Results for 'Clinical ethics'

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  1. Clinical Ethics a Practical Approach to Ethical Decisions in Clinical Medicine.Albert R. Jonsen, Mark Siegler & William J. Winslade - 1982 - McGraw-Hill Companies.
    Clinical Ethics introduces the four-topics method of approaching ethical problems (i.e., medical indications, patient preferences, quality of life, and contextual features). Each of the four chapters represents one of the topics. In each chapter, the authors discuss cases and provide comments and recommendations. The four-topics method is an organizational process by which clinicians can begin to understand the complexities involved in ethical cases and can proceed to find a solution for each case.
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  2.  9
    Clinical Ethics Revisited.D. Pellegrino Edmund, A. Singer Peter & Siegler Mark - 2001 - BMC Medical Ethics 2 (1):1.
    A decade ago, we reviewed the field of clinical ethics; assessed its progress in research, education, and ethics committees and consultation; and made predictions about the future of the field. In this article, we revisit clinical ethics to examine our earlier observations, highlight key developments, and discuss remaining challenges for clinical ethics, including the need to develop a global perspective on clinical ethics problems.
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  3.  21
    Clinical Ethics Support for Healthcare Personnel: An Integrative Literature Review.Dara Rasoal, Kirsti Skovdahl, Mervyn Gifford & Annica Kihlgren - 2017 - HEC Forum 29 (4):313-346.
    This study describes which clinical ethics approaches are available to support healthcare personnel in clinical practice in terms of their construction, functions and goals. Healthcare personnel frequently face ethically difficult situations in the course of their work and these issues cover a wide range of areas from prenatal care to end-of-life care. Although various forms of clinical ethics support have been developed, to our knowledge there is a lack of review studies describing which ethics (...)
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  4.  22
    The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project: Preliminary Notes From a Pilot Project to Establish Quality Measures for Ethics Consultation. [REVIEW]Deborah M. Swiderski, Katharine M. Ettinger, Mayris Webber & Nancy N. Dubler - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):65-72.
    The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project (CECP) was intiated in 2007 in response to the lack of uniform standards for both the training of clinical ethics consultants, and for evaluating their work as consultants. CECP participants, all practicing clinical ethics consultants, met monthly to apply a standard evaluation instrument, the QI tool , to their consultation notes. This paper describes, from a qualitative perspective, how participants grappled with applying standards to their work. Although the process (...)
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  5.  34
    Clinical Ethics Committees in Norway: What Do They Do, and Does It Make a Difference?Reidun Førde & Reidar Pedersen - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):389-395.
    The first clinical ethics committees in Norway were established in 1996. This started as an initiative from hospital clinicians, the Norwegian Medical Association, and health authorities and politicians. Norwegian hospitals are, by and large, publicly funded through taxation, and all inpatient treatment is free of charge. Today, all the 23 hospital trusts have established at least one committee. Center for Medical Ethics , University of Oslo, receives an annual amount of US$335,000 from the Ministry of Health and (...)
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  6.  22
    Clinical Ethics Consultations in the Opinion of Polish Physicians.Marek Czarkowski, Joanna Różyńska, Bartosz Maćkiewicz & Jakub Zawiła-Niedźwiecki - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (3):499-509.
    Clinical Ethics Consultations are an important tool for physicians in solving difficult cases. They are extremely common in North America and to a lesser extent also present in Europe. However, there is little data on this practice in Poland. We present results of a survey of 521 physicians practising in Poland concerning their opinion on CECs and related practices. We analysed the data looking at such issues as CECs’ perceived availability, use of CECs, and perceived usefulness of such (...)
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  7.  29
    Clinical Ethics Consultants Are Not “Ethics” Experts—But They Do Have Expertise.Lisa M. Rasmussen - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (4):384-400.
    The attempt to critique the profession of clinical ethics consultation by establishing the impossibility of ethics expertise has been a red herring. Decisions made in clinical ethics cases are almost never based purely on moral judgments. Instead, they are all-things-considered judgments that involve determining how to balance other values as well. A standard of justified decision-making in this context would enable us to identify experts who could achieve these standards more often than others, and thus (...)
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  8.  7
    Clinical Ethics Consultation in the Transition Countries of Central and Eastern Europe.Marcin Orzechowski, Maximilian Schochow & Florian Steger - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (2):833-850.
