Results for 'Doug Childers'

452 found
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  1.  19
    Media practices in aids coverage and a model for ethical reporting on aids victims.Doug Childers - 1988 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 3 (2):60 – 65.
    With AIDS increasingly recognized as a potentially devastating disease, no concensus has emerged in the media about such AIDS?coverage questions as use of names of AIDS victims, whether cause of death of AIDS victims should be reported and what moral limitations should restrict AIDS coverage. A study of AIDS coverage in two major newspapers and two news magazines in 1987 identify weaknesses in current coverage of the AIDS phenomenon and suggests guidelines for ethical reporting ? servicing the greater good without (...)
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  2.  28
    A Fictionalist Account of Open-Label Placebo.Doug Hardman - 2024 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 49 (3):246-256.
    The placebo effect is now generally defined widely as an individual’s response to the psychosocial context of a clinical treatment, as distinct from the treatment’s characteristic physiological effects. Some researchers, however, argue that such a wide definition leads to confusion and misleading implications. In response, they propose a narrow definition restricted to the therapeutic effects of deliberate placebo treatments. Within the framework of modern medicine, such a scope currently leaves one viable placebo treatment paradigm: the non-deceptive and non-concealed administration of (...)
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  3.  16
    UK doctors’ strikes 2023: not only justified but, arguably, supererogatory.Doug McConnell & Darren Mann - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):152-156.
    The 2023 doctors’ strikes in the UK have elicited a familiar moral outcry that such strikes are morally wrong. We consider five arguments that might be thought to show doctors’ strikes are morally impermissible but show that they all fail. The most we can conclude from such arguments is that doctors’ strikes are morally permissible in a narrower range of circumstances than strikes in other sectors.We then outline two independent but compatible justifications for doctors’ strikes, one that appeals to doctors’ (...)
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  4.  7
    Between words and worlds: a festschrift for Pavel Materna.Timothy Childers, Jari Palomäki & Pavel Materna (eds.) - 2000 - Prague: Filosofia.
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  5. On the Meaning of Prescriptions.Timothy Childers & Vladimir Svoboda - 2003 - In Jaroslav Peregrin (ed.), Meaning: the dynamic turn. Oxford, UK: Elsevier Science. pp. 185--200.
     
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  6. the logica yearbook 1999.Timothy Childers (ed.) - 2000 - Prague:
     
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  7.  5
    Govemment Funding of the Arts.Donna E. Childers - 1993 - Social Philosophy Today 8:313-327.
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  8.  16
    Two Odes. Pindar & Translated by Chris Childers - 2013 - Arion 21 (2):1-10.
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  9.  15
    The Inner Lives of Doctors: Physician Emotion in the Care of the Seriously Ill.Julie Childers & Bob Arnold - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (12):29-34.
    Elisabeth Kübler-Ross’ seminal 1969 work, On Death and Dying, opened the door to understanding individuals’ emotional experiences with serious illness and dying. Patient’s emotions, however, are on...
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  10. Hobbesian mechanics.Doug Jesseph - 2003 - In Daniel Garber & Steven M. Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 3--119.
     
