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History/traditions: Pain

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  1. Sharing Pain: A Hybrid Expressivist Account.Jada Wiggleton-Little - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    When one communicates that they are in pain, it is often assumed that the speaker is providing an assertion or report. Call this the cognitivist stance of pain utterances. Nevertheless, many sentential pain utterances seem to have both assertive and imperatival communicative content in virtue of expressing both the speaker's pain belief and the pain experience, respectively. I call this view hybrid expressivism about pain. In this paper, I take the imperativist idea of pain seriously and show that, via an (...)
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  2. How We Keep Caring While Walking Through Our Pain.Ola Ziara - forthcoming - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics.
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  3. Pain, suffering, and the time of life: a buddhist philosophical analysis.Sean M. Smith - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-22.
    In this paper, I explore how our experience of pain and suffering structure our experience over time. I argue that pain and suffering are not as easily dissociable, in living and in conceptual analysis, as philosophers have tended to think. Specifically, I do not think that there is only a contingent connection between physical pain and psychological suffering. Rather, physical pain is partially constitutive of existential suffering. My analysis is informed by contemporary thinking about pain and suffering as well as (...)
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  4. Pleasure, Pain, and Pluralism about Well-Being.Eden Lin - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly.
    Pluralistic theories of well-being might appear unable to accommodate just how important pleasure and pain are to well-being. Intuitively, there is a finite limit to how well your life can go for you if it goes badly enough hedonically (e.g. because you never feel any pleasure and you spend two years in unrelenting agony). But if there is some basic good distinct from pleasure, as any pluralistic theory must claim, then it seems that you could be made arbitrarily well off (...)
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  5. Indispensabilité et réalisme restreint : réponse à Nicolas Pain.Fabrice Pataut - 2012 - RÉPHA, revue étudiante de philosophie analytique 6:33-38.
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  6. Many-Faced Pain, or What Pain as a Social and Cultural Phenomenon Tells Us on Our Mind Constitution. Review: Schleifer R. (2014) Pain and Suffering, New York and London: Routledge.T. V. Weiser - 2017 - Sociology of Power 29 (3):304-315.
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  7. Consciousness in Pain: A New Model for Analysing Its Transformation.Roni Naor-Hofri - 2024 - Philosophies 9 (1):12.
    When looking for an account that explains how pain changes consciousness, one finds that most studies in the phenomenology of pain focus either on the outcome of the change, or on how it affects the self, as a conscious object, and the self’s experiences in the world of objects. This paper focuses on the mechanism of consciousness, exploring the nature of the change that pain creates in consciousness and how exactly that change occurs. The paper provides a systematic, phenomenological inquiry (...)
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  8. Restorative Pain: A new vision of punishment.Theo Gavrielides (ed.) - 2013 - Furnham: Ashgate.
    The chapter revisits the relationship between restorative justice and punishment through the eyes of Classical Greek philosophy and tragedy, the School of Collectivists, and contemporary thinkers. The extant literature sees restorative justice either as alternative punishment or an alternative to punishment. This chapter puts forward the notion of restorative punishment by deconstructing the concept of pain, and by reconstructing a new vision through the notion of catharsis. The chapter then takes a bold step in proposing a philosophical framework to justify (...)
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  9. Expanding the notion of mechanism to further understanding of biopsychosocial disorders? Depression and medically-unexplained pain as cases in point.Jan Pieter Konsman - 2024 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 103 (C):123-136.
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  10. “There is Nothing Fun About Pain”: A Critical Phenomenology of Games for Chronic Pain.Michelle Charette - 2023 - Philosophy and Technology 37 (1):1-23.
    This article examines the gamification of health applications designed to help patients manage chronic pain. Through description of one such program and in-depth interviewing, I describe why gamified pain applications are appealing to patients living with chronic pain. Individuals living with chronic pain are especially disposed to try novel pain management technologies due to the in-control and out-of-control paradox of pain (Leder, 2016). These applications are seductive not only due to this embodied phenomenon, but also because gamification taps into the (...)
