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Aristotle: Ethics* (1,466 | 669)
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  1. The Doing of Justice and the Priority of Acting From Virtue.Patricio A. Fernandez - forthcoming - Phronesis.
    Aristotle famously distinguishes between merely doing a virtuous action and acting in the way in which a virtuous person would. Against an interpretation prominent in recent scholarship, I argue that ‘acting virtuously,’ in the sense of exercising a virtue actually possessed, is prior to ‘virtuous action,’ understood generically. I propose that the latter notion is best understood as a derivative abstraction from the former, building upon a reading of a neglected distinction between per se and coincidentally just action in Nicomachean (...)
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  2. Beyond Hellenistic Epistemology: Arcesilaus and the Destruction of Stoic Metaphysics.Charles E. Snyder - 2021 - Bloomsbury Publishing.
    Charles E. Snyder considers the New Academy's attacks on Stoic epistemology through a critical re-assessment of the 3rd century philosopher, Arcesilaus of Pitane. Arguing that the standard epistemological framework used to study the ancient Academy ignores the metaphysical dimensions at stake in Arcesilaus's critique, Snyder explores new territory for the historiography of Stoic-Academic debates in the early Hellenistic period. Focusing on the dispute between the Old and New Academy, reveals the metaphysical dimensions of Arcesilaus' arguments as essential to grasping what (...)
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  3. Redepraxis als Lebenspraxis. Die diskursive Kultur der antiken Ethik.Lars Leeten - 2019 - Freiburg/München: Alber.
    Ancient ethics was an exercise of good life. This study examines how this is reflected in the forms of speech that ancient ethics developed. It is shown that, in antiquity, discursive practices were not considered neutral methods of ethical thinking but rather ways of life to be cultivated as ethical practices in their own right. This book describes central aspects of this ethical culture of speech from the times of the sophists and Socrates up to hellenistic philosophy.
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  4. Aidōs: The Psychology and Ethics of Honour and Shame in Ancient Greek Literature.Douglas Cairns - 1993 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Introduction; Aidos in Homer; From Hesiod to the Fifth Century; Aeschylus; Sophocles; Euripides; The Sophists, Plato, and Aristotle; References; Glossary; Index of Principal Passages; General Index.
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  5. How Lives Form Leaders: Plutarch’s Tripartite Theory of Leadership Education.Michael E. Promisel - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):277-302.
    Plutarch’s Parallel Lives was once considered a preeminent source of ethical and leadership instruction. But despite generations turning to the Lives for leadership education, we lack clarity concerning how the Lives cultivate leadership. In fact, Plutarch offers the key to this puzzle in a tripartite theory of leadership education evident throughout his corpus. Leaders should be educated through: 1) philosophical instruction, 2) experience in public life, or 3) literary synthesis – and, ideally, some combination of all three. Plutarch’s Lives, this (...)
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  6. 'Si no te conoces, bella entre las mujeres': el cuidado de sí mismo en Orígenes y los Capadocios.Francisco Bastitta-Harriet - 2017 - In Patrística, Biblia y Teología. Caminos de diálogo. Buenos Aires:
    Sabido es que Michel Foucault, en sus lecciones acerca de La hermenéutica del sujeto, postula que el ideal clásico del ´cuidado de sí mismo´ entra en crisis con el cristianismo de los siglos III y IV, dando lugar al precepto de la renuncia a uno mismo como vía hacia la salvación. El filósofo francés menciona como claro ejemplo de este viraje fundamental la preferencia por el celibato en lugar del matrimonio en el De virginitate de Gregorio de Nisa, uno de (...)
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  7. Review of Jost and Shiner, Eds. Eudaimonia and Well-Being. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2004 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 7:38.
    What is at stake in determining how to translate the central term of Greek ethical philosophy, that of eudaimonia? The volume Eudaimonia and Well-Being (a collection of ten papers presented at a conference at the University of Cincinnati in 1993) shows that English terms such as happiness, well-being, and flourishing can have significantly different connotations which complicate our understanding of the Greek term. The volume’s contributors work in both ancient Greek ethics and Anglophone contemporary moral philosophy, and although not all (...)
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  8. What is Philosophy as a Way of Life? Why Philosophy as a Way of Life?Stephen R. Grimm & Caleb Cohoe - 2021 - Wiley: European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):236-251.
    Despite a recent surge of interest in philosophy as a way of life, it is not clear what it might mean for philosophy to guide one's life, or how a “philosophical” way of life might differ from a life guided by religion, tradition, or some other source. We argue against John Cooper that spiritual exercises figure crucially in the idea of philosophy as a way of life—not just in the ancient world but also today, at least if the idea is (...)
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  9. Valerius Maximus on His Own Activity.D. Wardle - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (2):756-761.