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  11. Platonic Personal Immortality.Doug Reed - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (3):812-836.
    I argue that Plato distinguishes between personal immortality and immortality of the soul. I begin by criticizing the consensus view that Plato identifies the person and the soul. I then turn to the issue of immortality. By considering passages from 'Symposium' and 'Timaeus', I make the case that Plato thinks that while the soul is immortal by nature, if a person is going to be immortal, they must become so. Finally, I argue that Plato has a psychological continuity approach to (...)
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  12.  41
    “Should It Be Considered Plagiarism?” Student Perceptions of Complex Citation Issues.Dan Childers & Sam Bruton - 2016 - Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (1):1-17.
    Most research on student plagiarism defines the concept very narrowly or with much ambiguity. Many studies focus on plagiarism involving large swaths of text copied and pasted from unattributed sources, a type of plagiarism that the overwhelming majority of students seem to have little trouble identifying. Other studies rely on ambiguous definitions, assuming students understand what the term means and requesting that they self-report how well they understand the concept. This study attempts to avoid these problems by examining student perceptions (...)
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  13. Releasing the visual archive : on the ethics of destruction.Doug Bailey - 2021 - In Bjørnar Olsen, Mats Burström, Caitlin DeSilvey & Þóra Pétursdóttir (eds.), After discourse: things, affects, ethics. Routledge.
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  14.  15
    Where the ethical action is.Doug Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (1):45–48.
    It is common to think of medical and ethical modes of thought as different in kind. In such terms, some clinical situations are made more complicated by an additional ethical component. Against this picture, we propose that medical and ethical modes of thought are not different in kind, but merely different aspects of what it means to be human. We further propose that clinicians are uniquely positioned to synthesise these two aspects without prior knowledge of philosophical ethics.
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  15. BioProjects: Independent Research in Bio 101.Doug Carmichael - 2001 - Inquiry (ERIC) 6 (1):5-11.
     
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  16. Wisdom, Love, and Friendship in Ancient Greek Philosophy: Essays in Honor of Daniel Devereux.Doug Reed (ed.) - 2020 - Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter.
     
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  17. Divide and multiply: culture and politics in the new medical order.Doug White - 1995 - In Paul A. Komesaroff (ed.), Troubled bodies: critical perspectives on postmodernism, medical ethics, and the body. Durham: Duke University Press. pp. 20--37.
  18.  47
    Listeners, not Leeches: What Virginia Tech Survivors Needed from Journalists.Kim Walsh-Childers, Norman P. Lewis & Jeffrey Neely - 2011 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (3):191 - 205.
    Journalists covering the 2007 shootings at Virginia Tech aggravated the trauma felt by victims' families and survivors, raising ethical questions about the role of media at major news events in an Internet-enabled era of continuous coverage. Some journalists breached professional norms by knocking on doors at 6 a.m., claiming a hidden camera was a breast pump and bullying reluctant interviewees. Even conscientious journalists, however, exacerbated the ordeal through their overabundance. By forcing survivors to endure repetitious interviews and making mourners feel (...)
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  19. Degrees of Virtue in the Nicomachean Ethics.Doug Reed - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):91-112.
    I argue that Aristotle believes that virtue comes in degrees. After dispatching with initial concerns for the view, I argue that we should accept it because Aristotle conceives of heroic virtue as the highest degree of virtue. I support this interpretation of heroic virtue by considering and rejecting alternative readings, then showing that heroic virtue characterized as the highest degree of virtue is consistent with the doctrine of the mean.
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  20.  35
    Male Androphilia in the Ancestral Environment.Doug P. VanderLaan, Zhiyuan Ren & Paul L. Vasey - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (4):375-401.
    The kin selection hypothesis posits that male androphilia (male sexual attraction to adult males) evolved because androphilic males invest more in kin, thereby enhancing inclusive fitness. Increased kin-directed altruism has been repeatedly documented among a population of transgendered androphilic males, but never among androphilic males in other cultures who adopt gender identities as men. Thus, the kin selection hypothesis may be viable if male androphilia was expressed in the transgendered form in the ancestral past. Using the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS), (...)
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  21. Does volunteering foster physical health and longevity.Doug Oman - 2007 - In Stephen G. Post (ed.), Altruism and Health: Perspectives From Empirical Research. Oup Usa. pp. 15--32.
     
