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  1. Teaching Native American Music with Story for Multicultural Ends.Andrea Boyea - forthcoming - Philosophy of Music Education Review.
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  2. Seeing and Inviting Participation in Autistic Interactions.Hanne De Jaegher - forthcoming - Transcultural Psychiatry.
    What does it take to see how autistic people participate in social interactions? And what does it take to support and invite more participation? Western medicine and cognitive science tend to think of autism mainly in terms of social and communicative deficits. But research shows that autistic people can interact with a skill and sophistication that are hard to see when starting from a deficit idea. Research also shows that not only autistic people, but also their non-autistic interaction partners can (...)
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  3. ""On" Americanizing" the American Indian.Horace M. Kallen - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  4. Postcolonial and Decolonial Feminisms.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - In The Oxford Handbook of Feminist Philosophy.
    In recent years postcolonial and decolonial feminisms have become increasingly salient in philosophy, yet they are often deployed as conceptual stand-ins for generalized feminist critiques of eurocentrism (without reference to the material contexts anti-colonial feminisms emanate from), or as a platform to re-center internal debates between dominant European theories/ists under the guise of being conceptually ‘decolonized’. By contrast, this article focuses on the specific contexts, issues and lifeworld concerns that ground anti-colonial feminisms and provides a brief survey of the literature. (...)
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  5. Authored Animals: Creature Tropes in Native American Fiction.Gerald Vizenor - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  6. Amerindian Heterotopia and the Resistance Against the Brazilian Ethnocide.Gustavo Ruiz da Silva - 2022 - Filosofia E Educação 3 (13):2725–2741.
    This article aims, starting from a contemporary problem (the destruction of indigenous lives and cultures in Brazil), to think about ethical questions – especially in what concerns other ways of constituting subjectivity and (dis)obedience. Thus, the indigenous obedience issue will be based on Pierre Clastres’ societies against the State, giving an extent to Viveiros de Castros and possible relationships with our western reality. The subjectivity issue, then, will be approached based on what was pointed out to us by Michel Foucault. (...)
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  7. Epistemic Oppression, Resistance, and Resurgence.Nora Berenstain, Kristie Dotson, Julieta Paredes, Elena Ruíz & Noenoe K. Silva - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory:1-32.
    Epistemologies have power. They have the power not only to transform worlds, but to create them. And the worlds that they create can be better or worse. For many people, the worlds they create are predictably and reliably deadly. Epistemologies can turn sacred land into ‘resources’ to be bought, sold, exploited, and exhausted. They can turn people into ‘labor’ in much the same way. They can not only disappear acts of violence but render them unnamable and unrecognizable within their conceptual (...)
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  8. Including the Iroquois Great Law of Peace in Introduction to Political Philosophy.Christopher Buckman - 2021 - Teaching Philosophy 44 (1):1-10.
    Introductory courses in political philosophy would benefit from the incorporation of material on the Iroquois Great Law of Peace, including the story of the foundation of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. Classroom study of this tradition will serve several purposes: introducing a valuable account of political phenomena such as negotiation, consensus, veto, and rational communication; contributing to the diversity of syllabi; tracing the influence of Iroquois law on Western political institutions; and comparing the Haudenosaunee story to early modern social contract theory, especially (...)
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  9. TRANSFIGURAÇÕES CATEGÓRICAS: A METAMORFOSE DA NATUREZA ENTRE LÉVI-STRAUSS, DESCOLA E VIVEIROS DE CASTRO.Gustavo Ruiz da Silva - 2021 - Occursus 2 (6):304-319.
    Este ensaio parte de um movimento de transmutação das noções ocidentais-modernas de Natureza e Cultura. Utilizando-se de uma base nietzscheana como fio condutor, primeiramente, introduzir-se-á a transformação da noção de Natureza dentro do estruturalismo de Lévi-Strauss, assim como suas variações. Após isto, será mostrado dois exemplos contemporâneos que completarão a crítica ao pensamento moderno europeu ao mostrar: as teorias de Philippe Descola, especialmente suas ideias sobre as diversas ontologias, e Viveiros de Castro, no concerne à questão do perspectivismo ameríndio.
