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  1. Vaccine mandates, value pluralism, and policy diversity.Mark C. Navin & Katie Attwell - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (9):1042-1049.
    Political communities across the world have recently sought to tackle rising rates of vaccine hesitancy and refusal, by implementing coercive immunization programs, or by making existing immunization programs more coercive. Many academics and advocates of public health have applauded these policy developments, and they have invoked ethical reasons for implementing or strengthening vaccine mandates. Others have criticized these policies on ethical grounds, for undermining liberty, and as symptoms of broader government overreach. But such arguments often obscure or abstract away from (...)
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    Vaccine Rejecting Parents’ Engagement With Expert Systems That Inform Vaccination Programs.Katie Attwell, Julie Leask, Samantha B. Meyer, Philippa Rokkas & Paul Ward - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):65-76.
    In attempting to provide protection to individuals and communities, childhood immunization has benefits that far outweigh disease risks. However, some parents decide not to immunize their children with some or all vaccines for reasons including lack of trust in governments, health professionals, and vaccine manufacturers. This article employs a theoretical analysis of trust and distrust to explore how twenty-seven parents with a history of vaccine rejection in two Australian cities view the expert systems central to vaccination policy and practice. Our (...)
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    Making salient ethics arguments about vaccine mandates: A California case study.Mark C. Navin & Katie Attwell - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (9):854-861.
    Vaccine mandates can take many forms, and different kinds of mandates can implicate an array of values in diverse ways. It follows that good ethics arguments about particular vaccine mandates will attend to the details of individual policies. Furthermore, attention to particular mandate policies—and to attributes of the communities they aim to govern—can also illuminate which ethics arguments may be more salient in particular contexts. If ethicists want their arguments to make a difference in policy, they should attend to these (...)
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    Childhood vaccine refusal and what to do about it: a systematic review of the ethical literature.Kerrie Wiley, Maria Christou-Ergos, Chris Degeling, Rosalind McDougall, Penelope Robinson, Katie Attwell, Catherine Helps, Shevaun Drislane & Stacy M. Carter - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-17.
    Background Parental refusal of routine childhood vaccination remains an ethically contested area. This systematic review sought to explore and characterise the normative arguments made about parental refusal of routine vaccination, with the aim of providing researchers, practitioners, and policymakers with a synthesis of current normative literature. Methods Nine databases covering health and ethics research were searched, and 121 publications identified for the period Jan 1998 to Mar 2022. For articles, source journals were categorised according to Australian Standard Field of Research (...)
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  5. Childhood Vaccination Mandates: Scope, Sanctions, Severity, Selectivity, and Salience.Katie Attwell & Mark Christopher Navin - 2019 - Milbank Quarterly 97 (4):978–1014.
    Context In response to outbreaks of vaccine‐preventable disease and increasing rates of vaccine refusal, some political communities have recently implemented coercive childhood immunization programs, or they have made existing childhood immunization programs more coercive. Many other political communities possess coercive vaccination policies, and others are considering developing them. Scholars and policymakers generally refer to coercive immunization policies as “vaccine mandates.” However, mandatory vaccination is not a unitary concept. Rather, coercive childhood immunization policies are complex, context‐specific instruments. Their legally and morally (...)
     
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    How policymakers employ ethical frames to design and introduce new policies: the case of childhood vaccine mandates in Australia.Katie Attwell & Mark Christopher Navin - 2022 - Policy and Politics 50 (4):526-547.
    Australian states exclude unvaccinated children from early education and care via ‘No Jab No Play’ policies, but some offer exemptions for the socially disadvantaged. Such mandatory vaccination policies provoke heated arguments about morality and potential downstream impacts, and the politics of which kinds of people get exempted from mandates are often fraught. Synthesising existing frameworks for considering the role of moral principles and rational-technical justifications in policymaking, we show how the same values can be the focus of both ‘rational-instrumental’ and (...)
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    School staff as vaccine advocates: Perspectives on vaccine mandates and the student registration process.Mark Christopher Navin, Aaron Scherer, Ethan Bradley & Katie Attwell - 2023 - Vaccine 41 (5):1169-1175.
    Recently, several states in the US have made it more difficult to receive nonmedical exemptions to school vaccine mandates in the hope of better orienting parents towards vaccination. However, little is known about how public-facing school staff implement and enforce mandate policies, including why or how often they steer parents towards nonmedical exemptions. This study focused on Michigan, which has recently added an additional burden for families seeking nonmedical exemptions. We used an anonymous online survey to assess Michigan public-school employees (...)
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