to care for their children. Unfortunately, epistemic self-reliance systematically distorts beliefs (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  22.  91
    Against COVID‐19 Vaccination of Healthy Children.Steven R. Kraaijeveld, Rachel Gur-Arie & Euzebiusz Jamrozik - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (6):687-698.
  23.  34
    Vaccine Rejecting Parents’ Engagement With Expert Systems That Inform Vaccination Programs.Katie Attwell, Julie Leask, Samantha B. Meyer, Philippa Rokkas & Paul Ward - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):65-76.
    In attempting to provide protection to individuals and communities, childhood immunization has benefits that far outweigh disease risks. However, some parents decide not to immunize their children with some or all vaccines for reasons including lack of trust in governments, health professionals, and vaccine manufacturers. This article employs a theoretical analysis of trust and distrust to explore how twenty-seven parents with a history of vaccine rejection in two Australian cities view the expert systems central to vaccination policy and practice. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  24.  24
    COVID-19 Vaccination Status Should Not Be Used in Triage Tie-Breaking.Olivia Schuman, Joelle Robertson-Preidler & Trevor M. Bibler - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics:1-3.
    This article discusses the triage response to the COVID-19 delta variant surge of 2021. One issue that distinguishes the delta wave from earlier surges is that by the time it became the predominant strain in the USA in July 2021, safe and effective vaccines against COVID-19 had been available for all US adults for several months. We consider whether healthcare professionals and triage committees would have been justified in prioritising patients with COVID-19 who are vaccinated above those who are unvaccinated (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Mass-Vaccination Programmes and the Value of Respect for Autonomy.Lotte Asveld - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (5):245–257.
    Respect for autonomy is problematic in relation to public health programmes such as vaccination, as the success of such programmes depends on widespread compliance. European countries have different policies for dealing with objectors to vaccination programmes. In some countries compliance is compulsory, while in others objectors are exempted or allowed to enter the programme under specific conditions. In this paper I argue that the objectors should not be treated as a homogenous group as is done in the above-mentioned (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  26.  60
    Listening to Vaccine Refusers.Kaisa Kärki - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):3-9.
    In bioethics vaccine refusal is often discussed as an instance of free riding on the herd immunity of an infectious disease. However, the social science of vaccine refusal suggests that the reasoning behind refusal to vaccinate more often stems from previous negative experiences in healthcare practice as well as deeply felt distrust of healthcare institutions. Moreover, vaccine refusal often acts like an exit mechanism. Whilst free riding is often met with sanctions, exit, according to Albert Hirschman’s theory of exit and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  28
    Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy Requires an Ethically Consistent Health Strategy.Laura Williamson & Hannah Glaab - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):84.
    Vaccine hesitancy is a growing threat to public health. The reasons are complex but linked inextricably to a lack of trust in vaccines, expertise and traditional sources of authority. Efforts to increase immunization uptake in children in many countries that have seen a fall in vaccination rates are two-fold: addressing hesitancy by improving healthcare professional-parent exchange and information provision in the clinic; and, secondly, public health strategies that can override parental concerns and values with coercive measures such as mandatory (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  6
    Ebola Vaccine Trials.Godfrey B. Tangwa, Katharine Browne & Doris Schroeder - 2018 - In Doris Schroeder, Julie Cook, François Hirsch, Solveig Fenet & Vasantha Muthuswamy (eds.), Ethics Dumping: Case Studies From North-South Research Collaborations. Springer. pp. 49-60.
    The Ebola epidemic that broke out inWest Africa West AfricaAfrica towards the end of 2013 had been brought under reasonable control by 2015. The epidemic had severely affected three countries. This case study is about a phase I/II clinical trial Phase I/II clinical trial of a candidate Ebola virus vaccine in 2015 in a sub-Saharan AfricanSub-Saharan Africa country which had not registered any cases of the Ebola virus disease. The study was designed as a randomized double-blinded trialRandomized double blinded trial. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29.  69
    College Vaccination Mandates Do Not Violate Medical Ethics.Nathan Nobis - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Blog.
    As a medical ethicist, I want to explain why college vaccination requirements decidedly do not violate the core principles of medical ethics which include avoiding or lessening harms, promoting benefits, respecting people and their informed and free choices, and promoting justice and fairness. In particular, vaccine requirements do not violate the respect-related requirement to not selfishly “use” and abuse others as “means” for someone else’s benefit. Since false claims on important issues often have dire consequences, it’s important to explain (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  18
    Vaccination Policies: Between Best and Basic Interests of the Child, Between Precaution and Proportionality.Roland Pierik - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (2):201-214.