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  10. Asian Philosophies and the Idea of Religion: Beyond Faith and Reason.Sonia Sikka & Ashwani Kumar Peetush (eds.) - 2021 - Oxon, UK: Routledge.
    With a focus on Asian traditions, this book examines varieties of thought and self-transformative practice that do not fit neatly on one side or another of the standard Western division between philosophy and religion. -/- It contains chapters by experts on Buddhist, Confucian, Taoist, Hindu and Jain philosophies, as well as ancient Greek philosophy and recent contemplative and spiritual movements. The volume also problematizes the notion of a Western philosophical canon distinguished by rationality in contrast to a religious Eastern "other". (...)
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  11. Philosophizing in Tongues: Cultivating Bilingualism, Biculturalism, and Biliteracy in an Introduction to Latin American Philosophy Course.Alexander V. Stehn - 2021 - Journal of Bilingual Education Research and Instruction 23 (1):12-32.
    This article describes my ongoing attempts to more successfully engage the full linguistic repertoires and cultural identities of undergraduate students at a “Hispanic Serving Institution” (HSI) in South Texas by teaching a bilingual Introduction to Latin American Philosophy course in the “Language, Philosophy, and Culture” area of Texas’ General Education Core Curriculum. By uncovering the diverse identities, worldviews, and languages of those who were historically excluded from the Eurocentric discipline of philosophy through the conquest and colonization of the Americas, Latin (...)
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  12. Entre outras oniromancias: dos gregos aos ameríndios.Gustavo Ruiz da Silva - 2020 - Paralaxe 1 (7):85-97.
    This article intends to navigate through three distinctive paths. The first of them being Ancient Greece, through Artemidorus, especially from his absorption by Foucault; The second being Ancient Rome, as worked by Paul Veyne in the Constantine’s analyses; and the third path is constituted from a series of ethnographic reports about the South American Amerindian communities. This theoretical trail will be taken to show other analytical possibilities for what is understoodas oneiromancy, that is, the analysis of dreams, that was not (...)
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  13. Book Review: Indigenizing Philosophy Through the Land: A Trickster Methodology for Decolonizing Environmental Ethics and Indigenous Futures by Brian Burkhart. [REVIEW]Joseph Len Miller - 2020 - APA Newsletter on Native American and Indigenous Philosophy 19 (2):7-11.
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  14. Decolonizing the Demarcation of the Ethical.Joseph Len Miller - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 177 (2):337-352.
    The question of what distinguishes moral problems from other problems is important to the study of the evolution and functioning of morality. Many researchers concerned with this topic have assumed, either implicitly or explicitly, that all moral problems are problems of cooperation. This assumption offers a response to the moral demarcation problem by identifying a necessary condition of moral problems. Characterizing moral problems as problems of cooperation is a popular response to this issue – especially among researchers empirically studying the (...)
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  15. Reconstructing Locality Through Marronage.Pedro Lebrón Ortiz - 2020 - American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Native American and Indigenous Philosophy 20 (1):3-11.
    This text intends on putting what may be called a philosophy of marronage1 in conversation with Indigenous thought, particularly by engaging with the thought of Cherokee Nation philosopher Brian Burkhart from his essay “Locality is a Metaphysical Fact.”2 While the topic is treated in detail in Burkhart’s Indigenizing Philosophy through the Land (2019), my engagement with that specific text will be reserved for a separate project. What is of interest to me here is Burkhart’s elaboration of the concept of locality, (...)
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  16. Broadening Space Horizons: Native American Girls in Space.Czarina Salido - 2020 - National Space Society 32 (Summer 202o):56 - 57.
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  17. The Gods of Indian Country: Religion and the Struggle for the American West. By Jennifer Graber. Pp. Xxiv, 282, NY, Oxford University Press, 2018, £23.49. [REVIEW]Peter Admirand - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (6):931-932.
  18. Indigenizing Philosophy Through the Land: A Trickster Methodology for Decolonizing Environmental Ethics and Indigenous Futures.Brian Burkhart - 2019 - East Lansing: Michigan State University Press.
