Results for 'Technology and civilization'

988 found
Order:
  1.  23
    Technology and civil disobedience: Why engineers have a special duty to obey the law.Eugene Schlossberger - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (2):163-168.
    Engineers have a greater responsibility than many other professionals not to commit civil disobedience in performing their jobs as engineers. It does not follow that engineers have no responsibility for their company’s actions. Morally, engineer may be required to speak out within the company or even publicly against her company. An engineer may be required to work on a project or quit her job. None of these acts, generally, are against the law. An engineer may be morally required to commit (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2. Technology and Civilization.David Brown - 1941 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 22 (3):281.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  44
    Information technology and civilization.Hiroshi Inose & John Pierce - 1984 - World Futures 19 (3):293-303.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  34
    Technology and civil disobedience: Why engineers have a special duty to obey the law. [REVIEW]Dr Eugene Schlossberger - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (2):163-168.
    Engineers have a greater responsibility than many other professionals not to commit civil disobedience in performing their jobs as engineers. It does not follow that engineers have no responsibility for their company’s actions. Morally, engineer may be required to speak out within the company or even publicly against her company. An engineer may be required to work on a project or quit her job. None of these acts, generally, are against the law. An engineer may be morally required to commit (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  57
    Commentary on “technology and civil disobedience: Why engineers have a special duty to obey the law”.Roger M. Boisjoly - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (2):169-171.
  6.  63
    Technology and the civil epistemology of democracy.Yaron Ezrahi - 1992 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 35 (3-4):363 – 376.
    In analogy with Rousseau's concept of ?civil religion? as a system of ?positive dogmas?, ?without which?, as he observed, ?a man cannot be a good citizen?, this paper advances the concept of ?civil epistemology? as the positive dogmas without which the agents of government actions cannot be held accountable by democratic citizens. The civil epistemology of democracy shapes the citizen's views on the nature of political reality, on how the facts of political reality can be known and by whom. Modern (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  8
    Technology and the Growth of Civilization.Giancarlo Genta & Paolo Riberi - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    Our natural world has been irretrievably altered by humans, for humans. From domesticated wheat fields to nuclear power plants and spacecraft, everything we see and interact with has in some way been changed by the presence of our species, starting from the Neolithic era so many centuries ago. This book provides a crash course on the issues and debates surrounding technology’s shifting place in our society. It covers the history of our increasingly black-box world, which some theorize will end (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  8
    Science and Civilization in China, Vol. 4, Physics and Physical Technology. Part I: Physics.L. Carrington Goodrich & Joseph Needham - 1962 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 82 (3):455.
  9.  60
    Creating Inquiry Between Technology Developers and Civil Society Actors: Learning from Experiences Around Nanotechnology.Lotte Krabbenborg - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (3):907-922.
    Engaging civil society actors as knowledgeable dialogue partners in the development and governance of emerging technologies is a new challenge. The starting point of this paper is the observation that the design and orchestration of current organized interaction events shows limitations, particularly in the articulation of issues and in learning how to address the indeterminacies that go with emerging technologies. This paper uses Dewey’s notion of ‘publics’ and ‘reflective inquiry’ to outline ways of doing better and to develop requirements for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  10.  29
    Knowledge and Civilization.Barry Allen - 2003 - Westview Press.
    Knowledge and Civilization advances detailed criticism of philosophy's usual approach to knowledge and describes a redirection, away from textbook problems of epistemology, toward an ecological philosophy of technology and civilization. Rejecting theories that confine knowledge to language or discourse, Allen situates knowledge in the greater field of artifacts, technical performance, and human evolution. His wide ranging considerations draw on ideas from evolutionary biology, archaeology, anthropology, and the history of cities, art, and technology.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  11.  3
    Technology and Values in American Civilization: A Guide to Information Sources by Stephen H. Cutcliffe; Judith A. Mistichelli; Christine M. Roysdon. [REVIEW]Carl Mitcham - 1982 - Isis 73:111-112.