    Since 1989, clinical ethics consultation in form of hospital ethics committees was established in most of the transition countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Up to now, the similarities and differences between HECs in Central and Eastern Europe and their counterparts in the U.S. and Western Europe have not been determined. Through search in literature databases, we have identified studies that document the implementation of clinical ethics consultation in Central and Eastern Europe. These studies have (...)
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  9.  15
    Evaluating Clinical Ethics Support: A Participatory Approach.Suzanne Metselaar, Guy Widdershoven, Rouven Porz & Bert Molewijk - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):258-266.
    The current process towards formalization within evaluation research, in particular the use of pre-set standards and the focus on predefined outcomes, implies a shift of ownership from the people who are actually involved in real clinical ethics support services in a specific context to external stakeholders who increasingly gain a say in what ‘good CESS’ should look like. The question is whether this does justice to the insights and needs of those who are directly involved in actual CESS (...)
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  10.  20
    Does Clinical Ethics Need a Land Ethic?Alistair Wardrope - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (4):531-543.
    A clinical ethics fit for the Anthropocene—our current geological era in which human activity is the primary determinant of environmental change—needs to incorporate environmental ethics to be fit for clinical practice. Conservationist Aldo Leopold’s essay ‘The Land Ethic’ is probably the most widely-cited source in environmental philosophy; but Leopold’s work, and environmental ethics generally, has made little impression on clinical ethics. The Land Ethic holds that “A thing is right when it tends to (...)
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  11.  43
    Evaluating Clinical Ethics Consultation: A European Perspective.Margarete Pfäfflin, Klaus Kobert & Stella Reiter-Theil - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (4):406.
    This paper focuses on the topic of evaluation of clinical ethics consultation. The concept of evaluation seems to contain an internal tension: On the one hand, evaluation is seen as distorting the conceptual and normative content of the case under scrutiny and, on the other, the evaluative act is the most important use of judgment and an inescapable part of everyday life. As such, we maintain that evaluation is essential.
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  12.  30
    Clinical Ethics Consultation in Europe: A Comparative and Ethical Review of the Role of Patients.Véronique Fournier, Eirini Rari, Reidun Førde, Gerald Neitzke, Renzo Pegoraro & Ainsley J. Newson - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (3):131-138.
    Clinical ethics has developed significantly in Europe over the past 15 years and remains an evolving process. While sharing our experiences in different European settings, we were surprised to discover marked differences in our practice, especially regarding the position and role of patients. In this paper, we describe these differences, such as patient access to and participation or representation in ethics consults. We propose reasons to explain these differences, hypothesizing that they relate to the historic and sociocultural (...)
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  13.  25
    Clinicians' Evaluation of Clinical Ethics Consultations in Norway: A Qualitative Study. [REVIEW]Reidun Førde, Reidar Pedersen & Victoria Akre - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):17-25.
    Clinical ethics committees have existed in Norway since 1996. By now all hospital trusts have one. An evaluation of these committees’ work was started in 2004. This paper presents results from an interview study of eight clinicians who evaluated six committees’ deliberations on 10 clinical cases. The study indicates that the clinicians found the clinical ethics consultations useful and worth while doing. However, a systematic approach to case consultations is vital. Procedures and mandate of the (...)
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  14.  9
    Clinical Ethics Needs Assessment: Adapting Clinical Ethics to a Population Health Program.Etan Kuperberg - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (1):21-32.
    The clinical encounter between providers and patients is insufficient: most factors influencing health outcomes occur outside the clinic. Community Health Needs Assessments address this insufficiency via collaboration between hospitals and the communities they serve to address systemic sociological-economic variables impacting health outcomes. Considering this, why are Health Care Ethics Consultation services limited to the clinical setting? We can cultivate better ethics outcomes by addressing systemic sociological-economic factors that cause recurring ethics issues in the hospital. In (...)
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  15.  19
    Credentialing the Clinical Ethics Consultant: An Academic Medical Center Affirms Professionalism and Practice.Cathleen A. Acres, Kenneth Prager, George E. Hardart & Joseph J. Fins - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (2):156.