    Land is key to the operations of coloniality, but the power of the land is also the key anticolonial force that grounds Indigenous liberation. This work is an attempt to articulate the nature of land as a material, conceptual, and ontological foundation for Indigenous ways of knowing, being, and valuing. As a foundation of valuing, land forms the framework for a conceptualization of Indigenous environmental ethics as an anticolonial force for sovereign Indigenous futures. This text is an important contribution in (...)
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  19. Entrevista: Casal Clastres, com Renato Sztutman.Gustavo Ruiz da Silva - 2019 - Alabastro 1 (12):6-15.
    Esta entrevista feita com Renato Sztutman, professor-doutor do Departamento de Antropologia Social da Universidade de São Paulo, circunda essencialmente a reflexão de Pierre Clastres, etnólogo francês que desenvolveu pesquisas acerca do pensamento político dos povos ameríndios da América do Sul. Passar-se-á por outros autores a isto relacionados, como a esposa, também antropóloga, do escritor supracitado e filósofos europeus que ajudaram a edificar a análise das sociedades contra-o-Estado.
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  20. Different Ways of Seeing ‘Savagery’: Two Nordic Travellers in 18th-Century North America.Gunlög Fur - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (4):43-62.
    Andreas Hesselius and Pehr Kalm both spent time in eastern North America during the first half of the 18th century. Both came with an ardent desire to observe and learn about the natural environment and inhabitants of the region. Both produced writings, in the form of journals that have proved immensely useful to subsequent scholars. Yet their writings also display differences that illuminate the epistemological and sociological underpinnings of their observations, and which had consequences for their encounters with foreign environments. (...)
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  21. The Gift of Kwe: A Present of Radical Resurgence. [REVIEW]Court Lewis - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):64-66.
    Kobade teaches that we must recognize all individuals as links in a familial/community chain from ancestors, to the present, and to future generations. With the recognition of kobade, individuals are then called to develop kwe—knowledge of one’s self that is theoretically anchored to and generated through one’s particular ancestral and lived experience. Kwe is a deep personal knowledge that is produced by combining the past with the present through everyday actions. It creates an attitude and process of engagement with the (...)
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  22. Etemeyaske Vpokat (Living Together Peacefully): How the Muscogee Concept of Harmony Can Provide a Structure to Morality.Joseph Len Miller - 2019 - In Colin Marshall (ed.), Comparative Metaethics: Neglected Perspectives on the Foundations of Morality. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 81-101.
    Drawing primarily from the cultural traditions and beliefs of the Muscogee peoples, I will provide an account of how harmony can play a foundational role in providing a structure to morality. In the process of providing this account, I will begin (§2) by defining two key Muscogee concepts: ‘energy’ (§2.1) and ‘harmony’ (§2.2). I will also explain how the relationship between these two concepts can provide a structure for morality. Then I will explain the conditions that make promoting harmony a (...)
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  23. The Structure of Dispossession in Settler México.Elena Ruíz - 2019 - Journal of World Philosophies 1 (4):121-155.
  24. American Indian Thought: Philosophical Essays Ed. By Anne Waters. [REVIEW]Joshua Hall - 2018 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 54 (2):280-293.
    American Indian Thought is a contemporary collection of twenty-two essays written by Indigenous persons with Western philosophical training, all attempting to formulate, and/or contribute to a sub-discipline of, a Native American Philosophy. The contributors come from diverse tribal, educational, philosophical, methodological, etc., backgrounds, and there is some tension among aspects of the collection, but what is more striking is the harmony and the singularity of the collection’s intent. Part of this singularity may derive from the solidarity among its authors. In (...)
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  25. Decolonising Science in Canada: A Work in Progress.Jeff Kochan - 2018 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 7 (11):42-47.
    This paper briefly highlights a small part of the work being done by Indigenous groups in Canada to integrate science into their ways of knowing and living with nature. Special attention is given to a recent attempt by Mi'kmaw educators in Unama'ki (Cape Breton, Nova Scotia) to overcome suspicion of science among their youth by establishing an 'Integrative Science' (Toqwa'tu'kl Kjijitaqnn, or 'bringing our knowledges together') degree programme at Cape Breton University. The goal was to combine Indigenous and scientific knowledges (...)