  12.  9
    Science and Civilization in China. Vol. V. Chemistry and Chemical Technology Part 2: Spagyrical Discovery and Invention: Magisteries of Gold and Immortality. [REVIEW]John Louton & Joseph Needham - 1979 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 99 (2):314.
  13.  17
    Technology and Values in American Civilization: A Guide to Information Sources. Stephen H. Cutcliffe, Judith A. Mistichelli, Christine M. Roysdon. [REVIEW]Carl Mitcham - 1982 - Isis 73 (1):111-112.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  10
    Technology- and Product-Oriented Movements: Approximating Social Movement Studies and Science and Technology Studies.David J. Hess - 2005 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 30 (4):515-535.
    Technology- and product-oriented movements are mobilizations of civil society organizations that generally include alliances with private-sector firms, for which the target of social change is support for an alternative technology and/or product, as well as the policies with which they are associated. TPMs generally involve “private-sector symbiosis,” that is, a mixture of advocacy organizations/networks and private-sector firms. Case studies of nutritional therapeutics, wind energy, and open-source software are used to explore the tendency for large corporations in established industries (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  15.  2
    Facial profiling technology and discrimination: a new threat to civil rights in liberal democracies.Michael Joseph Gentzel - 2024 - Philosophical Studies 181 (6):1369-1392.
    This paper offers the first philosophical analysis of a form of artificial intelligence (AI) which the author calls facial profiling technology (FPT). FPT is a type of facial analysis technology designed to predict criminal behavior based solely on facial structure. Marketed for use by law enforcement, face classifiers generated by the program can supposedly identify murderers, thieves, pedophiles, and terrorists prior to the commission of crimes. At the time of this writing, an FPT company has a contract with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. ""Down with" Liberation Technologies": Internet, Civil Society and Politics in China.Eric Sautede - 2009 - Hermès: La Revue Cognition, communication, politique 55 (3):133 - +.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  45
    Biometric Technology and Ethics: Beyond Security Applications.Andrea North-Samardzic - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (3):433-450.
    Biometric technology was once the purview of security, with face recognition and fingerprint scans used for identification and law enforcement. This is no longer the case; biometrics is increasingly used for commercial and civil applications. Due to the widespread diffusion of biometrics, it is important to address the ethical issues inherent to the development and deployment of the technology. This article explores the burgeoning research on biometrics for non-security purposes and the ethical implications for organizations. This will be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18.  8
    Philosophy, Technology, and the Arts in the Early Modern Era.Paolo Rossi & Benjamin Nelson - 1970 - Harper & Row.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19.  6
    Technological humanity--civilization induced by science.T. Michniowski - 2000 - Dialogue and Universalism 10:99-106.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  10
    Smart Technologies and the End(s) of Law. Novel entanglements of Law and Technology.Mireille Hildebrandt - 2015 - Aberdeen: Edward Elgar.