    In response to national trends calling for increasing accountability and an emerging dialogue within bioethics, we describe an effort to credential clinical ethicists at a major academic medical center. This effort is placed within the historical context of prior calls for credentialing and certification and efforts currently underway within organized bioethics to engage this issue. The specific details, and conceptual rationale, behind the New York-Presbyterian Hospital’s graduated credentialing plan are shared as is their evolution and ratification within the context (...)
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  16.  64
    Clinical Ethics, Information, and Communication: Review of 31 Cases From a Clinical Ethics Committee. [REVIEW]R. Forde - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):73-77.
    Objectives: To summarise the types of case brought to the Clinical Ethics Committee of the National Hospital of Norway from 1996 to 2002 and to describe and discuss to what extent issues of information/communication have been involved in the ethical problems. Design: Systematic review of case reports. Findings: Of the 31 case discussions, (20 prospective, 11 retrospective), 19 cases concerned treatment of children. Twenty cases concerned ethical problems related to withholding/withdrawing of treatment. In 25 cases aspects of information/communication (...)
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  17.  12
    The Clinical Ethics Consultant: What Role is There for Religious Beliefs?J. Clint Parker - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (2):85-89.
    Religions often operate as comprehensive worldviews, attempting to answer the deepest existential questions that human beings can ask: Who am I? Where do I come from? Where am I going after I die? How should I live? Often ethical systems are embedded and justified within these broader narratives. Inevitably, the clinical ethics consultant will encounter and engage with religiously based ethical systems. In this issue, the authors reflect seriously and deeply on the implications of such engagement.
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  18.  37
    The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project: Preliminary Notes From a Pilot Project to Establish Quality Measures for Ethics Consultation.M. Swiderski Deborah, M. Ettinger Katharine, Nancy Mayris Webber & N. Dubler - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):65-72.
    The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project (CECP) was intiated in 2007 in response to the lack of uniform standards for both the training of clinical ethics consultants, and for evaluating their work as consultants. CECP participants, all practicing clinical ethics consultants, met monthly to apply a standard evaluation instrument, the “QI tool”, to their consultation notes. This paper describes, from a qualitative perspective, how participants grappled with applying standards to their work. Although the process was (...)
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  19.  50
    Barriers and Challenges in Clinical Ethics Consultations: The Experiences of Nine Clinical Ethics Committees: Country Reports.Reidar Pedersen - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (8):460-469.
    Clinical ethics committees have recently been established in nearly all Norwegian hospital trusts. One important task for these committees is clinical ethics consultations. This qualitative study explores significant barriers confronting the ethics committees in providing such consultation services. The interviews with the committees indicate that there is a substantial need for clinical ethics support services and, in general, the committee members expressed a great deal of enthusiasm for the committee work. They also reported, (...)
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  20.  4
    Clinical Ethics Committees in Africa: Lost in the Shadow of RECs/IRBs?Keymanthri Moodley, Siti Mukaumbya Kabanda, Leza Soldaat, Anita Kleinsmidt, Adetayo Emmanuel Obasa & Sharon Kling - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-10.
    Background Clinical Ethics Committees are well established at healthcare institutions in resource-rich countries. However, there is limited information on established CECs in resource poor countries, especially in Africa. This study aimed to establish baseline data regarding existing formal CECs in Africa to raise awareness of and to encourage the establishment of CECs or Clinical Ethics Consultation Services on the continent. Methods A descriptive study was undertaken using an online questionnaire via SunSurveys to survey healthcare professionals and (...)
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  21.  20
    Evaluating Clinical Ethics Support in Mental Healthcare: A Systematic Literature Review.M. H. Hem, R. Pedersen, R. Norvoll & B. Molewijk - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (4):452-466.
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  22.  4
    Clinical Ethics Case Consultation in a University Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care: A Descriptive Evaluation of Consultation Protocols.Michel Noutsias, Daniel Sedding, Jochen Dutzmann, Henning Rosenau, Kim P. Linoh, Nicolas Heirich, Stephan Nadolny, Jan Schildmann & Andre Nowak - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundClinical ethics case consultations provide a structured approach in situations of ethical uncertainty or conflicts. There have been increasing calls in recent years to assess the quality of CECCs by means of empirical research. This study provides detailed data of a descriptive quantitative and qualitative evaluation of a CECC service in a department of cardiology and intensive care at a German university hospital.MethodsSemi-structured document analysis of CECCs was conducted in the period of November 1, 2018, to May 31, 2020. (...)