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  26. On What There 'Is': Aristotle and the Aztecs on Being and Existence.Lynn Sebastian Purcell - 2018 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 18 (1):11-23.
    A curious feature of Aztec philosophy is that the basic metaphysical question of the “Western” tradition cannot be formulated in their language, in Nahuatl. This did not, however, prevent the Aztecs from developing an account of 'reality', or whatever it is that might exist. The article is the first of its kind to compare the work of Aristotle on ousia (being) and the Aztecs on teotl and ometeotl. Through this analysis, it suggests that both of the Nahuatl terms are fundamental (...)
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  27. Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Renewal and U.S. Settler Colonialism.Kyle Powys Whyte - 2016 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. London: Routledge. pp. 354-365.
    Indigenous peoples often embrace different versions of the concept of food sovereignty. Yet some of these concepts are seemingly based on impossible ideals of food self-sufficiency. I will suggest in this essay that for at least some North American Indigenous peoples, food sovereignty movements are not based on such ideals, even though they invoke concepts of cultural revitalization and political sovereignty. Instead, food sovereignty is a strategy of Indigenous resurgence that negotiates structures of settler colonialism that erase the ecological value (...)
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  28. Tribal Water Rights: Exploring Dam Construction in Indian Country.Jerilyn Church, Chinyere O. Ekechi, Aila Hoss & Anika Jade Larson - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (S1):60-63.
    The environment, particularly, land and water, play a powerful role in sustaining and supporting American Indian and Alaska Native communities in the United States. Not only is water essential to life and considered — by some Tribes — a sacred food in and of itself, but environmental water resources are necessary to maintain habitat for hunting and fishing. Many American Indian and Alaska Native communities incorporate locally caught traditional subsistence foods into their diets, and the loss of access to subsistence (...)
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  29. Objective Styles in Northern Field Science.Jeff Kochan - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 52:1-12.
    Social studies of science have often treated natural field sites as extensions of the laboratory. But this overlooks the unique specificities of field sites. While lab sites are usually private spaces with carefully controlled borders, field sites are more typically public spaces with fluid boundaries and diverse inhabitants. Field scientists must therefore often adapt their work to the demands and interests of local agents. I propose to address the difference between lab and field in sociological terms, as a difference in (...)
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  30. Ethics and Community Involvement in Syntheses Concerning American Indian, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian Health: A Systematic Review.Matthew O. Gribble & Deana M. Around Him - 2014 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 5 (2):1-24.
  31. Justice, Diversity, and Dialogue: Rawlsian Multiculturalism.Ashwani Kumar Peetush - 2014 - In S. Sikka & L. Beaman (eds.), Multiculturalism and Religious Identity: Canada and India. Montreal, QC, Canada: pp. 153-168.
    In this chapter, I argue that John Rawls’ later work presents one of the most fruitful liberal frameworks from which to approach global cultural diversity. In his Law of Peoples (1999), the normative architecture Rawls provides is much more open to an intercultural/religious dialogue with various non-Western communities, such as the First Nations, than are other liberal approaches. Surprisingly, this has gone unnoticed in the literature on multiculturalism. At the same time, Rawls’ framework is not problem free. Here, I am (...)
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  32. Variation in Height and Bmi of Adult Indians.Suparna Som, Stanley Ulijaszek, Manoranjan Pal, Susmita Bharati & Premananda Bharati - 2014 - Journal of Biosocial Science 46 (1):47-65.
    SummaryIt is well known that height and weight are interrelated, and that both are related to socioeconomic variables. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of socioeconomic variables on the heights and weights of different groups of people, formed according to different levels of heights and weights, and to see whether there are sex differences in the variations in heights and weights. Data for adults aged 15–49 years were taken from the India National Family Health Survey-3 and (...)
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  33. We Are Still Here: A Photographic History of the American Indian Movement.Dick Bancroft, Laura Waterman Wittstock & Rigoberto Menchu Tum - 2013 - Borealis Books.