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  11. The sanguinary dimension of jealousy: pain, grief and unbending certainty.Mario Orozco Guzman - 2019 - In Hada Soria Escalante (ed.), Rethinking the relation between women and psychoanalysis: loss, mourning, and the feminine. Lexington Books.
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  12. Bring the Pain? An Examination of Human Suffering in Sartre’s Being and NothingnessRoss A. Jackson & Brian L. Heath - 2024 - Open Journal of Philosophy 14 (1):18-37.
    Human suffering is a complex phenomenon that can manifest physically or psychologically. As the negative valence of affective phenomena, with the positive being pleasure or happiness, human suffering could easily be interpreted as something to avoid. Sartre explored existential aspects of human suffering in Being and Nothingness. Examining each occurrence of the word suffering in that work provides a basis for understanding the roles Sartre assigned to it within the human experience and consequently provides a more nuanced appreciation of this (...)
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  13. The history of the concept of pain: how the experts came to be out of touch with the folk.Benjamin Goldberg, Kevin Reuter, Justin Sytsma, Kristien Hens & Andreas De Block - 2023 - In Advances in Experimental Philosophy of Science. pp. 173-190.
    In this chapter we consider the tension between how pain researchers today typically define pains and the dominant, ordinary conception of pain. While both philosophers and pain scientists define pains as experiences, taking this to correspond with the ordinary understanding, recent empirical evidence indicates that laypeople tend to think of pains as qualities of bodily states. How did this divide come about? To answer, we sketch the historical origins of the concept of pain in Western medicine, providing evidence that during (...)
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  14. Practical Muslim Theodicy: A Ghazalian Perspective on Emotional Pain.Joel Richmond - 2023 - In Muhammad U. Faruque & Mohammed Rustom (eds.), From the divine to the human: contemporary Islamic thinkers on evil, suffering, and the global pandemic. Routledge.
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  15. The night is normal: a guide through spiritual pain.Alicia Britt Chole - 2023 - Carol Stream, Illinois: Tyndale House Publishers.
    It's unnerving, isn't it? When our faith feels ungrounded, untethered... unreal. When our certainty is adrift, as though an undercurrent has pulled us away from shore into the deep, into the darkness. This is disillusionment. This is spiritual pain. And if this is you, please know that you are not alone. (And you are not as far away from safety as you may feel or fear.) Though faith shines best in full sun, it grows depth in the dark. The night (...)
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  16. The Shape of Power and of Pain in Game of Thrones.Patricia McManus - 2023 - Utopian Studies 34 (2):319-334.
    Abstractabstract:To obliterate history from any narrative model, you must flatten that model so that no temporal change is possible. One way to do this is to remove instances of conflict, another is to render conflict perpetual. The latter is the move made by Game of Thrones, a television drama treated here as an antiutopian text, a model of twenty-first century epic fantasy in its surrender not of morality but of historicity.
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  17. Pain and sympathy..John N. McCormick - 1907 - [n.p.]:
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  18. “It is difficult for us to treat their pain”. Health professionals’ perceptions of Somali pastoralists in the context of pain management: a conceptual model.Eleonore Https://Orcidorg Baum, Sied Https://Orcidorg Abdi, Peter Https://Orcidorg van Eeuwijk, Nicole Https://Orcidorg Probst-Hensch, Jakob Https://Orcidorg Zinsstag, Rea Https://Orcidorg Tschopp & Birgit Vosseler - forthcoming - .
    Pain is one of the most neglected areas of care in sub-Saharan Africa. Access to adequate pain management is important, especially in marginalised populations, such as pastoralists. Little is known about health professionals’ perceptions of pain-related care for Somali pastoralists. This study seeks to understand health professionals’ perceptions of Somali pastoralists in the context of pain management in Eastern Ethiopia. Within the scope of this qualitative multicentre study, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 17 health professionals (mainly nurses) experienced in treating (...)
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  19. The mystery of pain.James Hinton - 1914 - New York,: M. Kennerley.