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  23.  72
    Clinical Ethics Revisited.Peter Singer, Edmund Pellegrino & Mark Siegler - 2001 - BMC Medical Ethics 2 (1):1-8.
    A decade ago, we reviewed the field of clinical ethics; assessed its progress in research, education, and ethics committees and consultation; and made predictions about the future of the field. In this article, we revisit clinical ethics to examine our earlier observations, highlight key developments, and discuss remaining challenges for clinical ethics, including the need to develop a global perspective on clinical ethics problems.
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  24.  22
    Clinical Ethical Conflicts of Nurses and Physicians.Alice Gaudine, Sandra M. LeFort, Marianne Lamb & Linda Thorne - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (1):9-19.
    Much of the literature on clinical ethical conflict has been specific to a specialty area or a particular patient group, as well as to a single profession. This study identifies themes of hospital nurses’ and physicians’ clinical ethical conflicts that cut across the spectrum of clinical specialty areas, and compares the themes identified by nurses with those identified by physicians. We interviewed 34 clinical nurses, 10 nurse managers and 31 physicians working at four different Canadian hospitals (...)
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  25. Clinical Ethics Theory and Practice.C. Barry Hoffmaster, Benjamin Freedman, Gwen Fraser & Westminster Institute for Ethics and Human Values - 1989
     
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  26.  5
    Clinical Ethics Consultation After God: Implications for Advocacy and Neutrality.J. Clint Parker - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (2):103-115.
    In After God: Morality and Bioethics in a Secular Age, H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. explores the broad implications for moral reasoning once a culture has lost a God’s-eye perspective. In this paper, I focus on the implications of Engelhardt’s views for clinical ethics consultation. I begin by examining the question of whether clinical ethics consultants should advocate a particular viewpoint and/or process during consultations or adopt a neutral stance. I then examine the implications of Engelhardt’s views (...)
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  27.  21
    Introducing Clinical Ethics Consultation Service in Malaysia: A SWOT Analysis.Erwin Jiayuan Khoo, Siew Houy Chua, Meow-Keong Thong, Bin Alwi Zilfalil & John Lantos - 2019 - Clinical Ethics 14 (1):26-32.
    Clinical ethics consultation service remains undeveloped in developing countries. It is recognised that its introduction poses challenges. Malaysia, a multicultural society with diverse religions, values and perceptions further complicate the introduction of formal clinical ethics consultation service. Clinicians attending a national congress workshop completed a Strengths–Weaknesses–Opportunities–Threats analysis. The aim was to gain insight into clinician’s expectations and promote initiatives leading to the introduction of clinical ethics consultation service. Clinicians agree that clinical ethics (...)
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  28.  5
    Clinical Ethics Committees – Also for Mental Health Care? The Norwegian Experience.Irene Syse, Reidun Førde & Reidar Pedersen - 2016 - Clinical Ethics 11 (2-3):81-86.
    Background The aim was to explore how the clinical ethics committees in Norway have worked and functioned within mental health care and addiction treatment services. Methods Analysis of 256 annual reports from clinical ethics committees from 2003 to 2012 and a survey to clinicians who had used a clinical ethics committee. Results Dilemmas related to coercion, confidentiality, information, and patient autonomy dominated. The committees established only for psychiatric hospitals, had received more cases from mental (...)
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  29.  48
    Implicit and Explicit Clinical Ethics Support in The Netherlands: A Mixed Methods Overview Study. [REVIEW]Linda Dauwerse, Froukje Weidema, Tineke Abma, Bert Molewijk & Guy Widdershoven - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (2):95-109.
    Internationally, the prevalence of clinical ethics support (CES) in health care has increased over the years. Previous research on CES focused primarily on ethics committees and ethics consultation, mostly within the context of hospital care. The purpose of this article is to investigate the prevalence of different kinds of CES in various Dutch health care domains, including hospital care, mental health care, elderly care and care for people with an intellectual disability. A mixed methods design was (...)
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  30. Severing Clinical Ethics Consultation From the Ethical Commitments and Preferences of Clinical Ethics Consultants.Ana S. Iltis - 2022 - Christian Bioethics 28 (2):122-133.