    This timely book tells the story of the smart technologies that reconstruct our world, by provoking their most salient functionality: the prediction and preemption of our day-to-day activities, preferences, health and credit risks, criminal intent and spending capacity. Mireille Hildebrandt claims that we are in transit between an information society and a data-driven society, which has far reaching consequences for the world we depend on. She highlights how the pervasive employment of machine-learning technologies that inform so-called ‘data-driven agency’ threaten privacy, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  10
    Technology and Our Relationship with God.O. P. Anselm Ramelow - 2024 - Nova et Vetera 22 (1):159-186.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Technology and Our Relationship with GodAnselm Ramelow O.P.God's Original Plan and the FallTechnology may appear to be a very secular thing, but to assume that technology can be understood without God would be a mistake. Technology is deeply involved in our relationship with God. This involvement is, moreover, profoundly ambivalent.1To begin with the positive side of this ambivalence: the growing awareness of the dangers of (...) should not lead Christians to think that technology is necessarily a bad thing. It is, in fact, not even merely a "necessary evil." Rather, we can find in the use of technology an unfolding of our God-given rational nature. If we believe that God "made us in his image and likeness," then this quite directly implies two things: (1) God is a maker (he made us), and (2) since he made us in his image and likeness, we are makers as well. The making of technology thus reflects our dignity as made in the image and likeness of God.2 Accordingly, the Church has been more positive towards the development of technology than one might expect, and some of our technologies (e.g., agricultural, architectural, and time-keeping technologies) have their roots in medieval monasteries.3 [End Page 159]We should therefore expect that Adam and Eve, had they not fallen, nevertheless would have become makers of technology in some form or other. They would have exhibited inventiveness and tool use, though perhaps not a tool use focused on warding off evil (which did not exist in Eden), but concerned with promoting positive forms life, such as tools of art and communication. Art and communication technologies are, like all tools, means to an end; but these in particular contain their ends in themselves. In Aristotelian terms, their making (poiesis) concerns a praxis (such as "making conversation"). That is why we sometimes forget to list such technologies among our typical examples of technologies. We forget, for example, that, among the technologies of communication, language as a physical tool (sounds or written marks) is an obvious example. And it is a prelapsarian feature: the book of Genesis has Adam naming things before the Fall. In doing so, Adam echoes God's own creative "technique" of speaking or calling things into being.4 Even in its oral form, language is a matter of human making and a technology of communication. In paradise, communication would not have been merely instrumental, not merely a means, but an intrinsic good, embodying knowledge and intersubjective communion.Other forms of prelapsarian technology, however, are a matter of speculation. And whether or not one agrees with Jacques Ellul's thesis that there was no such prelapsarian technology,5 the ambivalence of technology is clear from the very beginning as well. This is at least what we see in the book of Genesis. For, as a matter of biblical record, it was Cain and his descendants who founded cities and developed technology (e.g., Tubal-Cain as the "forger of all instruments of bronze and iron" in Gen 4:22). And the history [End Page 160] of these urban civilizations does not display the best part of human behavior. But if, as we have said, technology is not necessarily a bad thing, then this must be a corruption of technology. What might this corruption consist in?I want to suggest that it consists precisely in the corruption of our relationship with God, from which technology can never abstract and in which it is, for better or for worse, embedded. Unsurprisingly, therefore, as technology progresses, this relationship becomes more and more explicit, and it does so in a paradoxical way: initially, it is an attempt to put humanity in charge and control, to replace our need for reliance on God by allowing us to play God ourselves. But in our current situation, particularly with the emergence of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, the roles appear reversed: rather than putting humanity in charge, technology in turn is increasingly in control—to the point of becoming itself a god or idol that rules human life. As a result, we only end up having replaced one God with another... (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  4
    Energy, Technology and Geopolitics.John R. Fanchi - 2012 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 359–363.
    This chapter contains sections titled: References and Further Reading.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  9
    The Fate of Western Civilization: G. H. von Wright’s Reflections on Science, Technology, and Global Society.Topi Heikkerö - 2004 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 24 (2):156-162.
    This article introduces the central ideas of G. H. von Wright’s cultural philosophy concerning the techno-scientific form of life. Georg Henrik von Wright (1916-2003) was best known for his achievements in the field of modal logic and for his association with LudwigWittgenstein. However, his work also included a critical analysis of science and technology. von Wright was concerned about ecological problems, human alienation, and the breakdown of traditional value systems. He analyzed the historical roots of modern techno-science. According to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  63
    Converging technologies and human destiny.William Sims Bainbridge - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (3):197 – 216.
    The rapid fertility decline in most advanced industrial nations, coupled with secularization and the disintegration of the family, is a sign that Western Civilization is beginning to collapse, even while radical religious movements pose challenges to Western dominance. Under such dire circumstances, it is pointless to be cautious about developing new Converging Technologies. Historical events are undermining the entire basis of ethical decision-making, so it is necessary to seek a new basis for ethics in the intellectual unification of science (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25.  15
    Religion and civilization in the sociology of Norbert Elias: Fantasy–reality balances in long-term perspective.Andrew Linklater - 2023 - History of the Human Sciences 36 (1):56-79.