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  20. ‘Pain is the Great Connector’ : Nature and Womanhood in the Songs of Chelsea Wolfe.Therese Hallberg - unknown
    This thesis explores the conception and embodiment of nature in the songs of American folkmusic/doom metal singer-songwriter Chelsea Wolfe. Through the theoretical perspective of ecocritical feminism that emphasise the interconnectedness of the subjugation of women and the environment, this study delves into how Wolfe’s songs relate to nature and the feminine in relation to voice and song. I employ the methodology of Critical Musicology as described by Lawrence Kramer, to provide an understanding of the relationship between song, text and language. (...)
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  21. Expecting pain.Frederique de Vignemont - 2023 - Synthese 202 (5):1-18.
    There is a large amount of evidence of placebo and nocebo effects showing that one’s expectation of a forthcoming pain can influence the subsequent experience of pain. Here I shall not discuss the implications of these findings for the nature of pain, but focus instead on the nature of pain anticipation itself. This notion indeed remains poorly analysed and it is unclear what type of anticipatory state it involves. I shall argue that there is more to pain anticipation than a (...)
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  22. La masculinité grotesque au dix-huitième siècle : Ingenious Pain d’Andrew Miller et The Giant, O’Brien d’Hilary Mantel.Chantel Lavoie - 2022 - Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 41:183.
    This paper considers masculinity in two twentieth-century historical novels set in the eighteenth century: Andrew Miller’s Ingenious Pain (1997) and Hilary Mantel’s The Giant, O’Brien (1998). It argues that both novels create protagonists who embody masculine-coded attributes, including resistance to pain and bodily size and strength, and that, in both novels, earning potential is concomitant with such attributes. Complicating matters, however, the very exaggeration of stereotypical masculine characteristics in these texts causes each man to seem something other and less than (...)
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  23. Evaluation of Pain in the Critical Care Unit Patients Who Had Intubated and Sedated.Fatma Güçlü & Serap Ünsar - 2023 - In Kıymet Tunca Çalıyurt (ed.), Integrity, Transparency and Corruption in Healthcare & Research on Health, Volume II. Springer Nature Singapore. pp. 201-215.
    This study was planned as cross-sectional, single group, preliminary, and final test in order to evaluate the pain behaviors and the effecting factors during the aspiration and positioning of intubated and sedated patients who received treatment in the adult intensive care unit. The study was carried out with 91 patients, who were under treatment in the 3rd level intensive care unit of a state hospital in Edirne between the dates of 13.11.2017 and 12.01.2018. The data were collected by patient information (...)
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  24. Vous reprendrez bien un peu de pain sec?Julien Rodriguez - 2010 - L’Enseignement Philosophique 60 (3):39-43.
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  25. “But I Am Afflicted” Attending to Persons in Pain and Modern Health Care.Sarah Jean Barton & Brett McCarty - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):177-182.
    Over one in five adults in the United States and around the world are estimated to live with chronic pain. How are we to attend well to persons living with pain? This is a difficult, pressing question for both healthcare institutions and Christian communities, and it is only made more complex both by the contemporary opioid crisis and by how experiences of pain and addiction are shaped in the American context by race, gender, and class. Attending faithfully to persons in (...)
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  26. Faithfully Describing and Responding to Addiction and Pain: Christian “Homefulness” and Desire.John Swinton & Emmy Yang - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):256-266.
    This investigation develops in three steps. First, we seek to complexify the opioid crisis in a way that helps us to see how the issues of misguided desire and misplaced attachments are fundamentally important for a theological account of opioid addiction.1 Second, acknowledging the connections between pain and opioid addiction, we explore some of the ways in which our understanding of pain can influence our understanding of and responses to opioid use. Finally, we offer some tentative reflections on the theological (...)
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  27. Reclaiming Broken Bodies (or, This Is Gonna Hurt Some): Pain, Healing, and the Opioid Crisis.Joel James Shuman - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):235-243.
    I argue here that the ways we experience, think about, and treat pain are bound up with sociocultural and technological phenomena that shape our desires and expectations. I propose a way of imagining caring for and offering healing to those who suffer pain informed by the Christian theological tradition. This way does not aspire to replace the care and healing made possible by modern medicine, but rather to place it within the common life of a community of mutual love, hospitality, (...)