    Recent work calls for excluding clinical ethics consultants’ religious ethical commitments from formulating recommendations about particular cases and communicating those recommendations. I demonstrate that three arguments that call for excluding religious ethical commitments from this work logically imply that consultants may not use their secular ethical commitments in their work. The call to sever clinical ethics consultation from the ethical commitments of clinical ethics consultants has implications for the scope of work consultants may do (...)
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  31. Clinical Ethics Committees and Pediatrics. An Evaluation of Case Consultations.Tanja Ramsauer & Andreas Frewer - 2009 - Diametros 22:90 – 104.
    Since Clinical Ethics Consultation has become important in the public health sector in the last decade in Germany, there are on-going questions about effectiveness. Targets have been established by the Ethics Committees, in regard to assisting patients, families and health care teams at times of ethical conflicts during the decision-making process in medical care. Of all the ethics consultations over the last eight years at Erlangen University Hospital the consultations carried out in the pediatric department were (...)
     
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  32.  45
    Integrative Clinical Ethics Support in Gender Affirmative Care: Lessons Learned.Laura Hartman, Guy Widdershoven, Annelou de Vries, Annelijn Wensing-Kruger, Martin den Heijer, Thomas Steensma & Bert Molewijk - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (3):241-260.
    Clinical ethics support for health care professionals and patients is increasingly seen as part of good health care. However, there is a key drawback to the way CES services are currently offered. They are often performed as isolated and one-off services whose ownership and impact are unclear. This paper describes the development of an integrative approach to CES at the Center of Expertise and Care for Gender Dysphoria at Amsterdam University Medical Center. We specifically aimed to integrate CES (...)
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  33.  20
    Taxonomizing Views of Clinical Ethics Expertise.Erica K. Salter & Abram Brummett - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):50-61.
    Our aim in this article is to bring some clarity to the clinical ethics expertise debate by critiquing and replacing the taxonomy offered by the Core Competencies report. The orienting question for our taxonomy is: Can clinical ethicists offer justified, normative recommendations for active patient cases? Views that answer “no” are characterized as a “negative” view of clinical ethics expertise and are further differentiated based on why they think ethicists cannot give justified normative recommendations and (...)
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  34.  7
    Implementing Clinical Ethics Committees as a Complex Intervention: Presentation of a Feasibility Study in Community Care.Morten Magelssen, Heidi Karlsen, Reidar Pedersen & Lisbeth Thoresen - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-9.
    Background How should clinical ethics support services such as clinical ethics committees be implemented and evaluated? We argue that both the CEC itself and the implementation of the CEC should be considered as ‘complex interventions’. Main text We present a research project involving the implementation of CECs in community care in four Norwegian municipalities. We show that when both the CEC and its implementation are considered as complex interventions, important consequences follow – both for implementation and (...)
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  35.  8
    Clinical Ethics Dilemmas in a Low-Income Setting - a National Survey Among Physicians in Ethiopia.Ingrid Miljeteig, Frehiwot Defaye, Dawit Desalegn & Marion Danis - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-13.
    Ethical dilemmas are part of medicine, but the type of challenges, the frequency of their occurrence and the nuances in the difficulties have not been systematically studied in low-income settings. The objective of this paper was to map out the ethical dilemmas from the perspective of Ethiopian physicians working in public hospitals. A national survey of physicians from 49 public hospitals using stratified, multi-stage sampling was conducted in six of the 11 regions in Ethiopia. Descriptive statistics were used and the (...)
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  36. Integrative Clinical Ethics Support in Gender Affirmative Care: Lessons Learned.Laura Hartman, Guy Widdershoven, Annelou de Vries, Annelijn Wensing-Kruger, Martin den Heijer, Thomas Steensma & Bert Molewijk - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (3):241-260.
    Clinical ethics support for health care professionals and patients is increasingly seen as part of good health care. However, there is a key drawback to the way CES services are currently offered. They are often performed as isolated and one-off services whose ownership and impact are unclear. This paper describes the development of an integrative approach to CES at the Center of Expertise and Care for Gender Dysphoria at Amsterdam University Medical Center. We specifically aimed to integrate CES (...)
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  37.  21
    Clinical Ethics Committees: A Due Process Wasteland?S. A. M. McLean - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (2):99-104.
