Results for 'Adam Wodeham'

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  1.  16
    Adam Wodeham: An Introduction to His Life and Writings.William J. Courtenay - 1978 - Brill.
    INTRODUCTION Adam Wodeham, OFM (d.) has received only passing mention in the textbooks on the history of medieval philosophy. Although recognized as a major ...
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  2. Adam Wodeham on First and Second Intentions.Katherine Tachau - 1980 - Cahiers de l'Institut du Moyen-Âge Grec Et Latin 35:29-55.
  3.  21
    Adam Wodeham's Anti-Aristotelian Anti-Atomism.Norman Kretzmann - 1984 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 1 (4):381 - 398.
  4.  6
    Adam Wodeham.Stephen E. Lahey - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 20--24.
  5.  18
    Adam Wodeham.Richard P. Desharnais - 1980 - New Scholasticism 54 (2):235-237.
  6. Adam de Wodeham, Tractatus de Indivisibilibus a Critical Edition.Adam Wodeham & Rega Wood - 1988
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  7.  6
    Adam Wodeham, Lectura Secunda in Librum Primum Sententiarum, Eds. R. Wood & G. Gal, St. Bonaventure, NY: St. Bonaventure University, 1990. Albert the Great, Alberti Opera Omnia, Ed. A. Borgnet, Paris: Vives, 1890-1895. [REVIEW]Omnia Opera Ysaac - 2002 - In Henrik Lagerlund & Mikko Yrjonsuri (eds.), Emotions and Choice From Boethius to Descartes. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 299.
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  8. Facts Vs. Things: Adam Wodeham and the Later Medieval Debate About Objects of Judgment.Susan Brower-Toland - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):597-642.
    Commentators have long agreed that Wodeham’s account of objects of judgment is highly innovative, but they have continued to disagree about its proper interpretation. Some read him as introducing items that are merely supervenient on (and nothing in addition to) Aristotelian substances and accidents; others take him to be introducing a new type of entity in addition to substances and accidents—namely, abstract states of affairs. In this paper, I argue that both interpretations are mistaken: the entities Wodeham introduces (...)
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  9. Peter Auriol on the Intuitive Cognition of Nonexistents. Revisiting the Charge of Skepticism in Walter Chatton and Adam Wodeham.Han Thomas Adriaenssen - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 5 (1):151-180.
    This paper looks at the critical reception of two central claims of Peter Auriol’s theory of cognition: the claim that the objects of cognition have an apparent or objective being that resists reduction to the real being of objects, and the claim that there may be natural intuitive cognitions of nonexistent objects. These claims earned Auriol the criticism of his fellow Franciscans, Walter Chatton and Adam Wodeham. According to them, the theory of apparent being was what had led (...)
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  10.  13
    Adam Wodeham on the Intentionality of Cognitions.Elizabeth Karger - 2001 - In Dominik Perler (ed.), Ancient and Medieval Theories of Intentionality. Brill. pp. 76--283.
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  11.  19
    Walter Chatton and Adam Wodeham on Divine Simplicity and Trinitarian Relations.John T. Slotemaker - 2015 - Quaestio 15:689-697.
    The present paper examines the trinitarian theology of Adam Wodeham and Walter Chatton through an examination of the filioque, i.e., the procession of the Holy Spirit from the Father and Son. The paper argues that the strong emphasis on divine simplicity that emerged in the early fourteenth century had a subtle influence on how Wodeham and Chatton understood the intra-trinitarian distinctions between the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
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  12.  17
    The Wodeham Edition: Adam Wodeham's Lectura Secunda.Rega Wood - 1991 - Franciscan Studies 51 (1):103-115.
  13.  52
    The Critical Edition of Adam Wodeham'Slectura Secunda. [REVIEW]Simo Knuuttila - 1993 - Synthese 96 (1):155-159.
  14.  37
    God, Indivisibles, and Logic in the Later Middle Ages: Adam Wodeham's Response to Henry of Harclay.Edith Dudley Sylla - 1998 - Medieval Philosophy and Theology 7 (1):69-87.
    As its modern edition appears in the Synthese Historical Library, Adam WodehamThis book is an important contribution to the history of philosophy.It will be of interest to all medievalists, particularly to those concerned with medieval science, philosophy, and logic. Theologians and historians of mathematics will also find it useful.Whether charity or [any] other incorruptible form is composed of indivisible forms.Because this difficulty is the same for all composite divisible things, whether intensive or extensive, which are of one and the (...)
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  15. Anselm and the Background to Adam Wodeham's Theory of Abstract and Concrete Terms.Paul Vincent Spade - 1988 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 43 (2):261-271.