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  28. Suffering Illness as an Ascetic: Lessons for Women in Pain.Devan Stahl - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):244-255.
    Women’s pain remains underappreciated, undertheorized, and undertreated in both medicine and theology. The ascetic practices of women in pain, however, can help Christians understand and navigate their own pain and suffering, particularly because they are experienced in the context of chronic illness and disability. In what follows, I argue that Christians would do better to view the pain that accompanies disability and chronic illness as a potential resource for spiritual practice rather than an example of sin or evil. I begin (...)
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  29. Responding Wisely to Persistent Pain: Insights from Patristic Theology and Clinical Experience.Farr A. Curlin - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):196-206.
    For most of the past generation, clinicians have been taught to treat patients' pain until the patient says it is relieved. The opioid crisis has forced both clinicians and patients to reconsider that approach. This essay considers how Christians in particular might assume and seek to overcome their experiences of persistent pain. Wise and faithful responses to pain, especially chronic pain, can take their bearings from how early Christians made sense of the place of both medicine and suffering in a (...)
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  30. Responding to People in Pain with Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park.Jaime Konerman-Sease - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):207-220.
    Eliminating pain is problematic when it comes to caring for people with disabilities or chronic pain. This paper locates the drive to completely eliminate pain as a project of the Enlightenment and contrasts it with the tradition of interpreting suffering throughout the Christian tradition. I introduce Jane Austen’s novel Mansfield Park as a way to continue the tradition of interpretative suffering after the Enlightenment. Using textual analysis of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, I demonstrate how the novel’s heroine, Fanny Price, is (...)
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  31. Palliative care and pain management : resources for direct care providers.Amy C. Stevens, Anne-Marie Barron & Patricia N. Rissmiller - 2010 - In Sandra L. Friedman & David T. Helm (eds.), End-of-life care for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.
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  32. Reshaping [Your] Reality. [2] The mental image of pain - from imagination, sensation to reality.Any Docu Axelerad - 2022 - Dialogo 8 (2):44-49.
    Sensory-perceptive activity expresses the attributes of real objects and provides information connected to both external and internal reality. Perception helps us embed the information taken from sensations, helping us form the perceptive image that must be completed by each individual in their existence. Practically, perception facilitates the adaptation to reality depending on the experiences of each individual. A method that patients may learn to control their various perceptions is self-regulation by mental images, and here we can consider various approaches to (...)
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  33. Patients with Invisible Pain: How Might We See This Pain and Help These Patients More?Edmund G. Howe - 2023 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 34 (3):219-224.
    In this piece I discuss two ways in which providers may become able to treat patients better. The first is for them to encourage all medical parties, including medical students, to always speak up. The second is to take initiatives to learn of pain that patients feel but neither show nor spontaneously report. They may refer to this pain as invisible pain, often bitterly, in that others not seeing their pain judge them wrongly and harshly. Providers, once seeing this pain, (...)
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  34. "Every Perception Is Accompanied by Pain!": Theophrastus's Criticism of Anaxagoras.Wei Cheng - 2023 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 61 (4):559-583.
    abstract: Anaxagoras is notorious for his view that every perception is accompanied by pain but that not all concurrent pains are distinctly felt by the perceiving subject. This thesis is reported and criticized by Aristotle's heir Theophrastus in his De Sensibus. Traditionally, scholars believe that Theophrastus rejects Anaxagoras's thesis of the ubiquity of pain as counterintuitive, with the appeal to unfelt pain looking like a desperate category mistake given that pain is nothing but a feeling. Contra the traditional view, this (...)
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  35. Flesh, Scars, and Clay. The Role of Pain and Bodies in the Creation of Identity and Meaning.Marco Favaro - 2023 - In Marco Favaro & Justin F. Martin (eds.), Batman’s Villains and Villainesses: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Arkham’s Souls. London: Lexington Books. pp. 109-121.