    How should liberal-democratic governments deal with emerging vaccination hesitancy when that leads to the resurgence of diseases that for decades were under control? This article argues that vaccination policies should be justified in terms of a proper weighing of the rights of children to be protected against vaccine-preventable diseases and the rights of parents to raise their children in ways that they see fit. The argument starts from the concept of the ‘best interests of the child involved’. The (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  39
    Vaccination, Autonomy, and 'Moral Recklessness'. Kant on Freedom.Dennis Schulting - manuscript
    the essay examines why Kant was conflicted about vaccination, on why vaccination can still be seen as a moral duty and on why a vaccination mandate is not (necessarily) consistent with our rightful, external freedom. It is an essay, not a scholarly paper.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  3
    Vaccines Mandates and Religion: Where Are We Headed with the Current Supreme Court?Dorit R. Reiss - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (4):552-563.
    This article argues that the Supreme Court should not require a religious exemption from vaccine mandates. For children, who cannot yet make autonomous religious decision, religious exemptions would allow parents to make a choice that puts the child at risk and makes the shared environment of the school unsafe — risking other people’s children. For adults, there are still good reasons not to require a religious exemption, since vaccines mandates are adopted for public health reasons, not to target religion, are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  12
    Taking Vaccine Regret and Hesitancy Seriously. The Role of Truth, Conspiracy Theories, Gender Relations and Trust in the HPV Immunisation Programmes in Ireland.Elżbieta Drążkiewicz Grodzicka - 2021 - Journal for Cultural Research 25 (1):69-87.
    . Taking vaccine regret and hesitancy seriously. The role of truth, conspiracy theories, gender relations and trust in the HPV immunisation programmes in Ireland. Journal for Cultural Research: Vol. 25, What should academics do about conspiracy theories? Moving beyond debunking to better deal with conspiratorial movements, misinformation and post-truth., pp. 69-87.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  10
    Which Vaccine? The Cost of Religious Freedom in Vaccination Policy.Alberto Giubilini, Julian Savulescu & Dominic Wilkinson - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (4):609-619.
    We discuss whether and under what conditions people should be allowed to choose which COVID-19 vaccine to receive on the basis of personal ethical views. The problem arises primarily with regard to some religious groups’ concerns about the connection between certain COVID-19 vaccines and abortion. Vaccines currently approved in Western countries make use of foetal cell lines obtained from aborted foetuses either at the testing stage or at the development stage. The Catholic Church’s position is that, if there are alternatives, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Resisting Moral Permissiveness About Vaccine Refusal.Mark Navin - 2013 - Public Affairs Quarterly 27 (1):69-85.
    I argue that a parental prerogative to sometimes prioritize the interests of one’s children over the interests of others is insufficient to make the parental refusal of routine childhood vaccines morally permissible. This is because the moral permissibility of vaccine refusal follows from such a parental prerogative only if the only (weighty) moral reason in favor of vaccination is that vaccination is a means for promoting the interests of others. However, there are two additional weighty moral reasons in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  36. Eating Meat and Not Vaccinating: In Defense of the Analogy.Ben Jones - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):135-142.
    The devastating impact of the COVID‐19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic is prompting renewed scrutiny of practices that heighten the risk of infectious disease. One such practice is refusing available vaccines known to be effective at preventing dangerous communicable diseases. For reasons of preventing individual harm, avoiding complicity in collective harm, and fairness, there is a growing consensus among ethicists that individuals have a duty to get vaccinated. I argue that these same grounds establish an analogous duty to avoid buying and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  33
    Measles Vaccination is Best for Children: The Argument for Relying on Herd Immunity Fails.Johan Bester - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):375-384.
    This article examines an argument which may negatively influence measles vaccination uptake. According to the argument, an individual child in a highly vaccinated society may be better off by being non-vaccinated; the child does not risk vaccine adverse effects and is protected against measles through herd immunity. Firstly, the conclusion of the argument is challenged by showing that herd immunity’s protection is unreliable and inferior to vaccination. Secondly, the logic of the argument is challenged by showing that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  38.  24
    Pandemic Vaccine Trials: Expedite, but Don’T Rush.Angus Dawson - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-12.
    It has been proposed that the urgency of having a vaccine as a response to SARS-CoV-2 is so great, given the potential health, economic and social benefits that we should override the established s...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  88
    Vaccination Policy and Ethical Challenges Posed by Herd Immunity, Suboptimal Uptake and Subgroup Targeting.J. Luyten, A. Vandevelde, P. Van Damme & P. Beutels - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (3):280-291.
    Vaccination policy is an ethically challenging domain of public policy. It is a matter of collective importance that reaches into the most private sphere of citizens and unavoidably conflicts with individual-based ethics. Policy makers need to walk a tight rope in order to complement utilitarian public health values with individual autonomy rights, protection of privacy, non-discrimination and protection of the worst-off. Whether vaccination is voluntary or compulsory, universal or targeted, every option faces complex ethical hurdles because of the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40.  7
    Mandatory Vaccination Support and Intentions to Get Vaccinated for COVID ‐19: Results From a Nationally Representative General Population Survey in October 2020 in Greece. [REVIEW]Theodoros V. Giannouchos, Evaggelia Steletou, Maria Saridi & Kyriakos Souliotis - 2021 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 27 (4):996-1003.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. Mandating Vaccination: What Counts as a "Mandate" in Public Health and When Should They Be Used?Matthew K. Wynia - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):2 – 6.