  16.  28
    How It Played in the Rue de Fouarre_: The Reception of Adam Wodeham's Theory of the _Complexe Significable in the Arts Faculty at Paris in the Mid-Fourteenth Century.Jack Zupko - 1994 - Franciscan Studies 54 (1):211-225.
  17.  90
    William of Ockham, Walter Chatton and Adam Wodeham on the Objects of Knowledge and Belief.Elizabeth Karger - 1995 - Vivarium 33 (2):171-196.
  18.  19
    Two Questions on the Continuum: Walter Chatton , O.F.M. And Adam Wodeham, O.F.M.John E. Murdoch & Edward A. Synan - 1966 - Franciscan Studies 26 (1):212-288.
  19. God, Indivisibles, and Logic in the Later Middle Ages: Adam Wodeham’s Response to Henry of Harclay.Edith Sylla - 1998 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 7 (1):69-87.
     
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  20. Chapitres «Jean Duns Scot»(Pp. 35-55),«Adam Wodeham»(Pp. 57-88),«Nicole Oresme»(Pp. 221-279),«Jean de Ripa»(Pp. 281-294). [REVIEW]Jean Celeyrette & Edmond Mazet - 2005 - In J. Biard & J. Celeyrette (eds.), De la Théologie aux Mathématiques: L'infini au Xive Siècle. Belles Lettres.
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  21.  35
    Review: The Critical Edition of Adam Wodeham's "Lectura Secunda". [REVIEW]Simo Knuuttila - 1993 - Synthese 96 (1):155 - 159.
  22.  6
    Emotion and Cognition in Later Medieval Philosophy: The Case of Adam Wodeham.Martin Picleavé - 2012 - In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 94-115.
  23. Lectura Secunda in Librum Primum Sententiarum.Adam Wodeham, Gedeon Gál & Rega Wood - 1990 - Franciscan Institute, St. Bonaventure University.
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  24. Lectura Secunda in Librum Primum Sententiarum.Adam of WODEHAM - 1990
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  25.  17
    Adam de Wodeham.John T. Slotemaker - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  26.  29
    Adam of Wodeham's Question on the "Complexe Significabile" as the Immediate Object of Scientific Knowledge.Gedeon Gál - 1977 - Franciscan Studies 37 (1):66-102.
  27. Lectura Secunda in Librum Primum Sententiarum.Adam de Wodeham & Rega Wood - 1993 - Synthese 96 (1):155-159.
  28.  18
    Lectura Secunda, Vols. 1-3.Adam de Wodeham, Rega Wood & Gedeon Gal - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (4):588-594.
  29.  9
    Adam De Wodeham. Tractatus de Indivisibilibus: A Critical Edition. Introduction, Translation, and Textual Notes by Rega Wood. Synthese Historical Library, Volume 31. Dordrecht, Boston, London: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1988. Pp. Vii + 333. ISBN 90-277-2424-5. £74.00. [REVIEW]A. Molland - 1989 - British Journal for the History of Science 22 (4):464-465.
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  30.  2
    La teoría de Adam of Wodeham sobre la percepción no verídica de círculos suspendidos en el aire.Lydia Deni Gamboa - 2019 - Perseitas 8:295.
    Cuando vemos una vara moviéndose en círculos, aparece un círculo en el aire desde la perspectiva de la primera persona. Esta ilusión fue explicada por Peter Auriole mediante la idea según la cual, en tal caso, existe una entidad aparente en nuestra visión, la cual es la causa directa de tal ilusión. Wodeham presenta una explicación diferente pero similar a la de Ockham. Para él, cuando un agente cree que existe un círculo suspendido, él mismo forma una inferencia cuya (...)
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  31.  7
    El conocimiento intuitivo como garante epistémico según William of Ockham y Adam of Wodeham.Lydia Deni Gamboa - 2018 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 60:47-66.
    Adam of Wodeham and William of Ockham ascribe different properties to intuitive apprehensions. The properties that Wodeham ascribes to intuitive cognitions concur with his reading of one of the four scenarios that Ockham proposes in order to test the idea that an intuitive apprehension serves as an epistemic warrant. In this article, I explain that Wodeham avoids skepticism through his account of intuitive cognitions; even though, like Ockham, he accepts that God can cause us to undergo (...)
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  32. Wodeham Against Chatton: The Second Part of the Way Towards Complexe Significabilia.Ernesto Perini-Santos - 2019 - Medioevo 44 (1):99-121.
    Complexe significabilia are the significate of whole sentences, irreducible to what is signified by categorematic sub-sentential components. It has been propounded firstly by Adam Wodeham. Wodeham construes his argument for the postulation of complexe significabilia as a middle way between William of Ockham and Walter Chatton. According to Wodeham, Ockham’s view implies a reflexive theory of mental acts, which goes against the phenomenology of the act of assent. Moreover, it leads to an anti-realist epistemology. We need (...)