    The American Indian Movement, founded in 1968 in Minneapolis, burst into that turbulent time with passion, anger, and radical acts of resistance. Spurred by the Civil Rights movement, Native people began to protest the decades--centuries--of corruption, racism, and abuse they had endured. They argued for political, social, and cultural change, and they got attention. The photographs of activist Dick Bancroft, a key documentarian of AIM, provide a stunningly intimate view of this major piece of American history from 1970 to 1981. (...)
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  34. Shadow Nations: Tribal Sovereignty and the Limits of Legal Pluralism.Bruce Duthu - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    In order to counter the steady erosion of tribal powers of self-government, this book argues for redirecting the trajectory of tribal-federal relations to better reflect the formative ethos of legal pluralism that operated in the nation's earliest years.
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  35. A Compass for Valuation: Peircean Realism in Alain Locke's Functional Theory of Value.Greg Moses - 2013 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (4):402-424.
    When Alain Locke developed a philosophy of valuation that he termed “functional relativism,” he contrasted his position to “value realism,” apparently because he wanted to keep valuations free from being bound to status quo existence. This article considers Locke's philosophy of valuation in relation to the “realism” of Charles S. Peirce in order to show that there is an approach to realism that answers to requirements of dynamic, evolutionary growth and creativity. The argument begins by placing Locke's cardinal values onto (...)
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  36. Commentary:“Growing Up Indian”: Childhood and the Survival of Nations.Anthony Fc Wallace - 2013 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 41 (4):337-340.
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  37. Ancient Traditions, Modern Constructions: Innovation, Continuity, and Spirituality on the Powwow Trail.Kelley Dennis F. - 2012 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (33):107-136.
    In contemporary Indian Country, the majority of people who identify as “Indian” fall into the “urban” category: away from traditional lands and communities, in cities and towns wherein the opportunities to live one’s identity as Native can be restricted, and even more so for American Indian religious practice and activity. This article will explore a possible theoretical model for discussing the religious nature of urban Indians, using aspects of the contemporary powwow as exemplary, and suggest ways in which the discourse (...)
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  38. New Social Learning From Two Spirit Native Americans. Mayo & Mala Sheppard - 2012 - Journal of Social Studies Research 36 (3):263-282.
    In this article, the authors highlight connections between research on Two Spirit Native Americans and standard social studies curriculum. Two Spirit is a Pan-Indian term describing Native Americans who believe they embody both masculine and feminine characteristics/traits in one physical body. Findingsfrom this research expand the field's conception of multiple perspectives and diversity, while creating opportunities for nuanced understandings of genderexpression and gender that go beyond the male/female dichotomy currently accepted as the norm. The authors utilize historical research and a (...)
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  39. Between Native American and Continental Philosophy: A Comparative Approach to Narrative and the Emergence of Responsible Selves.Troy Richardson - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (6):663-674.
    This essay explores some of the affinities between current theories of North American Indigenous trickster narratives and continental philosophy where they are both concerned with the question of responsibility in subject formations. Taking up the work of Judith Butler, Franz Kafka and Gerald Vizenor, the author works to show how both continental and Indigenous intellectual traditions work against any assumed stability for the ‘I’ in the narration of the self, yet toward responsible relationality. Such affinities, however, emerge from differing socio‐cultural (...)
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  40. Why Have You Come Here? The Jesuits and the First Evangelization of Native America. By Nicholas P. Cushner.Thomas M. McCoog - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (5):903-904.
  41. Unmaking History: Seth's Europe's Indians.Mindy Peden - 2011 - Theory and Event 14 (3).
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  42. Uncomfortable Comparisons: The Canadian Truth And Reconciliation Commission In International Context.Matt James - 2010 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 5 (2):23-35.
    The Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools is a novel foray into a genre previously associated with so-called “transitional” democracies from the post- Communist world and the global South. This basic fact notwithstanding, a systematic comparison with the broader universe of truth commission-hosting countries reveals that the circumstances surrounding the Canadian TRC are not entirely novel. This article develops this argument by distilling from the transitional justice literature several bases of comparison designed to explain how a truth (...)
