Order:
Disambiguations
Jonathan Ives [44]J. Ives [4]J. Moss Ives [4]Jeffrey C. Ives [1]
Jonathan C. S. Ives [1]John A. Ives [1]
  1.  25
    What is ‘moral distress’? A narrative synthesis of the literature.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Fiona Irvine - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (3):646-662.
    Aims:The aim of this narrative synthesis was to explore the necessary and sufficient conditions required to define moral distress.Background:Moral distress is said to occur when one has made a moral judgement but is unable to act upon it. However, problems with this narrow conception have led to multiple redefinitions in the empirical and conceptual literature. As a consequence, much of the research exploring moral distress has lacked conceptual clarity, complicating attempts to study the phenomenon.Design:Systematic literature review and narrative synthesis (November (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  2.  51
    A systematic review of empirical bioethics methodologies.Rachel Davies, Jonathan C. S. Ives & Michael Dunn - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):15.
    Despite the increased prevalence of bioethics research that seeks to use empirical data to answer normative research questions, there is no consensus as to what an appropriate methodology for this would be. This review aims to search the literature, present and critically discuss published Empirical Bioethics methodologies.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  3.  77
    Standards of practice in empirical bioethics research: towards a consensus.Jonathan Ives, Michael Dunn, Bert Molewijk, Jan Schildmann, Kristine Bærøe, Lucy Frith, Richard Huxtable, Elleke Landeweer, Marcel Mertz, Veerle Provoost, Annette Rid, Sabine Salloch, Mark Sheehan, Daniel Strech, Martine de Vries & Guy Widdershoven - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):68.
    This paper responds to the commentaries from Stacy Carter and Alan Cribb. We pick up on two main themes in our response. First, we reflect on how the process of setting standards for empirical bioethics research entails drawing boundaries around what research counts as empirical bioethics research, and we discuss whether the standards agreed in the consensus process draw these boundaries correctly. Second, we expand on the discussion in the original paper of the role and significance of the concept of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  4.  9
    What is ‘moral distress’ in nursing? A feminist empirical bioethics study.Georgina Morley, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Jonathan Ives - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (5):1297-1314.
    BackgroundThe phenomenon of ‘moral distress’ has continued to be a popular topic for nursing research. However, much of the scholarship has lacked conceptual clarity, and there is debate about what it means to experience moral distress. Moral distress remains an obscure concept to many clinical nurses, especially those outside of North America, and there is a lack of empirical research regarding its impact on nurses in the United Kingdom and its relevance to clinical practice.Research aimTo explore the concept of moral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  5.  17
    Reasons to Redefine Moral Distress: A Feminist Empirical Bioethics Analysis.Georgina Morley, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Jonathan Ives - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):61-71.
    There has been increasing debate in recent years about the conceptualization of moral distress. Broadly speaking, two groups of scholars have emerged: those who agree with Jameton’s ‘narrow definition’ that focuses on constraint and those who argue that Jameton’s definition is insufficient and needs to be broadened. Using feminist empirical bioethics, we interviewed critical care nurses in the United Kingdom about their experiences and conceptualizations of moral distress. We provide our broader definition of moral distress and examples of data that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  6.  88
    Appropriate methodologies for empirical bioethics: It's all relative.Jonathan Ives & Heather Draper - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (4):249-258.
    In this article we distinguish between philosophical bioethics (PB), descriptive policy orientated bioethics (DPOB) and normative policy oriented bioethics (NPOB). We argue that finding an appropriate methodology for combining empirical data and moral theory depends on what the aims of the research endeavour are, and that, for the most part, this combination is only required for NPOB. After briefly discussing the debate around the is/ought problem, and suggesting that both sides of this debate are misunderstanding one another (i.e. one side (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  7.  32
    Moral Distress and Austerity: An Avoidable Ethical Challenge in Healthcare.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives & Caroline Bradbury-Jones - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (3):185-201.