    Many sociologists have drawn attention to the puzzling absence of a detailed discussion of religion in Elias’s investigation of the European civilizing process. Elias did not develop a sociology of religion, but he did not overlook the importance of beliefs in the ‘spirit world’ in the history of human societies. In his writings such convictions were described as fantasy images that could be contrasted with ‘reality-congruent’ knowledge claims. Elias placed fantasy–reality balances, whether religious or secular, at the centre of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  21
    Progress and Civilization in Whitehead.Dwayne Schulz - 2020 - Process Studies 49 (2):188-208.
    This article is an attempt to analyze and criticize, both positively and negatively. Whitehead's concept of progress. Whitehead's progressive cosmology is critically examined, as is the relationship between technology and moral progress. The fragility of progress is emphasized.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  4
    Technology and Human Destiny.Henryk Skolimowski - 1983 - Dr. S. Radhakrishnan Institute for Advanced Study in Philosophy, University of Madras.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  50
    Technology and Freudian Discontent: Freud’s‘Muffled’ Meliorism and the Problem of Human Annihilation.M. Andrew Holowchak - 2010 - Sophia 49 (1):95-111.
    This paper is a comprehensive investigation of Freud’s views on technology and human well-being, with a focus on ‘Civilization and Its Discontents’. In spite of his thesis in ‘Civilization and Its Discontents’, I shall argue that Freud, always in some measure under the influence of Comtean progressivism, was consistently a meliorist: He was always at least guardedly optimistic about the realizable prospect of utopia, under the ‘soft dictatorship’ of reason and guided by advances in science and (...), in spite of due recognition in his later years of the possibility of annihilation through technological advances in warfare. The possibility of human annihilation, then, muffled Freud’s meliorism. Freud’s ‘muffled meliorism’, however, was not a quiet commitment to viewing technology as something good. Ultimately, Freud steered a middle course between techno-advocacy and techno-antagonism. The technologies of science, like the discoveries of psychoanalysis, were tools for humans that could be used for human betterment or, as war showed, for human degeneration. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  5
    Modern Technology and Technological Determinism: The Empire Strikes Again.Mauricio Ramos Alvarez - 1999 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 19 (5):403-410.
    In spite of the discredited notions of determinism during the last two decades, the idea of technological determinism strikes again, based on the social impacts of modern technology. The main objective of this article attempts to study the relation between civilization, modern technology, and development. To attain our objective, the debate is presented on the issue of whether the current management of technology contributes to the guidance of technological development on the basis of “social priorities.”.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  13
    The Traditional Crafts of Persia. Their Development, Technology, and Influence on Eastern and Western Civilizations.Donald N. Wilber & Hans E. Wulff - 1969 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 89 (1):298.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  4
    Extractive Technologies and Civic Networks’ Fight for Sustainable Development.Mikhail A. Molchanov - 2011 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 31 (1):55-67.
    This article describes the fight of transnational civic networks to influence business development strategies and counter the threats to environmental and labor rights posed by the construction and exploitation of the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) oil pipeline in Transcaucasia. The article starts by discussing the role of civil society in the global struggle for sustainable development. Then a brief overview of the geopolitical significance of the Transcaucasian-Caspian region in today’s oil and gas markets is presented. The case study looks at how the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  31
    Science, technology and modernity: Beck and Derrida on the politics of risk.Ross Abbinnett - 2000 - Cultural Values 4 (1):101-126.
    The purpose of the article is to evaluate the ethical and political conclusions that Ulrich Beck draws from his account of ‘civilization risks’. I have argued that the categories of ‘life’, ‘the organic’, and the ‘technological’ which are presented in Risk Society, presuppose a certain metaphysics of ‘natural’ human identity; and that it is the inscription of this identity in the politics of risk administration which opens the possibility of an absolutely legitimized regulation of nature, humanity, and society. Thus, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  7
    Digital Technology and the Mythologies of Globalization.David J. Staley - 1998 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 18 (6):421-425.
