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  1. Margaret P. Battin is professor of phi-losophy at the University of Utah. She recently authored Ending Life (Oxford, 2005) and coauthored The Patient as Victim and Vector: Ethics and Infectious.Daniel Callahan, Gary Duhon & Ellen K. Feder - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  2. The missing link: the physician and assisted suicide.Amir Halevy - forthcoming - Bioethics Forum.
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  3. Physician.James Jelinek & Melanie Howard - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  4. Physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia before, during, and after the holocaustPhysician-assisted suicide and euthanasia before, during, and after the holocaust, edited by Sheldon Rubenfeld and Daniel P. Sumasy, with Astrid Ley, pp. 344, Lanham, MD, Lexington Books, 2020, £96 (Hardback), ISBN: 9781793609496. [REVIEW]David Albert Jones - forthcoming - The New Bioethics.
    At the time of writing, a British Member of Parliament has just been suspended from his Party for posting a Tweet in which he compared the level of serious adverse events after vaccination for COVI...
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  5. Physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia before, during, and after the holocaust.David Albert Jones - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-4.
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  6. The Strange Implications for Bioethics of Taking Christianity Seriously.Stephen Kershnar - forthcoming - Sophia:1-21.
    In this paper, I argue for two theses. First, if Christianity is true, then morality should depend on the metaphysics of the afterlife. Second, if Christianity is true, then contemporary moral theory is mistaken. The argument for the first thesis rests on two premises. If rightness depends on an act’s effects on an individual, then—at least in part—it depends on the long-term effects on him. If rightness depends—at least in part—on the long-term effects on an individual, then it depends on (...)
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  7. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide.Michael Langford - forthcoming - Christians and Bioethics.
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  8. Regent demographic developments in switzerland.Kurt Mayer - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  9. Commentary on "Suicide, Euthanasia, and the Psychiatrist".Kelleher Michael J. - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (2):145-149.
  10. The Physician-Assisted Suicide Pathway in Italy: Ethical Assessment and Safeguard Approaches.Luciana Riva - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-8.
    Although in Italy there is currently no effective law on physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia, Decision No. 242 issued by the Italian Constitutional Court on September 25, 2019 established that an individual who, under specific circumstances, has facilitated the implementation of an independent and freely-formed resolve to commit suicide by another individual is exempt from criminal liability. Following this ruling, some citizens have submitted requests for assisted suicide to the public health system, generating a situation of great uncertainty in the application (...)
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  11. Euthanasia and assisted suicide: Who are the vulnerable?Meta Rus & Chris Gastmans - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics.
    One of the common domains in health care in which the concept of vulnerability is used is end-of-life care, including euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS). Since different uses and implications of the notion have been recognised in the literature on EAS, this paper aims to analyse them and reflect on who is the most vulnerable in the context of EAS. A prior exploratory review of the literature has served as a starting point for the discussion. We concluded that vulnerability is (...)
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  12. At Law: Constitutional Flaw?Carl E. Schneider - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  13. The discovery and development of dolphin-assisted therapy.B. Smith - forthcoming - Between Species: Celebrating the Dolphin-Human Bond. Sierra Club Books, San Francisco.
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  14. When suffering is unbearable: Physicians, assisted suicide, and euthanasia.John R. Williams - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  15. The Physician.Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh - 2nd ed. 2015 - In Handbook of Analytic Philosophy of Medicine. Springer Verlag.
    In Western culture, human medicine has evolved as a healing profession, and as such, it is oriented toward curing sick people, caring for sick people, preventing maladies, and promoting health. This orientation is primarily centered around the healing relationship, a relationship that is usually thought of as a dyadic structure, comprising the physician and the patient. Venerable terms such as “the physician-patient relationship” and “the doctor-patient interaction” reflect this view. A closer look at the structure of a healing relationship reveals, (...)
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  16. Terminalism and assisted suicide.Philip Reed - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (2):124-125.
    Four of the commentaries criticised my claim that assisted suicide for the terminally ill is discriminatory. 1 They were united in this judgement roughly because they insisted that assisted suicide is in fact a benefit and not a harm. I concede that if it is a benefit, then there is no way in which the terminally ill can be disadvantaged by it and hence no way it can be an instance of discrimination. I pointed out in the article that this (...)