    As he draws toward the conclusion of a lengthy string of Roman exempla on the topic of moderatio, a virtue highly regarded by the reigning Emperor Tiberius, Valerius introduces a brief discussion on the challenges he faces in producing the kind of account he wants to create. Unfortunately, for a rare passage in which Valerius speaks about his own work, the text is uncertain: various problems have been identified and different solutions have been proposed, but not, I will argue, ones (...)
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  10. Reconstructing Brutus’ De Virtute: Consolation and Antiochean Fundamentalism.Peter Osorio - 2020 - Phronesis 66 (1):52-83.
    Brutus’ De virtute, a lost work that had important but overlooked influence on Cicero’s ethical dialogues, is more dependent on Antiochus’ ethics than has been recognized. In reviewing the sources for De virtute, I arrive at a conception of Brutus’ work as a consolation written in a fundamentalist—rather than ecumenical—mode that focalizes its arguments and commonplaces from the perspective of Antiochus’ philosophical system. This conception is supported by the only other testimony for Brutus’ consolatory writing.
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  11. Overstraining Human Nature in the Nicomachean Ethics.Doug Reed - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):45-67.
    In this paper, I investigate Aristotle’s claim in 'Nicomachean Ethics' III.1 about situations that “overstrain human nature.” By setting out and answering several interpretative questions about such situations, I offer a comprehensive interpretation of this passage. I argue that in (at least some of) these cases, the agent voluntarily does something wrong, even though there is a right action available. Furthermore, I argue that Aristotle would think it is possible for a rare agent to perform the right action in (at (...)
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  12. The Humanism of Cicero.Friedrich Solmsen & H. A. K. Hunt - 1955 - American Journal of Philology 76 (4):430.
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  13. Kant's Canon, Garve's Cicero, and the Stoic Doctrine of the Highest Good.Corey Dyck - forthcoming - In Stefano Bacin & Oliver Sensen (eds.), Kant's Moral Philosophy in Context. Cambridge:
    The concept of the highest good is an important but hardly uncontroversial piece of Kant’s moral philosophy. In the considerable literature on the topic, challenges are raised concerning its apparently heteronomous role in moral motivation, whether there is a distinct duty to promote it, and more broadly whether it is ultimately to be construed as a theological or merely secular ideal. Yet comparatively little attention has been paid to the context of a doctrine that had enjoyed a place of prominence (...)
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  14. Complete Virtue and the Definition of Happiness in Aristotle.Xinkai Hu - 2020 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 15 (2):293-314.
    In this paper, I challenge the standard reading of complete virtue (ἀρετή τελεία) in those disputed passages of Nicomachean Ethics and Eudemian Ethics. I argue that, for Aristotle, complete virtue is neither (i) wisdom nor (ii) a whole set of all virtues. Rather, it is a term used by Aristotle to denote any virtue that is in its complete or perfect form. In light of this reading, I offer a pluralist interpretation of Aristotelian happiness. I argue that for Aristotle, the (...)
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  15. The Socratic Way of Life: Xenophon’s Memorabilia, Written by Thomas L. Pangle.Harold Tarrant - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):378-381.
  16. El llanto y la pólis.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2019 - Madrid: La Oficina de Arte y Ediciones.
    Partiendo de Homero, se emprende una lectura de ciertas tragedias de Sófocles y de Eurípides. Alcestis muere por la belleza; Medea se queda en el aire; la casa se ha corrompido y la pólis ha caído enferma. Para implantar el nuevo proyecto político y apostar con determinación por la igualdad ciudadana, la pólis debía contener el llanto y reprimir las lágrimas por los parientes muertos, lo cual exigía contener y reprimir a las mujeres. Este ensayo intenta comprender en qué sentido (...)
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  17. Roman Law and the Idea of Europe: Europe’s Legacy in the Modern World. Edited by Kaius Tuori and Heta Björklund. Pp. 288, London/NY, Bloomsbury Academic, 2019, £86.00. [REVIEW]James Campbell - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (2):365-366.
  18. Individuality and Hierarchy in Cicero’s De Officiis.Michael C. Hawley - 2020 - European Journal of Political Theory 19 (1):87-105.
    This essay explores a creative argument that Cicero offers to answer a fundamental question: how are we to judge among different ways of life? Is there a natural hierarchy of human types? In response to this problem, Cicero gives an account of a person’s possessing two natures. All of us participate in a general human nature, the characteristics of which provide us with certain universal duties and a natural moral hierarchy. But, we also each possess an individual nature, qualities that (...)
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  19. Defining Friendship in Cicero’s De Amicitia.Thornton C. Lockwood - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):409-426.
    Scholars have disagreed on whether Cicero’s De Amicitia is a philosophically serious or even coherent work. Such criticisms, I believe, can be met by an examination of the successive accounts of friendship that the character of Gaius Laelius provides in the dialogue. I argue that the dialogue offers three such accounts of friendship which taken together provide a comprehensive and coherent account of friendship. Further, I defend Cicero’s account against criticisms that Aulus Gellius had raised in the 2nd century CE (...)