    The apparently universal presence of digital technology is an insufficient condition for a global civilization. An examination of the distribution of the physical hardware of cyberspace reveals deep continuities with earlier patterns of international commerce and information flow, which contradict the supposedly revolutionary nature of the global information network. These patterns have reflected and continue to reflect hierarchical power relations—not global harmony—between the technological haves and have-nots.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  8
    International scientific relations: science, technology and innovation in the international system of the 21st century.Francisco Del Canto Viterale - 2021 - London: Anthem Press.
    International Scientific Relations offers a holistic analysis of the role and impact of science, technology, and innovation in the international system of the twenty-first century.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  6
    Terrorism, Civil Liberties, and Preventive Approaches to Technology: The Difficult Choices Western Societies Face in the War on Terrorism.Arnd Jürgensen - 2004 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 24 (1):55-59.
    This article explores public policy alternatives to the current war on terrorism. Western society’s vulnerability to terrorism has been dealt with primarily by expanding the law enforcement and surveillance authority of governments at the expense of the freedoms and civil liberties of the public. This approach threatens to undermine the prerequisites to meaningful democratic institutions. An alternative public policy might target high-risk technologies (civilian airlines, nuclear reactors, etc.) as the source of vulnerability to terrorism, thereby protecting civil liberties by reducing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  25
    Reviewing policies on satellite broadcasts in east asia: New technology, political economy, and civil society.Amos Owen Thomas - 2003 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 16 (3):103-112.
  37.  13
    The Traditional Crafts of Persia: Their Development, Technology, and Influence on Eastern and Western Civilizations.Schuyler Cammann & Hans E. Wulff - 1969 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 89 (1):299.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  30
    Matter and psyche: Lewis Mumford's appropriation of Marx and Jung in his appraisal of the condition of man in technological civilization.Adam Green - 2006 - History of the Human Sciences 19 (3):33-64.
    The aim of this article is to draw attention to the breadth and importance of Mumford's philosophical outlook by exploring his critical appropriation of the theories of Marx and Jung which he employed to create a penetrating, visionary collection of works that offer us a powerful and timely insight into the ills besetting our current technological civilization. Mumford partially accepted Marx's matter–psyche dynamic but expanded it to include architecture, technology and urban planning. He surpassed the one-way process of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Sustainable development on the crossroads+ sustainability of civilization, economic, technological and environmental aspects.J. Letasi - 1996 - Filozofia 51 (2):70-79.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  11
    Writing: Theory and History of the Technology of Civilization (review).Marc Pierce - 2012 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 105 (4):566-567.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  31
    The vital machine: a study of technology and organic life.David F. Channell - 1991 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In 1738, Jacques Vaucanson unveiled his masterpiece before the court of Louis XV: a gilded copper duck that ate, drank, quacked, flapped its wings, splashed about, and, most astonishing of all, digested its food and excreted the remains. The imitation of life by technology fascinated Vaucanson's contemporaries. Today our technology is more powerful, but our fascination is tempered with apprehension. Artificial intelligence and genetic engineering, to name just two areas, raise profoundly disturbing ethical issues that undermine our most (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  42.  20
    Image: three inquiries in technology and imagination.Mark C. Taylor, Mary-Jane Rubenstein & Thomas A. Carlson (eds.) - 2021 - London: University of Chicago Press.
    What are the primary characteristics that define what it means to be human? And what happens to those characteristics in the face of technology past, present, and future? The three essays in Image, by leading philosophers of religion Mark Taylor, Mary-Jane Rubenstein, and Thomas Carlson, play at this intersection of the human and the technological, building out from Heidegger's notion that humans master the world by picturing or representing the real.Taylor's essay traces a history of capitalism, dwelling on the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. COEVOLUTIONARY SEMANTICS OF TECHNOLOGICAL CIVILIZATION GENESIS AND EVOLUTIONARY RISK (BETWEEN THE BIOAESTHETICS AND BIOPOLITICS).V. T. Cheshko & O. N. Kuz - 2016 - Anthropological Dimensions of Philosophical Studies (10):43-55.