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  17. Clinical Ethics Consultation and Physician Assisted Suicide.David M. Adams - 2023 - In Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer Verlag. pp. 93-115.
    In this paper I attempt to address what appears to be a novel theoretical and practical problem concerning physician-assisted suicide (PAS). This problem arises out of a newly created set of circumstances in which persons are hospitalized in jurisdictions where PAS, though now legally available to patients, remains morally contentious. When moral disagreements over PAS come to divide physicians, patients, and family members, it is quite likely they will today find their way to the hospital’s consulting ethicist, a member of (...)
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  18. Preventing the Slide down the Slippery Slope from Assisted Suicide to Euthanasia While Protecting the Rights of People with Disabilities Who Are “Not Dead Yet.”.George J. Annas & Heidi B. Kummer - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (9):20-22.
    Since at least the advent of Jack Kevorkian’s “suicide machine” the major argument against adopting physician-assisted suicide laws has been that they will lead us down a slippery slope to state-sa...
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  19. An autonomy-based approach to assisted suicide: a way to avoid the expressivist objection against assisted dying laws.Esther Braun - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (7):497-501.
    In several jurisdictions, irremediable suffering from a medical condition is a legal requirement for access to assisted dying. According to the expressivist objection, allowing assisted dying for a specific group of persons, such as those with irremediable medical conditions, expresses the judgment that their lives are not worth living. While the expressivist objection has often been used to argue that assisted dying should not be legalised, I show that there is an alternative solution available to its proponents. An autonomy-based approach (...)
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  20. Assisted suicide and the discrimination argument: Can people with mental illness fulfill beneficence‐ and autonomy‐based eligibility criteria?Esther Braun, Matthé Scholten & Jochen Vollmann - 2023 - Bioethics 38 (1):61-68.
    According to the “discrimination argument,” it would be discriminatory and hence impermissible to categorically exclude people with mental illness (PMI) from access to assisted suicide (AS) if AS is accessible to people with somatic illnesses. In objection to this, it could be argued that excluding PMI is not discriminatory, but rather based on their inability to meet certain eligibility criteria for AS. Which criteria are deemed necessary depends on the approach taken to justifying AS. In this article, we describe two (...)
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  21. Envisioning Markets in Assisted Dying.Michael Cholbi - 2023 - In Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer. pp. 263-278.
    Ethical debates about assisted dying typically assume that only medical professionals should be able to provide patients with assisted dying. This assumption partially rests on the unstated principle that assisted dying providers may not be motivated by pecuniary considerations. Here I outline and defend a mixed provider model of assisted dying provision that contests this principle. Under this model, medically competent non-physician professionals could receive fees for providing assisted dying under the same terms and conditions as physicians can in those (...)
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  22. Against commercial‐assisted suicide.Yoann Della Croce - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (7):617-623.
    The idea of commercial‐assisted suicide lives a marginal existence in the bioethical literature, despite its significant presence in popular culture. The practice of commercial‐assisted suicide (CAS) is defined as suicide assistance performed for a financial reward through a contractual agreement between a customer and a service‐provider, who does not necessarily need to be a medical professional. While CAS does indeed offer some potential solutions regarding the moral controversies surrounding physician‐assisted suicide (PAS), I defend the idea that adopting it as policy (...)
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  23. Undoing Suicidism: A Trans, Queer, Crip Approach to Rethinking (Assisted) Suicide by Alexandre Baril.Travis Dumsday - 2023 - International Philosophical Quarterly 63 (2):245-248.
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  24. Assisted suicide and the European convention on human rights Assisted suicide and the European convention on human rights, by Stevie Martin, Abingdon: Routledge, 2021, pp. 220, £36.99, ISBN 978-0-367-62843-7. [REVIEW]James E. Hurford - 2023 - The New Bioethics 29 (4):382-385.
    When a judgment begins ‘counsel made some bold submissions’, this is usually a sign the judge found the argument unconvincing. Dr Martin – Tutor and Fellow in Constitutional and Human Rights Law at...
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  25. An Ethics Journey: From Kant to Assisted Suicide.Michael Gordon - 2023 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 6 (1):106-108.