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  20. The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Ethics, Edited by Christopher Bobonich. [REVIEW]David J. Riesbeck - 2019 - Polis 36 (2):359-366.
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  21. Exemplary Ethics in Ancient Rome by Rebecca Langlands.Rex Stem - 2019 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 112 (4):381-382.
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  22. The Value of Critical Knowledge, Ethics and Education: Philosophical History Bringing Epistemic and Critical Values to Values.Ignace Haaz - 2019 - Geneva, Switzerland: Globethics Publications.
    This book aims at six important conceptual tools developed by philosophers. The author develops each particular view in a chapter, hoping to constitute at the end a concise, interesting and easily readable whole. These concepts are: 1. Ethics and realism: elucidation of the distinction between understanding and explanation – the lighthouse type of normativity. 2. Leadership, antirealism and moral psychology – the lightning rod type of normativity. 3. Bright light on self-identity and positive reciprocity – the reciprocity type of normativity. (...)
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  23. Konstantinos Ch. Grollios: Κικέρων Καὶ Πλατωνικὴ Ἠθική. Pp. X+164. Athens: Privately Printed, 1960. Paper.Arthur W. H. Adkins - 1966 - The Classical Review 16 (1):119-119.
  24. Paolo Fedeli: M. Tulli Ciceronis De Officiis. Pp. 229. Rome: Mondadori, 1965. Paper, L. 3,000.R. G. M. Nisbet - 1967 - The Classical Review 17 (2):223-223.
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  25. Carlo di Spigno : Cicerone Etica e Politica. Antologia del “De Officiis”, con un saggio di Sergio Cotta Pp. xli + 118; 2 plates. Turin: Paravia, 1972. Paper, L. 1,900. [REVIEW]A. A. Long - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (1):157-157.
  26. Hans Armin Gärtner: Cicero und Panaitios: Beobachtungen zu Ciceros De Officiis. Pp. 79. Heidelberg: Carl Winter, 1974. Paper. [REVIEW]A. E. Douglas - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (2):283-283.
  27. Tragedy and Philosophy - Martha C. Nussbaum: The Fragility of Goodness. Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. Pp. Xviii + 544. Cambridge University Press, 1986. £35. [REVIEW]Malcolm Heath - 1987 - The Classical Review 37 (1):43-47.
  28. Emanuele Narducci: Modelli etici e società: un'idea di Cicerone. Pp. 279. Pisa: Giardini, 1989. Paper.J. G. F. Powell - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (1):236-236.
  29. M. T. Griffin, E. M. Atkins : Cicero, On Duties. Pp. Li + 189. Cambridge University Press, 1991. £19.50.Alan E. Douglas - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (2):445-445.
  30. J. G. F. Powell : Cicero: On Friendship and the Dream of Scipio . Edited with an Introduction, Translation and Commentary. Pp. Xi+176; 2 Figs. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1990. £32. [REVIEW]S. P. Oakley - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (2):445-446.
  31. Good Behaviour - C. Skidmore: Practical Ethics for Roman Gentlemen: The Work of Valerius Maximus. Pp Xvii + 142. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1996. £30. ISBN: 0-85989-477-0. [REVIEW]W. Bloomer - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):52-54.
  32. C. Horn: Antike Lebenskunst: Glück Und Moral von Sokrates Bis Zu den Neuplatonikern . Pp. 271. Munich: C. H. Beck, 1998. Paper, DM 24. ISBN: 3-406-42071-. [REVIEW]James Warren - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (1):334-334.
  33. Ancient Ethics.Eugenio Benitez - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (2):430-432.
  34. Roman Morality - Morgan Popular Morality in the Early Roman Empire. Pp. Xiv + 380, Figs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Cased, £55, US$99. ISBN: 978-0-521-87553-0. [REVIEW]Rebecca Langlands - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (1):237-239.
  35. Aristotle on the Heterogeneity of Pleasure.Matthew Strohl - 2018 - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History.
    In Nicomachean Ethics X.5, Aristotle gives a series of arguments for the claim that pleasures differ from one another in kind in accordance with the differences in kind among the activities they arise in connection with. I develop an interpretation of these arguments based on an interpretation of his theory of pleasure (which I have defended elsewhere) according to which pleasure is the perfection of perfect activity. In the course of developing this interpretation, I reconstruct Aristotle’s phenomenology of pleasure, arguing (...)
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  36. A Civic Alternative to Stoicism: The Ethics of Hellenistic Honorary Decrees.Benjamin Gray - 2018 - Classical Antiquity 37 (2):187-235.