    The mask's role is central to the superhero narrative. The mask is a non-human identity, which replaces the civilian, human one; sometimes forever. It is what happens to the majority of Gotham's villains. While Batman can take off his mask and at least pretend to be Bruce Wayne, many of his enemies do not have the same privilege. For characters like Two-Face, Joker, Zsasz, and Clayface, the mask is carved directly into their bodies. Like masks, scars can replace one's identity, (...)
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  36. Illness, Pain, and Health Care in Early Christianity, by Helen Rhee. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans Publishing, 2022.Molly Ayn Jones-Lewis - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-3.
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  37. Can a Thought's Whole Subject-Matter Be Itself? The Case of Pain.D. Goldstick - forthcoming - Dialogue:1-7.
    Résumé La croyance que l'on est (ou pas) dans un état de douleur est singulière en ceci qu'elle semble pouvoir être qualifiée d'infaillibilité ou d'incorrigibilité logique, de même que le cogito. Mais comment se peut-il que l'existence d'une croyance (vraie) et l'existence du fait qui est l'objet de cette croyance puisssent constituer la même existence? Je propose ici une réponse à cette question. Parfois, une croyance peut être un désir.
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  38. Art and the Lived Experience of Pain.Panayiota Vassilopoulou - 2023 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 94:15-38.
    Mental health has become a key concern within social discourse in recent years, and with it, the discussion about the lived experience of pain. In dealing with this experience there has been a shift away from merely relying on medical care towards more holistic approaches involving community support, public awareness, and social change. However, little if any attention has been paid in this context to the contribution of aesthetic experience engendered by art that expresses and publicly shares with others the (...)
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  39. Relational Pain: The Perspective from the Other Side of the Lens.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2022 - Constructivist Foundations 17 (2):152-154.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Kaleidoscope of Pain: What and How Do You See Through It” by Maja Smrdu. Abstract: Relational dynamics are the vital cornerstone for a holistic understanding of chronic pain, particularly for a 5E stance. Enactivism and Buddhism prove most expedient to examine such dynamics in a theoretical and practical fashion.
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  40. Panopticon of Pain.Vincent Kenny - 2022 - Constructivist Foundations 17 (2):158-161.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Kaleidoscope of Pain: What and How Do You See Through It” by Maja Smrdu. Abstract: Pain remains an unintelligible mystery. Given Smrdu’s efforts to expand the horizons for dealing with chronic pain, I re-present some constructivist ideas regarding communication, including commonly assumed features of communications between patients and clinicians, in particular sharing experience and understanding.
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  41. Variety in the Experience of Pain and Its Explanation.Philipp Schmidt - 2022 - Constructivist Foundations 17 (2):154-156.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Kaleidoscope of Pain: What and How Do You See Through It” by Maja Smrdu. Abstract: Welcoming Smrdu’s proposal to shed light on the experience of pain through the lens of phenomenology and enactivism, I offer two suggestions that may support the kind of 5E approach to pain she develops. First, I argue that a shift from the biopsychosocial model to a phenomenological 5E theory requires understanding “experience” as functioning as both explanans and explanandum. Second, (...)
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  42. Kaleidoscope of Pain: What and How Do You See Through It.Maja Smrdu - 2022 - Constructivist Foundations 17 (2):136-147.
    Context: Among the many theories of pain, the biopsychosocial explanation of pain remains the most established in medicine. However, the three components are unevenly represented, with emphasis on the biological component. From this perspective the experience of pain may considered as an epiphenomenon. Problem: I empirically investigated the characteristics of pain (especially chronic pain) and investigated how these characteristics relate to existing conceptualizations of pain. Method: A case-study approach was used to demonstrate different ways of understanding and describing pain. Case-study (...)
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  43. Chronic Pain, Enactivism, & the Challenges of Integration.Sabrina Coninx & Peter Stilwell - 2023 - In Mark-Oliver Casper & Giuseppe Flavio Artese (eds.), Situated Cognition Research: Methodological Foundations. Springer Verlag. pp. 241-276.