    Most of us would agree with the almost trite saying that “life is a journey”. Of course it is, unless it ends tragically at birth, and even then it is a very short journey. All of us can describe how we got from one stage in life to another, whether personal, family, education or career. Many journeys seem to be in an almost straight line while others meander from one place to another, changing direction and alternating goals, sometimes zigging back (...)
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  26. License to Kill: A New Model for Excusing Medically Assisted Dying?Jonathan Ives & Richard Huxtable - 2023 - In Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer Verlag. pp. 117-136.
    In this chapter, we seek to offer a fresh perspective on whether or not doctors should be “licensed to kill”. As that phrase indicates, we metaphorically refer to the adventures of fictional spy James Bond, although we hope, in doing so, that readers will not think that we are belittling the serious topic with which the chapter is concerned. Having surveyed some of the familiar arguments for and against allowing medically-assisted dying, we advance a new proposal, which seeks to strike (...)
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  27. Assisted Dying for Individuals with Dementia: Challenges for Translating Ethical Positions into Law.Georgia Lloyd-Smith & Jocelyn Downie - 2023 - In Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer Verlag. pp. 67-92.
    In this chapter, we explore the issue of assisted dying for individuals with dementia at the nexus of ethics and law. We set out the basic medical realities of dementia and the available data about the desire for the option of assisted dying in the face of dementia. We then describe law and practice with respect to voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide in jurisdictions that permit at least some assisted dying. We conclude that, because of the peculiar ways in which (...)
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  28. Value of and Value in Language: Ethics and Semantics in Physician-Assisted Suicide Laws.Thomas J. Reilly & Lauren B. Solberg - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (9):40-42.
    The legalization of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) in various U.S. states draws into question the interpretation of the cardinal virtues of medicine, including beneficence, non-maleficence, auton...
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  29. Saving Lives with Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Organ Donation After Assisted Dying.David M. Shaw - 2023 - In Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer Verlag. pp. 137-144.
    In this chapter I consider the narrow and wider benefits of permitting assisted dying in the specific context of organ donation and transplantation. In addition to the commonly used arguments, there are two other neglected reasons for permitting assisted suicide and/or euthanasia: assisted dying enables those who do not wish to remain alive to prolong the lives of those who do, and also allows many more people to fulfill their wish to donate organs after death. In the first part of (...)
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  30. Mental Illness, Lack of Autonomy, and Physician-Assisted Death.Jukka Varelius - 2023 - In Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer Verlag. pp. 59-77.
    In this chapter, I consider the idea that physician-assisted death might come into question in the cases of psychiatric patients who are incapable of making autonomous choices about ending their lives. I maintain that the main arguments for physician-assisted death found in recent medical ethical literature support physician-assisted death in some of those cases. After assessing several possible criticisms of what I have argued, I conclude that the idea that physicianassisted death can be acceptable in some cases of psychiatric patients (...)
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  31. Review: Kamm, almost over: Aging, Dying, Death. [REVIEW]Michael Cholbi - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 17 (1):223-228.
  32. Assisted suicide for prisoners: An ethical and legal analysis from the Swiss context.Yoann Della Croce - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (4):381-387.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 4, Page 381-387, May 2022.
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  33. Escape from the medically assisted suicide spiral.Murray Earle - 2022 - In G. T. Laurie, E. S. Dove & Niamh Nic Shuibhne (eds.), Law and legacy in medical jurisprudence: essays in honour of Graeme Laurie. Cambridge University Press.
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  34. Attitudes about withholding or withdrawing life-prolonging treatment, euthanasia, assisted suicide, and physician assisted suicide: a cross-sectional survey among the general public in Croatia.Chris Gastmans, Bert Gordijn, Diana Spoljar, Jurica Vukovic, Filip Rubic, Milivoj Novak, Stjepan Oreskovic, Krunoslav Nikodem, Marko Curkovic & Ana Borovecki - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-16.
    BackgroundThere has been no in-depth research of public attitudes on withholding or withdrawing life-prolonging treatment, euthanasia, assisted suicide and physician assisted suicide in Croatia. The aim of this study was to examine these attitudes and their correlation with sociodemographic characteristics, religion, political orientation, tolerance of personal choice, trust in physicians, health status, experiences with death and caring for the seriously ill, and attitudes towards death and dying. MethodsA cross-sectional study was conducted on a three-stage random sample of adult citizens of (...)