    Austerity, by its very nature, imposes constraints by limiting the options for action available to us because certain courses of action are too costly or insufficiently cost effective. In the context of healthcare, the constraints imposed by austerity come in various forms; ranging from the availability of certain treatments being reduced or withdrawn completely, to reductions in staffing that mean healthcare professionals must ration the time they make available to each patient. As austerity has taken hold, across the United Kingdom (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  8.  25
    Mapping, framing, shaping: a framework for empirical bioethics research projects.Richard Huxtable & Jonathan Ives - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-8.
    Background There is growing interest in the use and incorporation of empirical data in bioethics research. Much of the recent focus has been on specific “empirical bioethics” methodologies, which attempt to integrate the empirical and the normative. Researchers in the field are, however, beginning to explore broader questions, including around acceptable standards of practice for undertaking such research. The framework: In this article, we further widen the focus to consider the overall shape of an empirical bioethics research project. We outline (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  9.  50
    A method of Reflexive Balancing in a Pragmatic, Interdisciplinary and Reflexive Bioethics.Jonathan Ives - 2013 - Bioethics 28 (6):302-312.
    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an ‘abstract’ philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of ‘empirical’ (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  10.  68
    Who's arguing? A call for reflexivity in bioethics.Jonathan Ives & Michael Dunn - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (5):256-265.
    In this paper we set forth what we believe to be a relatively controversial argument, claiming that 'bioethics' needs to undergo a fundamental change in the way it is practised. This change, we argue, requires philosophical bioethicists to adopt reflexive practices when applying their analyses in public forums, acknowledging openly that bioethics is an embedded socio-cultural practice, shaped by the ever-changing intuitions of individual philosophers, which cannot be viewed as a detached intellectual endeavour. This said, we argue that in order (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  11.  21
    Fallacious, misleading and unhelpful: The case for removing ‘systematic review’ from bioethics nomenclature.Giles Birchley & Jonathan Ives - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (6):635-647.
    Attempts to conduct systematic reviews of ethical arguments in bioethics are fundamentally misguided. All areas of enquiry need thorough and informative literature reviews, and efforts to bring transparency and systematic methods to bioethics are to be welcomed. Nevertheless, the raw materials of bioethical articles are not suited to methods of systematic review. The eclecticism of philosophy may lead to suspicion of philosophical methods in bioethics. Because bioethics aims to influence medical and scientific practice it is tempting to adopt scientific language (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  44
    Altruism in organ donation: an unnecessary requirement?: Table 1.Greg Moorlock, Jonathan Ives & Heather Draper - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):134-138.
    Altruism has long been taken to be the guiding principle of ethical organ donation in the UK, and has been used as justification for rejecting or allowing certain types of donation. We argue that, despite this prominent role, altruism has been poorly defined in policy and position documents, and used confusingly and inconsistently. Looking at how the term has been used over recent years allows us to define ‘organ donation altruism’, and comparing this with accounts in the philosophical literature highlights (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  13.  15
    Clinicians and AI use: where is the professional guidance?Helen Smith, John Downer & Jonathan Ives - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    With the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) to healthcare, there is also a need for professional guidance to support its use. New (2022) reports from National Health Service AI Lab & Health Education England focus on healthcare workers’ understanding and confidence in AI clinical decision support systems (AI-CDDSs), and are concerned with developing trust in, and the trustworthiness of these systems. While they offer guidance to aid developers and purchasers of such systems, they offer little specific guidance for the clinical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  43
    Predicting the unpredictable: critical analysis and practical implications of predictive anticipatory activity.Julia A. Mossbridge, Patrizio Tressoldi, Jessica Utts, John A. Ives, Dean Radin & Wayne B. Jonas - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  15.  49
    Methodology, Epistemology, and Empirical Bioethics Research: A Constructive/ist Commentary.Michael Dunn & Jonathan Ives - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):93-95.
  16.  10
    Principles for pandemics: COVID-19 and professional ethical guidance in England and Wales.Richard Huxtable, Jonathan Ives, Giles Birchley, Mari-Rose Kennedy, Peta Coulson-Smith & Helen Smith - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-15.