     
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  33.  6
    Tractatus de Indivisibilibus by Adam de Wodeham; Rega Wood. [REVIEW]André Goddu - 1989 - Isis 80:691-693.
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  34. Intuitive Cognition and Inner Experience in Wodeham, Adam. 2.Me Reina - 1986 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 41 (2):19-49.
  35.  8
    The Relation-Theory of Mental Acts: Durand of St.-Pourcain on the Ontological Status of Mental Acts.Peter Hartman - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 7 (1).
    The relation-theory of mental acts proposes that a mental act is a kind of relative entity founded upon the mind and directed at the object of perception or thought. While most medieval philosophers recognized that there is something importantly relational about thought, they nevertheless rejected the view that mental acts are wholly relations. Rather, the dominant view was that a mental act is either in whole or part an Aristotelian quality added to the mind upon which such a relation to (...)
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  36.  48
    Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Review).Kevin White - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 316-317.
    “Studies on the emotions became popular in the analytically oriented philosophy of mind in the 1980s” , the author begins, but the status of emotion as reason’s rival or complement in the directing of human nature is, of course, of perennial interest to philosophy per se. True, the topic has acquired a certain prominence in recent decades, and this has led to useful historical investigations, although, as the author says, many more of them have been on emotions in ancient than (...)
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  37. John Buridan and the Problems of Dualism in the Early Fourteenth Century.Henrik Lagerlund - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (4):369-387.
    : In this paper I argue that the famous problems of dualism between mind (soul) and body, that is, the problems of interaction and unification, concerned philosophers already in a medieval Aristotelian tradition. The problems, although traceable earlier, become particularly visible after William Ockham in the early fourteenth century, and in formulating his own position on the animal and human souls I argue that Buridan realized these problems and laid down the only views on the soul he thought to be (...)
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  38.  16
    Himmlische Sätze: Die Beweisbarkeit von Glaubenss'tzen nach Wilhelm von Ockham.Martin Lenz - 1998 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 3 (1):99-120.
    In reply to the question whether articles of faith can be demonstrated, William of Ockham articulated a peculiar thesis: Even though it is impossible to prove articles of faith in this life, the blessed in heaven could demonstrate our creditive propositions. In contrast to traditional views, William held that both conclusions drawn in heaven and conclusions drawn in this life are subject to the same criteria. This assumption led to a controversy between William's contemporaries, namely, Walter Chatton and Adam (...)
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  39.  79
    Supposition and Predication in Medieval Trinitarian Logic.Simo Knuuttila - 2013 - Vivarium 51 (1-4):260-274.
    Many fourteenth-century logicians took affirmative propositions to maintain that the subject term and the predicate term stand or supposit for the same. This is called the identity theory of predication by historians and praedicatio identica by Paul of Venice and others. The identity theory of predication was an important part of early fourteenth-century Trinitarian discussions as well, but what was called praedicatio identica by Duns Scotus and his followers in this context was something different. After some remarks on Scotus’s view (...)
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  40. Onnipotenza divina e futuri contingenti nel XIV secolo.Eugenio Randi - 1990 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 1 (2):605-630.
    L'A. analizza un tema fondamentale nella «querelle» sui futuri contingenti del sec. XIV, cioè il concetto di potentia absoluta di Dio. Il tema fu interpretato secondo due opposte visioni: l'interpetazione «operativa» intendeva la potentia absoluta come un potere straordinario ed «eccezionale», mentre l'interpretazione «logica», sostenuta ad esempio da Bradwardine, riteneva la potentia absoluta una mera descrizione di possibilità teoriche. L'analisi di questo problema è condotta in base alle teorie di Giovanni Buckingham e di Giovanni di Mirecourt, con riferimenti alla posizione (...)
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  41.  2
    Mind and Knowledge.Robert Pasnau (ed.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    The third volume of The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts will allow scholars and students access, for the first time in English, to major texts that form the debate over mind and knowledge at the center of medieval philosophy. Beginning with thirteenth-century attempts to classify the soul's powers and to explain the mind's place within the soul, the volume proceeds systematically to consider the scope of human knowledge and the role of divine illumination, intentionality and mental representation, and attempts (...)
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  42.  57
    On the Intentionality of the Emotions (and of Other Appetitive Acts).Martin Pickavé - 2010 - Quaestio 10:45-63.