    The development of clinical ethic support in the UK arguably brings with it a series of legal questions, which need to be addressed. Most particularly, these concern questions of due process and formal justice, which I argue are central to the provision of appropriate ethical advice. In this article, I will compare the UK position with the more developed system in the USA, which often provides a template for development in the UK. While it is not argued that the (...)
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  38. Clinical Ethics: Consent for Vaccination in Children.Dominic Wilkinson & Antonia McBride - forthcoming - Archives of Disease in Childhood.
    The prospect of vaccinating children and young people (CYP) against COVID raises questions that apply more widely to vaccination in children. When can CYP consent, on their own, for vaccination? What should happen if children and their parents disagree about the desirability of a vaccine? When, if ever, should vaccination proceed despite a child’s dissent or apparent refusal? A range of ethical dilemmas may arise. (Box 1) In this article, we will address general ethical issues relating to consent for vaccination, (...)
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  39.  3
    Clinical Ethics Expertise & the Antidote to Provider Values-Imposition.Autumn Fiester - 2018 - In Jamie Carlin Watson & Laura K. Guidry-Grimes (eds.), Moral Expertise: New Essays From Theoretical and Clinical Bioethics. Springer Verlag.
    Many clinical ethics services issue recommendations about ethical controversies that arise in patient care. Their role is configured to be arbiters of moral permissibility, rendering verdicts on which option of those available constitute the morally superior course of action. They produce moral judgements on questions, such as: Should dialysis be started or foregone? Should life-sustaining care be withdrawn or continued? Is it permissible for the clinician to refuse a course of treatment desired by a particular patient or family? (...)
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  40.  14
    Evaluating the Effectiveness of Clinical Ethics Committees: A Systematic Review.Chiara Crico, Virginia Sanchini, Paolo Giovanni Casali & Gabriella Pravettoni - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (1):135-151.
    Clinical Ethics Committees, as distinct from Research Ethics Committees, were originally established with the aim of supporting healthcare professionals in managing controversial clinical ethical issues. However, it is still unclear whether they manage to accomplish this task and what is their impact on clinical practice. This systematic review aims to collect available assessments of CECs’ performance as reported in literature, in order to evaluate CECs’ effectiveness. We retrieved all literature published up to November 2019 in (...)
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  41.  20
    Integrative Clinical Ethics Support in Gender Affirmative Care: Lessons Learned.Bert Molewijk, Thomas Steensma, Martin Heijer, Annelijn Wensing-Kruger, Annelou Vries, Guy Widdershoven & Laura Hartman - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (3):241-260.
    Clinical ethics support for health care professionals and patients is increasingly seen as part of good health care. However, there is a key drawback to the way CES services are currently offered. They are often performed as isolated and one-off services whose ownership and impact are unclear. This paper describes the development of an integrative approach to CES at the Center of Expertise and Care for Gender Dysphoria at Amsterdam University Medical Center. We specifically aimed to integrate CES (...)
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  42.  17
    Neglected Ends: Clinical Ethics Consultation and the Prospects for Closure.Autumn Fiester - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (1):29-36.
    Clinical ethics consultations are sometimes deemed complete at the moment when the consultants make a recommendation. In CECs that involve actual ethical conflict, this view of a consult's endpoint runs the risk of overemphasizing the conflict's resolution at the expense of the consult's process, which can have deleterious effects on the various parties in the conflict. This overly narrow focus on reaching a decision or recommendation in consults that involve profound moral disagreement can result in two types of (...)
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  43.  24
    Implementation of Clinical Ethics Consultation in German Hospitals.Maximilian Schochow, Dajana Schnell & Florian Steger - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (4):985-991.
    In order to build on the information that was obtained in the course of the first study, a follow-up survey was conducted first by phone and subsequently in a written form between August and October 2014. We contacted 1.858 hospitals in all of Germany for the follow-up survey by phone. In cases where a hospital had not participated in the first study, the willingness to participate in the follow-up survey was established in advance. The survey’s dispatch was ensured in the (...)
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  44.  37
    Clinical Ethics Committee Case 13: Should the School Doctor Contact the Mother of a 17-Year-Old Girl Who has Expressed Suicidal Thoughts? [REVIEW]Bert Molewijk & Rolf Ahlzen - 2011 - Clinical Ethics 6 (1):5-10.