    BackgroundDuring the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, various professional ethical guidance was issued to (and for) health and social care professionals in England and Wales. Guidance can help to inform and support such professionals and their patients, clients and service users, but a plethora of guidance risked information overload, confusion, and inconsistency. MethodsDuring the early months of the pandemic, we undertook a rapid review, asking: what are the principles adopted by professional ethical guidance in England and Wales for dealing with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  40
    PPI, paradoxes and Plato: who's sailing the ship?: Table 1.Jonathan Ives, Sarah Damery & Sabi Redwod - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):181-185.
    Over the last decade, patient and public involvement (PPI) has become a requisite in applied health research. Some funding bodies demand explicit evidence of PPI, while others have made a commitment to developing PPI in the projects they fund. Despite being commonplace, there remains a dearth of engagement with the ethical and theoretical underpinnings of PPI processes and practices. More specifically, while there is a small (but growing) body of literature examining the effectiveness and impact of PPI, there has been (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  18.  71
    Non-Professional Healthcare Workers and Ethical Obligations to Work during Pandemic Influenza.H. Draper, T. Sorell, J. Ives, S. Damery, S. Greenfield, J. Parry, J. Petts & S. Wilson - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):23-34.
    Most academic papers on ethics in pandemics concentrate on the duties of healthcare professionals. This paper will consider non-professional healthcare workers: do they have a moral obligation to work during an influenza pandemic? If so, is this an obligation that outweighs others they might have, e.g., as parents, and should such an obligation be backed up by the coercive power of law? This paper considers whether non-professional healthcare workers—porters, domestic service workers, catering staff, clerks, IT support workers, etc.—have an obligation (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  19.  15
    Implementation Science and Bioethics: Lessons From European Empirical Bioethics Research?Jonathan Ives, Giles Birchley & Richard Huxtable - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (4):80-82.
    Volume 20, Issue 4, May 2020, Page 80-82.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  47
    Dialysis decisions concerning cognitively impaired adults: a scoping literature review.Jonathan Ives & Jordan A. Parsons - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-17.
    BackgroundChronic kidney disease is a significant cause of global deaths. Those who progress to end-stage kidney disease often commence dialysis as a life-extending treatment. For cognitively impaired patients, the decision as to whether they commence dialysis will fall to someone else. This scoping review was conducted to map existing literature pertaining to how decisions about dialysis are and should be made with, for, and on behalf of adult patients who lack decision-making capacity. In doing so, it forms the basis of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  36
    Clinical ethics: Healthcare workers’ perceptions of the duty to work during an influenza pandemic.S. Damery, H. Draper, S. Wilson, S. Greenfield & J. Ives - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):12-18.
    Healthcare workers are often assumed to have a duty to work, even if faced with personal risk. This is particularly so for professionals. However, the health service also depends on non-professionals, such as porters, cooks and cleaners. The duty to work is currently under scrutiny because of the ongoing challenge of responding to pandemic influenza, where an effective response depends on most uninfected HCWs continuing to work, despite personal risk. This paper reports findings of a survey of HCWs conducted across (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  22.  8
    Adaptable robots, ethics, and trust: a qualitative and philosophical exploration of the individual experience of trustworthy AI.Stephanie Sheir, Arianna Manzini, Helen Smith & Jonathan Ives - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-14.
    Much has been written about the need for trustworthy artificial intelligence (AI), but the underlying meaning of trust and trustworthiness can vary or be used in confusing ways. It is not always clear whether individuals are speaking of a technology’s trustworthiness, a developer’s trustworthiness, or simply of gaining the trust of users by any means. In sociotechnical circles, trustworthiness is often used as a proxy for ‘the good’, illustrating the moral heights to which technologies and developers ought to aspire, at (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  11
    Auditory driving of the autonomic nervous system: Listening to theta-frequency binaural beats post-exercise increases parasympathetic activation and sympathetic withdrawal.Patrick A. McConnell, Brett Froeliger, Eric L. Garland, Jeffrey C. Ives & Gary A. Sforzo - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  65
    IEEN workshop report: aims and methods in interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics.John Owens, Jonathan Ives & Alan Cribb - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (4):157-160.