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  22. Deficient virtue in the Phaedo.Doug Reed - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (1):119-130.
    Plato seems to have been pessimistic about how most people stand with regard to virtue. However, unlike the Stoics, he did not conclude that most people are vicious. Rather, as we know from discussions across several dialogues, he countenanced decent ethical conditions that fall short of genuine virtue, which he limited to the philosopher. Despite Plato's obvious interest in this issue, commentators rarely follow his lead by investigating in detail such conditions in the dialogues. When scholars do investigate what kind (...)
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  23.  20
    Secularists or Modern Day Prophets?: Journalists' Ethics and the Judeo-Christian Tradition.Doug Underwood - 2001 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 16 (1):33-47.
    In this nationwide study of American and Canadian journalists, I found that their moral and ethical values are solidly connected to the Judeo-Christian tradition, even among those who do not claim to be religiously oriented. This study shows that religious values are imbedded deeply, if not always consciously, in the moral and ethical values of journalists and that journalists of varying religious orientations tend to endorse a core group of moral and ethical principles at the heart of the religious heritage (...)
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  24. Socrates, Philosophy, and Friendship in the 'Phaedo'.Doug Reed - 2020 - In Wisdom, Love, and Friendship in Ancient Greek Philosophy: Essays in Honor of Daniel Devereux. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter. pp. 175–190.
    In this paper I investigate Socrates as a friend in Plato's 'Phaedo'. I begin by setting out his friends' request for reassurance of how they will fare after Socrates dies. I argue that by structuring the discussion as he does, Socrates provides one final opportunity for his friends to prepare themselves for life without him, thus offering them the best kind of reassurance they could ask for.
     
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  25.  58
    Persons, Values, and Multiple Intelligences Theory.Doug Blomberg - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:19-26.
    For Howard Gardner, Multiple Intelligences Theory (MI) constitutes “a new understanding of human nature,” on a par with those proffered by Socrates and Freud. While the educational community in general has responded enthusiastically to MI, because it enables them to deal with students more holistically, MI embeds a significant dualism that is detrimental to truly holistic education. I will argue that: values are pervasive; intelligence requires the exercise of judgment, which no computational system can emulate; domains in which intelligence functions (...)
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  26.  57
    A Theory of Philosophical Enquiry: Unity and Plurality in Adam Smith's Thought.Doug Long - 2004 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 2 (1):1-21.
  27. Reporting on Drugs, Diets, Devices and Other Health Interventions.Kim Walsh-Childers - 2019 - In Ann Luce (ed.), Ethical reporting of sensitive topics. New York: Routledge, Taylor Francis Group.
     