    Chronic pain is one of the most disabling conditions globally, yet we are still missing a satisfying theoretical framework to guide research and clinical practice. This is highly relevant as research and practice are not taking place in a vacuum but are always shaped by a particular philosophy of pain, that is, a set of implicitly or explicitly prevailing assumptions about what chronic pain is and how it is to be addressed. In looking at recent history, we identify a promising (...)
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  44. Reading words hurts: the impact of pain sensitivity on people’s ratings of pain-related words.Kevin Reuter, Markus Werning, Lars Kuchinke & Erica Cosentino - 2017 - Language and Cognition 9 (3):553-567.
    This study explores the relation between pain sensitivity and the cognitive processing of words. 130 participants evaluated the pain-relatedness of a total of 600 two-syllabic nouns, and subsequently reported on their own pain sensitivity. The results demonstrate that pain-sensitive people associate words more strongly with pain than less sensitive people. In particular, concrete nouns like ‘syringe’, ‘wound’, ‘knife’, and ‘cactus’ are considered to be more pain-related for those who are more pain-sensitive. These findings dovetail with recent studies suggesting that certain (...)
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  45. The Common Pain of Surrealism and Death: Acetaminophen Reduces Compensatory Affirmation Following Meaning Threats.Daniel Randles, Steven J. Heine & Nathan Santos - 2013 - Psychological Science 24 (6):966-973.
    The meaning-maintenance model posits that any violation of expectations leads to an affective experience that motivates compensatory affirmation. We explore whether the neural mechanism that responds to meaning threats can be inhibited by acetaminophen, in the same way that acetaminophen inhibits physical pain or the distress caused by social rejection. In two studies, participants received either acetaminophen or a placebo and were provided with either an unsettling experience or a control experience. In Study 1, participants wrote about either their death (...)
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  46. Regarding the Pain of the Others. Do We Need Teleethics?Paweł Bytniewski - 2023 - Filosofija. Sociologija 34 (3).
    I borrow part of the title of my paper from Susan Sontag. In 2003, a year before her death, Susan Sontag published an essay entitled Regarding the Pain of Others. There she takes up the subject of the moral significance of presenting the views of war, violent human death exposed to the lenses of cameras. Her approach to the contemporary issue of mediatisation through the image of the sight of human suffering provokes a question: Do we need teleethics today, the (...)
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  47. Pleasure and Pain in Plato.Clerk Shaw - forthcoming - In Vasilis Politis & Peter Larsen (eds.), The Platonic Mind. London: Routledge.
    This paper proposes a unified reading of pleasure's nature and value in Plato's _Philebus_. It also explains how the proposed reading illuminates certain claims about pleasure across the corpus that initially seem to be in some tension: (i) that pleasure is not the good; (ii) that pleasure is choiceworthy and an aspect of the best human life; and (iii) that pleasure is dangerous and tends to make us into bad people who live badly.
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  48. Suffering narratives of older adults: a phenomenological approach to serious illness, chronic pain, recovery and maternal care.Mary Beth Quaranta Morrissey - 2015 - New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
    This book exploits the power of phenomenological methods to access and describe lived moral experiences of pain and suffering for patients, their families and the wider community. Creating new fields of communication for patients, their family members and health professionals in shared decision making processes, this book builds on knowledge about suffering to help and guide correct action in preventing and relieving chronic pain and improving systems of care. It offers a new phenomenology for understanding moral experience in serious illness (...)
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  49. Pain: Modularity and Cognitive Constitution.Błażej Skrzypulec - forthcoming - The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    Discussions concerning the modularity of the pain system have been focused on questions regarding the cognitive penetrability of pain mechanisms. It has been claimed that phenomena such as placebo analgesia demonstrate that the pain system is cognitively penetrated; therefore, it is not encapsulated from central cognition. However, important arguments have been formulated which aim to show that cognitive penetrability does not in fact entail a lack of modularity of the pain system. This paper offers an alternative way to reject the (...)
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  50. The sound of pain in Sophocles's Philoctetes.Rebecca Steiner Goldner - 2022 - In Jill Gordon (ed.), Hearing, sound, and the auditory in ancient Greece. Indiana University Press.
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