    Bioethics is a diverse field that accommodates a broad range of perspectives and disciplines. The recent explosion of literature on methods in interdisciplinary and empirical ethics might appear, however, to overshadow the fact that ‘bioethics’ has long been an interdisciplinary field. The Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics Network (IEEN) was established, with funding from the Wellcome Trust, to facilitate critical and constructive discussion around the nature of this disciplinary diversity and shift focus away from the ‘empirical turn’, towards the ongoing development (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25.  13
    Translational bioethics.Jordan A. Parsons, Pamela Cairns & Jonathan Ives - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):173-176.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  24
    Have We Made Progress in Identifying (Surgical) Innovation?Giles Birchley, Richard Huxtable, Jonathan Ives & Jane Blazeby - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (6):25-27.
    Volume 19, Issue 6, June 2019, Page 25-27.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  28
    Jack of all trades, master of none? Challenges facing junior academic researchers in bioethics.Michael C. Dunn, Zeynep Gurtin-Broadbent, Jessica R. Wheeler & Jonathan Ives - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (4):160-163.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28.  45
    Setting standards for empirical bioethics research: a response to Carter and Cribb.Michael Dunn, Jonathan Ives, Bert Molewijk & Jan Schildmann - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):66.
    This paper responds to the commentaries from Stacy Carter and Alan Cribb. We pick up on two main themes in our response. First, we reflect on how the process of setting standards for empirical bioethics research entails drawing boundaries around what research counts as empirical bioethics research, and we discuss whether the standards agreed in the consensus process draw these boundaries correctly. Second, we expand on the discussion in the original paper of the role and significance of the concept of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  20
    Compassionate care during withdrawal of treatment: A secondary analysis of ICU nurses' experiences.Nikolaos Efstathiou & Jonathan Ives - 2018 - Nursing Ethics 25 (8):1075-1086.
    Background:Withdrawal of treatment is a common practice in intensive care units when treatment is considered futile. Compassion is an important aspect of care; however, it has not been explored much within the context of treatment withdrawal in intensive care units.Objectives:The aim was to examine how concepts of compassion are framed, utilised and communicated by intensive care nurses in the context of treatment withdrawal.Design:The study employed a qualitative approach conducting secondary analysis of an original data set. In the primary study, 13 (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  21
    Artificial intelligence in clinical decision‐making: Rethinking personal moral responsibility.Helen Smith, Giles Birchley & Jonathan Ives - 2023 - Bioethics 38 (1):78-86.
    Artificially intelligent systems (AISs) are being created by software developing companies (SDCs) to influence clinical decision‐making. Historically, clinicians have led healthcare decision‐making, and the introduction of AISs makes SDCs novel actors in the clinical decision‐making space. Although these AISs are intended to influence a clinician's decision‐making, SDCs have been clear that clinicians are in fact the final decision‐makers in clinical care, and that AISs can only inform their decisions. As such, the default position is that clinicians should hold responsibility for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  15
    All you Need is Trust? Public Perspectives on Consenting to Participate in Genomic Research in the Sri Lankan District of Colombo.Krishani Jayasinghe, W. A. S. Chamika, Kaushalya Jayaweera, Kalpani Abhayasinghe, Lasith Dissanayake, Athula Sumathipala & Jonathan Ives - 2023 - Asian Bioethics Review 16 (2):281-302.
    Engagement with genomic medicine and research has increased globally during the past few decades, including rapid developments in Sri Lanka. Genomic research is carried out in Sri Lanka on a variety of scales and with different aims and perspectives. However, there are concerns about participants' understanding of genomic research, including the validity of informed consent. This article reports a qualitative study aiming to explore the understanding, knowledge, and attitudes of the Sri Lankan public towards genomic medicine and to inform the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  30
    Hasta la vista baby: why we should dispense of “autonomy” in “autonomous systems”.Helen Smith, Kerstin Eder & Jonathan Ives - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):395-396.
  33.  17
    Methodology and Myopia? Some Praise, a Problem, and a Plea.Jonathan Ives - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (5):46-47.