    Recent arguments over whether certain public health interventions should be mandatory raise questions about what counts as a "mandate." A mandate is not the same as a mere recommendation or the standard of practice. At minimum, a mandate should require an active opt-out and there should be some penalty for refusing to abide by it. Over-loose use of the term "mandate" and the easing of opt-out provisions could eventually pose a risk to the gains that truly mandatory public health interventions, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  42.  11
    Measles Vaccination is Best for Children: The Argument for Relying on Herd Immunity Fails.Johan Bester - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):375-384.
    This article examines an argument which may negatively influence measles vaccination uptake. According to the argument, an individual child in a highly vaccinated society may be better off by being non-vaccinated; the child does not risk vaccine adverse effects and is protected against measles through herd immunity. Firstly, the conclusion of the argument is challenged by showing that herd immunity’s protection is unreliable and inferior to vaccination. Secondly, the logic of the argument is challenged by showing that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43. COVID-19 Vaccination Should Not Be Mandatory for Health and Social Care Workers.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (1):27-39.
    A COVID-19 vaccine mandate is being introduced for health and social care workers in England, and those refusing to comply will either be redeployed or have their employment terminated. We argue th...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  7
    Should Vaccination Be Mandated? Individuals' Perceptions on Mandatory Vaccination in Greece.Theodoros V. Giannouchos, Evaggelia Steletou, Maria Saridi & Kyriakos Souliotis - forthcoming - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  9
    Exploring Vaccine Hesitancy Through an Artist–Scientist Collaboration: Visualizing Vaccine-Critical Parents’ Health Beliefs.Kaisu Koski & Johan Holst - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (3):411-426.
    This project explores vaccine hesitancy through an artist–scientist collaboration. It aims to create better understanding of vaccine hesitant parents’ health beliefs and how these influence their vaccine-critical decisions. The project interviews vaccine-hesitant parents in the Netherlands and Finland and develops experimental visual-narrative means to analyse the interview data. Vaccine-hesitant parents’ health beliefs are, in this study, expressed through stories, and they are paralleled with so-called illness narratives. The study explores the following four main health beliefs originating from the parents’ interviews: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. Vaccination Ethics.Angus Dawson - 2011 - In Public Health Ethics: Key Concepts and Issues in Policy and Practice. New York, USA: Cambridge University Press. pp. 143-153.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  47.  52
    Online Information of Vaccines: Information Quality, Not Only Privacy, is an Ethical Responsibility of Search Engines.Pietro Ghezzi, Peter Bannister, Gonzalo Casino, Alessia Catalani, Michel Goldman, Jessica Morley, Marie Neunez, Andreu Prados-Bo, Pierre Robert Smeeters, Mariarosaria Taddeo, Tania Vanzolini & Luciano Floridi - 2021 - Frontiers in Medicine 7.
    The fact that Internet companies may record our personal data and track our online behavior for commercial or political purpose has emphasized aspects related to online privacy. This has also led to the development of search engines that promise no tracking and privacy. Search engines also have a major role in spreading low-quality health information such as that of anti-vaccine websites. This study investigates the relationship between search engines’ approach to privacy and the scientific quality of the information they return. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  80
    Prioritizing Vaccine Access for Vulnerable but Stigmatized Groups.C. Kaposy & N. Bandrauk - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (3):283-295.
    This article discusses the prioritization of scarce and in-demand influenza vaccines during a pandemic. The mass vaccination campaign in Canada against H1N1 influenza in 2009 illustrated that some groups considered vulnerable may also be stigmatized. In 2009, prisoners and people with severe obesity were given priority of H1N1 vaccination in some Canadian jurisdictions. Assigning priority for vaccination to such groups may be socially unpopular. This article examines a number of possible arguments that might motivate opposition to prioritizing (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49.  26
    Raising Rates of Childhood Vaccination: The Trade-Off Between Coercion and Trust.Bridget Haire, Paul Komesaroff, Rose Leontini & C. Raina MacIntyre - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (2):199-209.
    Vaccination is a highly effective public health strategy that provides protection to both individuals and communities from a range of infectious diseases. Governments monitor vaccination rates carefully, as widespread use of a vaccine within a population is required to extend protection to the general population through “herd immunity,” which is important for protecting infants who are not yet fully vaccinated and others who are unable to undergo vaccination for medical or other reasons. Australia is unique in employing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50.  7
    Vaccine-Associated Shingles: What Do We Owe Varicella Vaccine Recipients in Adulthood?Margaret K. Doll & Barry DeCoster - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (9):78-80.
    Volume 20, Issue 9, September 2020, Page 78-80.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000