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  43. The Dance of Person and Place: One Interpretation of American Indian Philosophy.Thomas M. Norton-Smith - 2010 - State University of New York Press.
    Common themes in American Indian philosophy -- First introductions -- Common themes : a first look -- Constructing an actual American Indian world -- NelsonGoodman's constructivism -- Setting the stage -- Fact, fiction, and feeders -- Ontological pluralism -- True versions and well-made worlds -- Nonlinguistic versions and the advancement of understanding -- True versions and cultural bias -- Constructive realism : variations on a theme by Goodman -- True versions and cultural bias -- An American Indian well-made actual world (...)
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  44. Global Knowledge on the Move: Itineraries, Amerindian Narratives, and Deep Histories of Science.Neil Safier - 2010 - Isis 101 (1):133-145.
    Since Bruno Latour's discussion of a Sakhalin island map used by La Pérouse as part of a global network of “immutable mobiles,” the commensurability of European and non-European knowledge has become an important issue for historians of science. But recent studies have challenged these dichotomous categories as reductive and inadequate for understanding the fluid nature of identities, their relational origins, and their historically constituted character. Itineraries of knowledge transfer, traced in the wake of objects and individuals, offer a powerful heuristic (...)
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  45. The Ethics Of Reconciling: Learning From Canada’s Truth And Reconciliation Commission.Emily Snyder - 2010 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 5 (2):36-48.
    In 2008, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) was initiated to address the historical and contemporary injustices and impacts of Indian Residential Schools. Of the many goals of the TRC, I focus on reconciliation and how the TRC aims to promote this through public education and engagement. To explore this, I consider two questions: 1) who does the TRC include in the process of reconciliation? And 2) how might I, as someone who is not Indigenous (specifically, as someone (...)
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  46. Peripheral Vision: Science and Creole Patriotism in Eighteenth-Century Spanish America.Helen Cowie - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (3):143-155.
    This article examines the study of natural history on the imperial periphery in late colonial Spanish America. It considers the problems that afflicted peripheral naturalists—lack of books, instruments, scholarly companionship, and skilled technicians. It discusses how these deprivations impacted upon their self-confidence and credibility as men of science and it examines the strategies adopted by peripheral naturalists to boost their scientific credibility. The article argues that Spanish American savants, deprived of the most up-to-date books and sophisticated instruments, emphasised instead their (...)
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  47. Survey Article: The Justification of Minority Language Rights.Alan Patten - 2009 - Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (1):102-128.
  48. Indigenizing Human Rights: First Nations, Self-Determination, and Cultural Identity.Ashwani Kumar Peetush - 2009 - In Priti Singh (ed.), Indigenous Identity and Activism. New Delhi, Delhi, India: Shipra Press. pp. 190-204.
    In this paper I argue that with regard to Indigeneity, there is a profound irony at work in the purportedly emancipatory power of human rights discourse. On the one hand, it is clear that this discourse has made, and continues to make, a significant contribution in supporting Indigenous peoples to articulate their claims for cultural recognition and struggle for freedom and self-rule. On the other hand, I contend that this discourse has a detrimental effect: a Trojan horse of sorts. The (...)
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  49. Scientific Discourse in the Academy: A Case Study of an American Indian Undergraduate.Carol B. Brandt - 2008 - Science Education 92 (5):825-847.
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  50. ‘Killing’ the True Story of First Nations: The Ethics of Constructing a Culture Apart.Romayne Smith Fullerton & Maggie Jones Patterson - 2008 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (3):201 – 218.
    Cases taken from the coverage of Canadian/Ipperwash and American/Makah disputes over tribal land and sea claims point up that subtle but entrenched racist assumptions, conclusions, and myths of native culture persist despite attempts by newsrooms to be more culturally sensitive. Traditional journalism standards of practice and ethical approaches must be expanded to consider more of the subtleties of media's problematic representations of aboriginal peoples—as a culture, a culture apart, and a cultural construct. The ethics of continental philosopher Emmanuel Levinas, the (...)
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