    In “A Conceptual Model for the Translation of Bioethics Research and Scholarship,” Debra Mathews et al. aim to “begin an important discussion” about how to measure success in bioethics, and in doing so they set out a typology of bioethics research and scholarship with the arguably correct assumption that we cannot evaluate success in bioethics without first understanding what its goals are. I think the authors are correct in their claim that, in the current academic climate, having work in bioethics (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Becoming a father/refusing fatherhood: an empirical bioethics approach to paternal responsibilities and rights.Jonathan Ives, Heather Draper, Helen Pattison & Clare Williams - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (2):75-84.
    In this paper, we present the first stage of an empirical bioethics project exploring the moral sources of paternal responsibilities and rights. In doing so, we present both (1) data on men's normative constructions of fatherhood and (2) the first of a two-stage methodological approach to empirical bioethics. Using data gathered from 12 focus groups run with UK men who have had a variety of different fathering experiences (n = 50), we examine men's perspectives on how paternal responsibilities and rights (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  45
    Should We Reject Donated Organs on Moral Grounds or Permit Allocation Using Non‐Medical Criteria?: A Qualitative Study.Greg Moorlock, Jonathan Ives, Simon Bramhall & Heather Draper - 2015 - Bioethics 30 (4):282-292.
    Conditional and directed deceased organ donations occur when donors attempt to influence the allocation of their donated organs. This can include asking that the organs are given to or withheld from certain types of people, or that they are given to specified individuals. Donations of these types have raised ethical concerns, and have been prohibited in many countries, including the UK. In this article we report the findings from a qualitative study involving interviews with potential donors, potential recipients and transplant (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Does a belief in God lead to moral cowardice?: The difference between courage of moral conviction and acquisition: Ives does a belief in God lead to moral cowardice?Jonathan Ives - 2008 - Think 7 (20):57-68.
    In our seventh and final piece on the theme “Good without God”, Jonathan Ives argues that reliance on God as an external source of moral authority leads to a kind of moral cowardice.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  12
    License to Kill: A New Model for Excusing Medically Assisted Dying?Jonathan Ives & Richard Huxtable - 2015 - In Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Cham: Springer Verlag. pp. 117-136.
    In this chapter, we seek to offer a fresh perspective on whether or not doctors should be “licensed to kill”. As that phrase indicates, we metaphorically refer to the adventures of fictional spy James Bond, although we hope, in doing so, that readers will not think that we are belittling the serious topic with which the chapter is concerned. Having surveyed some of the familiar arguments for and against allowing medically-assisted dying, we advance a new proposal, which seeks to strike (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  22
    Conceptualising Surgical Innovation: An Eliminativist Proposal.Giles Birchley, Jonathan Ives, Richard Huxtable & Jane Blazeby - 2020 - Health Care Analysis 28 (1):73-97.
    Improving surgical interventions is key to improving outcomes. Ensuring the safe and transparent translation of such improvements is essential. Evaluation and governance initiatives, including the IDEAL framework and the Macquarie Surgical Innovation Identification Tool have begun to address this. Yet without a definition of innovation that allows non-surgeons to identify when it is occurring, these initiatives are of limited value. A definition seems elusive, so we undertook a conceptual study of surgical innovation. This indicated common conceptual areas in discussions of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  29
    On classifying the field of medical ethics.Kristine Bærøe, Jonathan Ives, Martine de Vries & Jan Schildmann - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):30.
    In 2014, the editorial board of BMC Medical Ethics came together to devise sections for the journal that would give structure to the journal help ensure that authors’ research is matched to the most appropriate editors and help readers to find the research most relevant to them. The editorial board decided to take a practical approach to devising sections that dealt with the challenges of content management. After that, we started thinking more theoretically about how one could go about classifying (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  24
    Medical education and patients' responsibilities: back to the future?H. Draper, J. Ives, J. Parle & N. Ross - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (2):116-119.