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  28.  39
    Investigative Ordinary Language Philosophy.Doug Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - 2022 - Philosophical Investigations 45 (4):453-470.
    In this paper, we explicate the method of Investigative Ordinary Language Philosophy (IOLP). The term was coined by John Cook to describe the unique philosophical approach of Frank Ebersole. We argue that (i) IOLP is an overlooked yet valuable philosophical method grounded in our everyday experiences and concerns; and (ii) as such, Frank Ebersole is an important but neglected figure in the history of ordinary language philosophy.
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  29.  53
    Philosophy and Probability.Timothy Childers - 2013 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Probability is increasingly important for our understanding of the world. What is probability? How do we model it, and how do we use it? Timothy Childers presents a lively introduction to the foundations of probability and to philosophical issues it raises. He keeps technicalities to a minimum, and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject.
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  30.  60
    A Response to Daniel Holbrook's 'Descartes on Persons' and Doug Anderson's 'The Legacy oE Bowne's Empiricism'.Doug Anderson - 1992 - The Personalist Forum 8 (Supplement):15-20.
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  31.  4
    Between a Rock and a Hard Place.Doug Wallace - 1994 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 8 (4):34-35.
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  32.  19
    Pretending to care.Doug Hardman - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (7):506-509.
    On one hand, it is commonly accepted that clinicians should not deceive their patients, yet on the other there are many instances in which deception could be in a patient’s best interest. In this paper, I propose that this conflict is in part driven by a narrow conception of deception as contingent on belief. I argue that we cannot equate non-deceptive care solely with introducing or sustaining a patient’s true belief about their condition or treatment, because there are many instances (...)
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  33.  10
    Cultural Marxism, British cultural studies, and the reconstruction of education.Doug Kellner - 2023 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 55 (13):1423-1435.
    Many different versions of cultural studies have emerged in the past decades. While during its dramatic period of global expansion in the 1980s and 1990s, cultural studies was often identified with...
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  34.  57
    A case study of community-based participatory research ethics: The healthy public housing initiative.Doug Brugge & Alison Kole - 2003 - Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (4):485-501.
    We conducted and analyzed qualitative interviews with 12 persons working on the Healthy Public Housing Initiative in Boston, Massachusetts in 2001. Our goal was to generate ideas and themes related to the ethics of the community-based participatory research in which they were engaged. Specifically, we wanted to see if we found themes that differed from conventional research that is based on an individualistic ethics. There were clearly distinct ethical issues raised with respect to projects and individuals who engage in community-based (...)
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  35.  33
    Empiricism in the foundations of cognition.Timothy Childers, Juraj Hvorecký & Ondrej Majer - 2023 - AI and Society 38 (1):67-87.
    This paper traces the empiricist program from early debates between nativism and behaviorism within philosophy, through debates about early connectionist approaches within the cognitive sciences, and up to their recent iterations within the domain of deep learning. We demonstrate how current debates on the nature of cognition via deep network architecture echo some of the core issues from the Chomsky/Quine debate and investigate the strength of support offered by these various lines of research to the empiricist standpoint. Referencing literature from (...)
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  36.  49
    Protecting the navajo people through tribal regulation of research.Doug Brugge & Mariam Missaghian - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):491-507.
    This essay explores the process and issues related to community collaborative research that involves Native Americans generally, and specifically examines the Navajo Nation’s efforts to regulate research within its jurisdiction. Researchers need to account for both the experience of Native Americans and their own preconceptions about Native Americans when conducting research about Native Americans. The Navajo Nation institutionalized an approach to protecting members of the nation when it took over Institutional Review Board (IRB) responsibilities from the US Indian Health Service (...)
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  37. The Legalization of Drugs.Doug Husak & Peter de Marneffe - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the United States today, the use or possession of many drugs is a criminal offense. Can these criminal laws be justified? What are the best reasons to punish or not to punish drug users? These are the fundamental issues debated in this book by two prominent philosophers of law. Douglas Husak argues in favor of drug decriminalization, by clarifying the meaning of crucial terms, such as legalize, decriminalize, and drugs; and by identifying the standards by which alternative drug policies (...)
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  38.  32
    Close Reading, Epistemology, and Affect: Nabokov after Rorty.Doug Battersby - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):323-349.
  39.  47
    The implement of electronic portfolio in student assessment in art education.Doug Boughton & Shei-Chau Wang - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetic Education.
  40.  24
    The Language of First-Order Logic, including the Macintosh Program Tarski's World.Doug Goldson, Steve Reeves, Jon Barwise & John Etchemendy - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (175):272.
  41.  63
    Expressing Our Attitudes.Doug Kremm - 2018 - Analysis 78 (1):139-150.
    © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Analysis Trust. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: [email protected] volume collects nine of Mark Schroeder’s essays on expressivism, two of which are previously unpublished, along with a substantial introduction that helpfully ties them all together.1 The essays work very nicely as a collection. They are mutually illuminating, and together they make a ‘cumulative case’ for a particular conclusion – namely, that expressivist theories are best understood in (...)