    In recent philosophical debates about the nature of human emotions the intentionality of emotions plays a key part. The article explores how medieval philosophers of the late 13th and early 14th centuries accounted for the fact that our emotions, such as love, hate, anger and the like, are intentional mental states, states that are ‘of’ or ‘about something’. Since medieval philosophers agree that emotions are essentially movements of the appetitive powers, the intentionality of emotions is part of the broader problem (...)
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  43.  14
    Le langage mental en discussion: 1320-1335.Claude Panaccio - 1996 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 3:323-339.
    Guillaume d'Ockham fut l'initiateur principal d'une approche sémantique aux phénomènes cognitifs: la pensée, pour lui, est un discours intérieur et il propose de l'analyser systématiquement à travers les catégories de la grammaire et celles — surtout — de la théorie nouvelle des « propriétés des termes » . On examine ici comment cette suggestion fut reçue chez les philosophes anglais du temps d'Ockham, en particulier: Gauthier Chatton, Hugues Lawton, le Pseudo-Campsall, Crathorn, Robert Holkot et Adam Wodeham. William of (...)
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  44. Emotions and Cognitions. Fourteenth-Century Discussions on the Passions of the Soul.Dominik Perler - 2005 - Vivarium 43 (2):250-274.
    Medieval philosophers clearly recognized that emotions are not simply "raw feelings" but complex mental states that include cognitive components. They analyzed these components both on the sensory and on the intellectual level, paying particular attention to the different types of cognition that are involved. This paper focuses on William Ockham and Adam Wodeham, two fourteenth-century authors who presented a detailed account of "sensory passions" and "volitional passions". It intends to show that these two philosophers provided both a structural (...)
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  45.  11
    Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Review). [REVIEW]Kevin White - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):316-317.
    “Studies on the emotions became popular in the analytically oriented philosophy of mind in the 1980s” , the author begins, but the status of emotion as reason’s rival or complement in the directing of human nature is, of course, of perennial interest to philosophy per se. True, the topic has acquired a certain prominence in recent decades, and this has led to useful historical investigations, although, as the author says, many more of them have been on emotions in ancient than (...)
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  46.  8
    Emotions and Cognitions.Dominik Perler - unknown
    Medieval philosophers clearly recognized that emotions are not simply "raw feelings" but complex mental states that include cognitive components. They analyzed these components both on the sensory and on the intellectual level, paying particular attention to the different types of cognition that are involved. This paper focuses on William Ockham and Adam Wodeham, two fourteenth-century authors who presented a detailed account of "sensory passions" and "volitional passions". It intends to show that these two philosophers provided both a structural (...)
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  47. The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts, 3.R. Pasnau - 2002 - In Robert Pasnau (ed.), Mind and Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    The third volume of The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts will allow scholars and students access in English, to major texts that form the debate over mind and knowledge at the center of medieval philosophy. Beginning with thirteenth-century attempts to classify the soul's powers and to explain the mind's place within the soul, the volume proceeds systematically to consider the scope of human knowledge and the role of divine illumination, intentionality and mental representation, and attempts to identify the object (...)
     
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  48. The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts: Volume 3, Mind and Knowledge.Robert Pasnau (ed.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    The third volume of The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts will allow scholars and students access in English, to major texts that form the debate over mind and knowledge at the center of medieval philosophy. Beginning with thirteenth-century attempts to classify the soul's powers and to explain the mind's place within the soul, the volume proceeds systematically to consider the scope of human knowledge and the role of divine illumination, intentionality and mental representation, and attempts to identify the object (...)
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  49.  18
    Gerald Odonis' Tractatus de Suppositionibus : What is Suppositio Communicabilis?Stephen Brown - 2009 - In Lambertus Marie de Rijk, William Duba & Christopher David Schabel (eds.), Vivarium. Brill. pp. 205-220.
    The Tractatus de suppositionibus, which is cited by Gerald Odonis in his commentary on the Sentences, probably dates from ca. 1315-25. In the Sentences commentary he refers to his treatment of 'suppositio communicabilis' and its species, indicating a type of supposition whose language seems new. This article attempts to find a source for it in contemporary authors and arrives at the conclusion that 'communicabilis' is simply a synonym for 'personalis', the most common form of supposition according to Odonis.
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  50.  15
    Lectura Secunda in Librum Primum Sententiarum.Michael W. Tkacz - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (2):399-400.
    In his monumental History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages, Etienne Gilson devotes only one paragraph in his chapter on fourteenth-century nominalism to Adam of Wodeham. He admits that this is partly due to the fact that little is known of Adam's philosophical views except that he is generally considered an Ockhamist. Gilson's treatment reflects the once widely held view that Adam's contributions to the history of philosophy were limited to expositions of William of Ockham. (...)
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