  45.  38
    Clinical Ethics as Liaison Service: Concepts and Experiences in Collaboration with Operative Medicine.Gerd Richter - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (4):360.
    Over the past decade, clinical ethics has received growing attention in Germany as in most European countries. In the mid-1990s, most European countries made efforts to establish healthcare ethics committees and clinical ethics consultation services. The development of clinical ethics discourse and activities in Germany, however, was delayed and, consequently, is still in its natal phase. Until the end of the 1990s, the only institutionalized bodies of ethical reflection were the research ethics (...)
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  46.  85
    Clinical Ethics and Nursing: "Yes" to Caring, but "No" to a Female Ethics of Care.Helga Kuhse - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):207–219.
    According to a contemporary school of thought there is a specific female approach to ethics which is based not on abstract “male” ethical principles or rules, but on “care”. Nurses have taken a keen interest in these female approaches to ethics. Drawing on the views expounded by Carol Gilligan and Nel Noddings, nurses claim that a female “ethics of care” better captures their moral experiences than a traditional male “ethics of justice”. This paper argues that “care” (...)
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  47.  21
    Clinical Ethics and Values: How Do Norms Evolve From Practice?Marta Spranzi - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):93-103.
    Bioethics laws in France have just undergone a revision process. The bioethics debate is often cast in terms of ethical principles and norms resisting emerging social and technological practices. This leads to the expression of confrontational attitudes based on widely differing interpretations of the same principles and values, and ultimately results in a deadlock. In this paper I would like to argue that focusing on values, as opposed to norms and principles, provides an interesting perspective on the evolution of norms. (...)
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  48.  11
    Clinical Ethics in Forensic Psychiatry: Fostering Reflection and Dialog on the Ward Through Moral Case Deliberation.Yolande Voskes, Frouk Weidema & Guy Widdershoven - 2016 - Clinical Ethics 11 (2-3):63-69.
    Forensic psychiatry is pervaded by moral dilemmas. Although professionals in forensic psychiatry are trained in law and psychiatry and are certainly aware of ethical issues in the care for patients, they tend to make decisions in an implicit way and not to discuss their moral concerns or doubts. More structural attention for ethics seems to be required. In this paper, we show the value of moral case deliberation in forensic psychiatry. Moral case deliberation is a specific kind of (...) ethics support in which healthcare professionals discuss a moral issue from practice in a structured way, facilitated by an ethicist or specifically trained facilitator. It is applicable to a wide array of situations in healthcare practice. In contrast to other models of clinical ethics support, such as individual consultation, the focus is on the moral experience of professionals and using a structured method to foster dialog and joint moral learning. In this paper, an example of case on a forensic ward is presented. The case shows that moral case deliberation leads to reflection on values and stimulates openness and honesty regarding uncertainties. Moreover, the deliberation provides room for new insights and creates a basis for a joint decision on how to proceed further, recognizing the tensions and difficulties involved. (shrink)
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  49. Clinical Ethics and the Dynamics of Group Decision-Making: Applying the Psychological Data to Decisions Made by Ethics Committees. [REVIEW]Erica K. Rangel - 2009 - HEC Forum 21 (2):207-228.
    Clinical Ethics and the Dynamics of Group Decision-Making: Applying the Psychological Data to Decisions Made by Ethics Committees Content Type Journal Article Pages 207-228 DOI 10.1007/s10730-009-9096-7 Authors Erica K. Rangel, Saint Louis University Department of Health Care Ethics 6333 North Rosebury Ave #3W St. Louis MO 63105 USA Journal HEC Forum Online ISSN 1572-8498 Print ISSN 0956-2737 Journal Volume Volume 21 Journal Issue Volume 21, Number 2.
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  50. Clinical Ethics as Medical Hermeneutics.David C. Thomasma - 1994 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (2).
    There are several branches of ethics. Clinical ethics, the one closest to medical decisionmaking, can be seen as a branch of medicine itself. In this view, clinical ethics is a unitary hermeneutics. Its rule is a guideline for unifying other theories of ethics in conjunction with the clinical context. Put another way, clinical ethics interprets the clinical situation in light of a balance of other values that, while guiding the decisionmaking (...)
     
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