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  42. Respectability and the Wild Beasts of the Philosophical Desert: The Heart of James's Varieties.Doug Anderson - 2003 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (1):1-13.
    This commentary was suggested to me in part by a colleague's remark that it would be nice if we could make William James's The Varieties of Religious Experience "respectable." The implication was that though there was something redeemable about the book, it somehow wasn't philosophically or scientifically proper. The remark awakened me to—or at least reminded me of—the fact that this has been a traditional take on James's text. As Julius Bixler points out, ridicule began soon after the book was (...)
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  43.  64
    Criteria of facial attractiveness in five populations.Doug Jones & Kim Hill - 1993 - Human Nature 4 (3):271-296.
    The theory of sexual selection suggests several possible explanations for the development of standards of physical attractiveness in humans. Asymmetry and departures from average proportions may be markers of the breakdown of developmental stability. Supernormal traits may present age- and sex-typical features in exaggerated form. Evidence from social psychology suggests that both average proportions and (in females) “neotenous” facial traits are indeed more attractive. Using facial photographs from three populations (United States, Brazil, Paraguayan Indians), rated by members of the same (...)
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  44.  55
    Overstraining Human Nature in the Nicomachean Ethics.Doug Reed - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):45-67.
    In this paper, I investigate Aristotle’s claim in 'Nicomachean Ethics' III.1 about situations that “overstrain human nature.” By setting out and answering several interpretative questions about such situations, I offer a comprehensive interpretation of this passage. I argue that in (at least some of) these cases, the agent voluntarily does something wrong, even though there is a right action available. Furthermore, I argue that Aristotle would think it is possible for a rare agent to perform the right action in (at (...)
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  45.  26
    Public reason in justifications of conscientious objection in health care.Doug McConnell & Robert F. Card - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (5):625-632.
    Current mainstream approaches to conscientious objection either uphold the standards of public health care by preventing objections or protect the consciences of health‐care professionals by accommodating objections. Public justification approaches are a compromise position that accommodate conscientious objections only when objectors can publicly justify the grounds of their objections. Public justification approaches require objectors and assessors to speak a common normative language and to this end it has been suggested that objectors should be required to cast their objection in terms (...)
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  46.  47
    Balancing the duty to treat with the duty to family in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.Doug McConnell - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (6):360-363.
    Healthcare systems around the world are struggling to maintain a sufficient workforce to provide adequate care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Staffing problems have been exacerbated by healthcare workers refusing to work out of concern for their families. I sketch a deontological framework for assessing when it is morally permissible for HCWs to abstain from work to protect their families from infection and when it is a dereliction of duty to patients. I argue that it is morally permissible for HCWs to (...)
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  47.  75
    Human kinship, from conceptual structure to grammar.Doug Jones - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (5):367-381.
    Research in anthropology has shown that kin terminologies have a complex combinatorial structure and vary systematically across cultures. This article argues that universals and variation in kin terminology result from the interaction of (1) an innate conceptual structure of kinship, homologous with conceptual structure in other domains, and (2) principles of optimal, “grammatical” communication active in language in general. Kin terms from two languages, English and Seneca, show how terminologies that look very different on the surface may result from variation (...)
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  48.  48
    A Strategy to Improve Priority Setting in Health Care Institutions.Doug Martin & Peter Singer - 2003 - Health Care Analysis 11 (1):59-68.
    Priority setting (also known as resource allocation or rationing) occurs at every level of every health system and is one of the most significant health care policy questions of the 21st century. Because it is so prevalent and context specific, improving priority setting in a health system entails improving it in the institutions that constitute the system. But, how should this be done? Normative approaches are necessary because they help identify key values that clarify policy choices, but insufficient because different (...)
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  49.  21
    Conscientious Objection in Health Care: Pinning down the Reasonability View.Doug McConnell - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (1):37-57.
    Robert Card’s “Reasonability View” is a significant contribution to the debate over the place of conscientious objection in health care. In his view, conscientious objections can only be accommodated if the grounds for the objection meet a reasonability standard. I identify inconsistencies in Card’s description of the reasonability standard and argue that each version he specifies is unsatisfactory. The criteria for reasonability that Card sets out most frequently have no clear underpinning principle and are too permissive of immoral objections. Card (...)
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  50.  15
    The Matrilocal Tribe.Doug Jones - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (1-2):177-200.
    This article integrates (1) research in the historical dynamics of state societies relating group solidarity and group expansion to cultural frontiers, (2) comparative research in anthropology relating matrilocality to a particular variety of internal politics and a particular form of warfare, and (3) interdisciplinary reconstructions of large-scale “demic expansions” and associated kinship systems in prehistory. The argument is that “metaethnic frontiers,” where very different cultures clash, are centers for the formation of larger, more enduring, and more militarily effective groups. In (...)
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