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  35. Ambivalence toward euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide has decreased among physicians in Finland.Juho T. Lehto, Jukka Vänskä, Pekka Louhiala & Reetta P. Piili - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundDebates around euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are ongoing around the globe. Public support has been mounting in Western countries, while some decline has been observed in the USA and Eastern Europe. Physicians’ support for euthanasia and PAS has been lower than that of the general public, but a trend toward higher acceptance among physicians has been seen in recent years. The aim of this study was to examine the current attitudes of Finnish physicians toward euthanasia and PAS and whether there (...)
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  36. Alzheimer’s disease: history, ethics and medical humanities in the context of assisted suicide. [REVIEW]Thomas Horst Loew, Joachim Demling & Birgit Braun - 2022 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 17 (1):1-7.
    IntroductionDementia diseases, especially Alzheimer’s disease (AD), are of considerable importance in terms of social policy and health economics. Moreover, against the background of the current Karlsruhe judgement on the legalisation of assisted suicide, there are also questions to be asked about medical humanities in AD.MethodologyRelevant literature on complementary forms of therapy and prognosis was included and discussed.ResultsCreative sociotherapeutic approaches (art, music, dance) and validating psychotherapeutic approaches show promise for suitability and efficiency in the treatment of dementia, but in some cases (...)
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  37. Physician-Assisted Suicide, the Right to Die, and Misconceptions About Life.Mario Tito Ferreira Moreno & Pedro Fior Mota De Andrade - 2022 - Human Affairs 32 (1):14-27.
    In this paper, we analyze the legal situation regarding physician-assisted suicide in the world. Our hypothesis is that the prohibitive stance on physician-assisted suicide in most societies in the world today seems to be related to our moral attitudes toward suicide. This brings us to a discussion about life itself. We claim that the total lack of legal protection for physician-assisted suicide from international organizations and most countries in the world lies in a philosophical assumption that supports much of our (...)
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  38. Colombian people's positions regarding physician-assisted suicide.Claudia Pineda Marín, Lina Franco Sierra, Paul Clay Sorum & Etienne Mullet - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (3):286-289.
    The views on the acceptability of physician-assisted suicide of lay people in a Latin American country, Colombia, have been examined. In July 2019–January 2020, 134 lay people in Bogota judged the acceptability of physician-assisted suicide in 48 realistic scenarios composed of all combinations of four factors: the patient's age, the level of incurability of the illness, the type of suffering, and the patient's request for physician-assisted suicide. In all scenarios, the patients were women receiving the best possible care. The ratings (...)
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  39. Opinions of nurses regarding Euthanasia and Medically Assisted Suicide.Tamara Raquel Velasco Sanz, Ana María Cabrejas Casero, Yolanda Rodríguez González, José Antonio Barbado Albaladejo, Lydia Frances Mower Hanlon & María Isabel Guerra Llamas - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (7-8):1721-1738.
    BackgroundSafeguarding the right to die according to the principles of autonomy and freedom of each person has become more important in the last decade, therefore increasing regulation of Euthanasi...
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  40. Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Comparative Analysis of Dutch and East Asian Cases.Fengmin Shao, Yue Gu, Zhenxiang Zhang, Hui Zhang & Yuming Wang - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (2):74-76.
    The target article describes a Dutch case that happened in 2008, where Albert Heringa helped his 98-year-old mother, whose general practitioner rejected her request for an assisted d...
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  41. Overcoming Acceptance of Physician-Assisted Suicide.Columba Thomas - 2022 - Ethics and Medics 47 (2):1-2.
    Acceptance of Physician-Assisted Suicide has been on the rise, especially in recent years. However, it is the position of the Catholic church that this practice denies the inherent dignity of all human beings from the point of conception to natural death. The Art of Dying, a classic Catholic text recently translated into English, provides a more compassionate, faithful, and dignified approach to end-of-life care that recognizes the rights of the dying, as well as their loved ones, while remaining faithful to (...)
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  42. Depression and Physician-Aid-in-Dying.Ian Tully - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (3):368-386.
    In this paper, I address the question of whether it is ever permissible to grant a request for physician-aid-in-dying (PAD) from an individual suffering from treatment-resistant depression. I assume for the sake of argument that PAD is sometimes permissible. There are three requirements for PAD: suffering, prognosis, and competence. First, an individual must be suffering from an illness or injury which is sufficient to cause serious, ongoing hardship. Second, one must have exhausted effective treatment options, and one’s prospects for recovery (...)