    Purpose (metatask) of the present work is to attempt to give a glance at the problem of existential and anthropo- logical risk caused by the contemporary man-made civilization from the perspective of comparison and confronta- tion of aesthetics, the substrate of which is emotional and metaphorical interpretation of individual subjective values and politics feeding by objectively rational interests of social groups. In both cases there is some semantic gap pre- sent between the represented social reality and its representation in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  44
    Synapses, Schizophrenia, and Civilization: What Made Homo Sapient?Lyman A. Page - 2007 - Zygon 42 (3):767-778.
    . Progress in technology has allowed dynamic research on the development of the human brain that has revolutionized concepts. Particularly, the notions of plasticity, neuronal selection, and the effects of afferent stimuli have entered into thinking about brain development. Here I focus on development from the age of four years to early adulthood, during which a 30 percent reduction in some brain synapses occurs that is out of proportion to changes in neuronal numbers. This corresponds temporally with changes in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  26
    The History of Writing - Powell Writing. Theory and History of the Technology of Civilization. Pp. xx + 276, ills, maps. Malden, MA and Oxford: Wiley–Blackwell, 2009. Cased, £50, €60. ISBN: 978-1-4051-6256-2. [REVIEW]Steve Reece - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (2):585-587.
  46.  7
    From commodification to the common good: reconstructing science, technology, and society.Hans Radder - 2019 - Pittsburgh, Pa.: University of Pittsburgh Press.
    The commodification of science—often identified with commercialization, or the selling of expertise and research results and the “capitalization of knowledge” in academia and beyond—has been investigated as a threat to the autonomy of science and academic culture and criticized for undermining the social responsibility of modern science. In From Commodification to the Common Good, Hans Radder revisits the commodification of the sciences from a philosophical perspective to focus instead on a potential alternative, the notion of public-interest science. Scientific knowledge, he (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  22
    Science and Civilization in China, Vol. 2, History of Scientific Thought. [REVIEW]C. C. V. - 1956 - Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):366-367.
    The second installment of Dr. Needham's epic venture into the intellectual history of ancient and medieval China. The work's general emphasis is upon science and technology; the present volume expounds the teachings of the main philosophical systems and schools--Confucianism, Taoism, Mohism, etc.--and describes their bearing upon the scientific thinking of their times. The detail with which these accounts are carried out is staggering, yet the narrative line remains clear. The work's scope, too, is incredible, as Dr. Needham delves fully (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  12
    Art, form, and civilization.Ernest Mundt - 1952 - Berkeley,: University of California Press.
    This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1952.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  12
    Transparent space: Law, technology and deliberative democracy in the information society.Beth Simone Noveck - 1999 - Cultural Values 3 (4):472-491.
    The resuscitation of deliberative democracy in the Information Age requires the construction of transparent public spaces ‐ public arenas where power relationships between speakers are discernible and debate ensues according to the rules of civility and reason (conversational transparency). The metaphor of transparency, in the sense of legal accountability, also connects the role of communications regulation to the development of democratic political culture (legal transparency). Finally, transparency suggests the power of technology to obscure and hinder as well as help (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  30
    Coevolutionary semantics of technological civilization genesis and evolutionary risk.V. T. Cheshko & O. M. Kuz - 2016 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 10:43-55.
    Purpose of the present work is to attempt to give a glance at the problem of existential and anthropological risk caused by the contemporary man-made civilization from the perspective of comparison and confrontation of aesthetics, the substrate of which is emotional and metaphorical interpretation of individual subjective values and politics feeding by objectively rational interests of social groups. In both cases there is some semantic gap present between the represented social reality and its representation in perception of works of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 988