    This article shows how the public inscriptions of Hellenistic poleis, especially decrees in honor of leading citizens, illuminate Greek ethical thinking, including wider debates about questions of central importance for Greek ethical philosophers. It does so by comparing decrees' rhetoric with the ethical language and doctrines of different ancient philosophical schools. Whereas some scholars identify ethical views comparable to Stoic ideas in Hellenistic decrees, this article argues that there are more significant overlaps, especially in decrees from Asia Minor dating to (...)
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  37. Lucretius on the Nature of Parental Love.Sean McConnell - 2018 - Antichthon 52:72-89.
  38. Disagreement and Reception. Peripatetics Responding to the Stoic Challenge.Jan Szaif - 2016 - In Ralph Hexter & Brenda Schildgen (eds.), Reading the Past Across Space and Time: Receptions and World Literature. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 121-147.
    Starting from an abstract sketch of scenarios for philosophical reception stimulated by disagreement and school rivalry, part one of this chapter highlights the case of an older, marginalized position that tries to reinsert itself into the debate through radical modernization of its terminology and argumentative strategies and thereby triggers various forms of orthodox response. Part two discusses examples for this scenario extracted from some of the remains of the Peripatetic ethical literature of the late Hellenistic era (Critolaus, Arius Didymus). Challenging (...)
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  39. Nature, Normativity, and Nomos in Antiphon, Fr. 44.David Riesbeck - 2011 - Phoenix 65 (3/4):268-287.
  40. Hellenistic Cosmopolitanism.Eric Brown - 2006 - In Mary Louise Gill & Pierre Pellegrin (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Oxford, UK: pp. 549-558.
    This chapter surveys the origins and development in Greek philosophy of the thought that living well requires living as a citizen of the world.
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  41. Virtus and the Roman Historiographers - Balmaceda Virtus Romana. Politics and Morality in the Roman Historians. Pp. XIV + 297, Ills. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2017. Cased, Us$45. Isbn: 978-1-46963512-5. [REVIEW]Jyri Vaahtera - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):514-516.
  42. Review of Christopher Bobonich (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Ethics[REVIEW]Noell Birondo - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):305-308.
    ‘Greek Ethics’, an undergraduate class taught by the British moral philosopher N. J. H. Dent, introduced this reviewer to the ethical philosophy of ancient Greece. The class had a modest purview—a sequence of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle—but it proved no less effective, in retrospect, than more synoptic classes for having taken this apparently limited and (for its students and academic level) appropriate focus. This excellent Companion will now serve any such class extremely well, allowing students a broader exposure than that (...)
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  43. Medicinanalogin i antik etik.Frits Gåvertsson - 2016 - Filosofisk Tidskrift 37 (2):35-42.
    Hellenistisk moralfilosofi utmärks av en syn på filosofisk verksamhet som är både praktisk och medkännande, en filosofi som var ämnad att hjälpa människor i deras lidande och med deras mest pressande bryderier. Man såg filosofin som ett verktyg för att handskas med problem vi människor mer eller mindre dagligen ställs inför såsom dödsångest, kärlek, och aggressioner. Utan att göra avkall på sanningssökande betraktade man filosofin som ämnad att hjälpa människor att leva blomstrande, lyckliga, liv. Denna moralfilosofiska ansats, eudaimonismen, kan sammanfattas (...)
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  44. ‘Review of R. Kamtekar (Ed.) (2012) Virtue and Happiness: Essays in Honour of Julia Annas. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Supplementary Volume’. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2013.7.37. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2013 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 7:37.
  45. ‘Review of K. Lampe (2015) The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life (Princeton University Press)’. Classical Journal 2015.09.02. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2015 - Classical Journal 9:02.
  46. ‘Review of A. Dressler (2016) Personification and the Feminine in Roman Philosophy (Cambridge University Press)’. Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2017.03.48. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2017 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 3:48.
  47. ‘Review of M. Bonazzi and S. Schorn (Eds.) (2016) Bios Philosophos: Philosophy in Ancient Greek Biography (Brepols)’. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2017 - Classical Journal 2017:09.05.
  48. Plutarch and Augustine on the Battlestar Galactica: Rediscovering Our Need for Virtue and Grace Through Modern Fiction.Mark J. Boone - 2013 - Imaginatio Et Ratio: A Journal for Theology and the Arts 2 (1).
    Two ancient sages show how even the most salacious fiction can be spiritually beneficial, for it shows our need for virtue and for grace. The first is the Roman philosopher Plutarch. Among ancient moral philosophers who were concerned with the effects of bad behavior in fiction, Plutarch distinguishes himself by showing how we can benefit morally from such stories. To do so we must approach them with a critical mind and from the right perspective; only then will we have the (...)
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  49. Eudaimonia and Pratical Rationality.Paul Bloomfield - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:265-286.
  50. Introduction.Rachana Kamtekar - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:1-12.
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