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  43. Spanish regulation of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.Tamara Raquel Velasco Sanz, Pilar Pinto Pastor, Beatriz Moreno-Milán, Lydia Frances Mower Hanlon & Benjamin Herreros - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (1):49-55.
    In March 2021, the Spanish Congress approved the law regulating euthanasia, that regulates both euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS). In this article, we analyse the Spanish law regulating euthanasia and PAS, comparing it with the rest of the European laws on euthanasia and PAS (Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg). Identified strengths of the Spanish law, with respect to other norms, are that it is a law with many safeguards, which broadly recognises professionals’ right to conscientious objection and the specification that it (...)
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  44. The Judgment of the German Federal Constitutional Court regarding assisted suicide: a template for pluralistic states?Urban Wiesing - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (8):542-546.
    The article presents the judgment of the German Federal Constitutional Court from 26 February 2020 on assisted suicide. The statements regarding human dignity, human rights and the relationship between citizens and the state are examined. Furthermore, the consequences resulting from this interpretation of human dignity for states that are pluralistic and based on human rights will be laid out. The court’s judgment limits the power of parliaments and poses a challenge to many laws in states that see themselves as pluralistic, (...)
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  45. Aristotle on the Nature and Politics of Medicine.Samuel H. Baker - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):441-449.
    According to Aristotle, the medical art aims at health, which is a virtue of the body, and does so in an unlimited way. Consequently, medicine does not determine the extent to which health should be pursued, and “mental health” falls under medicine only via pros hen predication. Because medicine is inherently oriented to its end, it produces health in accordance with its nature and disease contrary to its nature—even when disease is good for the patient. Aristotle’s politician understands that this (...)
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  46. Exploring the Philosophy of Death and Dying: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives.Michael Cholbi & Travis Timmerman (eds.) - 2021 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    Exploring the Philosophy of Death and Dying: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives is the first book to offer students the full breadth of philosophical issues that are raised by the end of life. Included are many of the essential voices that have contributed to the philosophy of death and dying throughout history and in contemporary research. The 38 chapters in its nine sections contain classic texts and new short argumentative essays, specially commission for this volume by world-leading contemporary experts. Exploring the (...)
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  47. Dying under a Description? Physician-Assisted Suicide, Persons, and Solidarity.Darlene Fozard Weaver - 2021 - Christian Bioethics 27 (3):298-311.
    Debates over physician-assisted suicide comprise a small portion of broader culture wars. Their role in the culture wars obscures an under-acknowledged consensus between those who support PAS and those who oppose it. Drawing insights from personalism, this essay situates PAS within larger moral obligations of solidarity with the dying and their caregivers. The contributions of Roman Catholic personalism relocate debates over PAS and allow us to harness shared moral impulses.
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  48. Medical assistance in dying for the psychiatrically ill: Reply to Buturovic.Joshua James Hatherley - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):259-260.
  49. Trends in Swedish physicians’ attitudes towards physician-assisted suicide: a cross-sectional study.Niklas Juth, Mikael Sandlund, Ingemar Engström, Anna Lindblad & Niels Lynøe - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-9.
    AimsTo examine attitudes towards physician-assisted suicide (PAS) among physicians in Sweden and compare these with the results from a similar cross-sectional study performed in 2007.ParticipantsA random selection of 250 physicians from each of six specialties (general practice, geriatrics, internal medicine, oncology, surgery and psychiatry) and all 127 palliative care physicians in Sweden were invited to participate in this study.SettingA postal questionnaire commissioned by the Swedish Medical Society in collaboration with Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. ResultsThe total response rate was 59.2%. Slightly (...)
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  50. Sinnverneinung. Warum der assistierte Suizid uns alle angeht.Roland Kipke - 2021 - Ethik in der Medizin 33 (4):521-538.
    Definition of the problem: The ethical debate about assisted suicide remains controversial and is also based in part on assumptions that are taken for granted, but which, on closer inspection, lack a justification. Arguments: The article develops a new approach by focusing on the social dimension of the denial of meaning in life, which is often expressed by suicides. For a fundamental social connection is included in the human orientation towards the goal of a meaningful life, namely an implicit appreciation (...)
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