    Medical student learning is dependent on an unwritten agreement between patients and the medical profession, in which students “practise” upon real patients in order that, when they are doctors, those same patients will benefit from the doctors’ skills. Given the increasing propensity for patients to refuse to take part in such learning, there is a danger that doctors will qualify without being truly competent. As patients, we must all ask ourselves, when asked to take part in medical teaching: if this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  59
    A Rejoinder on the Constitution.J. Moss Ives - 1938 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 13 (2):302-305.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  48
    Catholic Antecedents of Maryland Liberties.J. Moss Ives - 1932 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 7 (2):181-197.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  65
    IEEN workshop report: Teaching and learning in interdisciplinary and empirical ethics.Jonathan Ives, John Owens & Alan Cribb - 2013 - Clinical Ethics 8 (2-3):70-74.
    Bioethics is an interdisciplinary field that accommodates a broad range of perspectives and disciplines. This inherent diversity sets a number of challenges for both teachers and students of bioethics, notably in respect to the appropriate aims and methods of bioethics education, standards and criteria for evaluating performance and disciplinary identity. The Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics Network (IEEN) was established, with funding from the Wellcome Trust, to facilitate critical and constructive discussion about the ongoing development of bioethics as an evolving field (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  23
    L.I.F.E. and D.E.A.T.H.Jonathan Ives - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (3):257-259.
    In this short, rhetorical article, I offer a thought experiment that seeks to make an analogy between ‘life’ and ‘disease’. This article was written whilst under the influence of Nietzsche, and I hope that readers will not mistake the polemical style and the occasional nod towards humour for flippancy. This is a serious subject, and this article attempts to ask, inexplicitly, a serious question. If we do suspend our subjective value judgements about life, and strip away what might be considered (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  59
    Roger Williams, Apostle of Religious Bigotry.J. Moss Ives - 1931 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 6 (3):478-492.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  54
    St. Thomas Aquinas and the Constitution.J. Moss Ives - 1937 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 12 (4):567-586.
  47.  36
    Who gets the gametes? An argument for a points system for fertility patients.Simon Jenkins, Jonathan Ives, Sue Avery & Heather Draper - 2017 - Bioethics 32 (1):16-26.
    This paper argues that the convention of allocating donated gametes on a ‘first come, first served’ basis should be replaced with an allocation system that takes into account more morally relevant criteria than waiting time. This conclusion was developed using an empirical bioethics methodology, which involved a study of the views of 18 staff members from seven U.K. fertility clinics, and 20 academics, policy-makers, representatives of patient groups, and other relevant professionals, on the allocation of donated sperm and eggs. Against (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  20
    Kant, curves and medical learning practice: a reply to Le Morvan and Stock.J. Ives - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (2):119-122.
    In a recent paper published in the Journal of Medical Ethics, Le Morvan and Stock claim that the kantian ideal of treating people always as ends in themselves and never merely as a means is in direct and insurmountable conflict with the current medical practice of allowing practitioners at the bottom of their “learning curve” to “practise their skills” on patients. In this response, I take up the challenge they issue is and try to reconcile this conflict. The kantian ideal (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Protocol for a scoping review to understand what is known about how GPs make decisions with, for and on behalf of patients who lack capacity.Simon Jack Ogden, Richard Huxtable & Jonathan Ives - 2020 - BMJ Open 10.
    General Practitioners (GPs) and allied healthcare professionals working in primary care are regularly required to make decisions with, for and on behalf of patients who lack capacity. In England and Wales, these decisions are made for incapacitated adult patients under the Mental Capacity Act 2005, which primarily requires that decisions are made in the patient’s ‘best interests’. Regarding children, decisions are also made in their best interests but are done so under the Children Act 1989, which places paramount importance on (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  20
    IEEN workshop report: Professionalism in interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics.John Owens, Jonathan Ives & Alan Cribb - 2014 - Clinical Ethics 9 (4):109-112.
    The Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics Network was established in 2012 with funding from the Wellcome Trust in order to facilitate critical and constructive discussion around the nature of the disciplinary diversity within bioethics and to consider the ongoing development of bioethics as an evolving field of interdisciplinary study. In April 2013, the Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics Network organized a workshop at the Centre for Public Policy Research, King’s College London, which discussed the nature and possibility of professionalism within interdisciplinary and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 55