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  1.  50
    The Structured Self in Hellenistic and Roman Thought.Christopher Gill - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Christopher Gill offers a new analysis of what is innovative in Hellenistic--especially Stoic and Epicurean--philosophical thinking about selfhood and personality. His wide-ranging discussion of Stoic and Epicurean ideas is illustrated by a more detailed examination of the Stoic theory of the passions and a new account of the history of this theory. His study also tackles issues about the historical study of selfhood and the relationship between philosophy and literature, especially the presentation of the collapse of character in Plutrarch's Lives, (...)
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  2.  25
    Plato’s Moral Theory: The Early and Middle Dialogues.Christopher Gill - 1977 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 99:176-176.
  3. Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue.Christopher Gill - 1996 - Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological and (...)
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  4. Plato and the Education of Character.Christopher Gill - 1985 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 67 (1):1-26.
  5.  81
    Did Chrysippus Understand Medea?Christopher Gill - 1983 - Phronesis 28 (2):136-149.
  6. Personhood and Personality: The Four-Personae Theory in Cicero, De Officiis I.Christopher Gill - 1988 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 6:169-99.
  7.  11
    The Early Greek Concept of the Soul.Christopher Gill & J. Bremmer - 1985 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 105:205-205.
  8. The Person and the Human Mind: Issues in Ancient and Modern Philosophy.Christopher Gill (ed.) - 1990 - Oxford University Press.
    This collection of essays explores analogous issues in classical and modern philosophy that relate to the concepts of person and human being. A primary focus is whether there are such analogous issues, and whether we can find in ancient philosophy a notion that is comparable to "person" as understood in modern philosophy. Essays on modern philosophy reappraise the validity of the notion of person, while essays on classical philosophy take up the related questions of what being "human" entails in ancient (...)
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  9. Form and Argument in Late Plato.Christopher Gill & Mary Margaret McCabe (eds.) - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Why did Plato put his philosophical arguments into dialogues, rather than presenting them in a plain and readily understandable fashion? A group of distinguished scholars here offer answers to this question by studying the relation between form and argument in his late dialogues. These penetrating studies show that the literary structure of the dialogues is of vital importance in the ongoing interpretation of Plato.
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  10.  15
    Socrates: Philosophy in Plato's Early Dialogues. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 1980 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 100:221-222.
  11.  2
    Reciprocity in Ancient Greece.Christopher Gill, Norman Postlethwaite & Richard Seaford - 1998 - Clarendon Press.
    Reciprocity has been seen as an important notion for anthropologists studying economic and social relations, and this volume examines it in connection with Greek culture from Homer to the Hellenistic period.
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  12.  31
    The Question of Character-Development: Plutarch and Tacitus.Christopher Gill - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (02):469-.
    It is often claimed that in the ancient world character was believed to be something fixed, given at birth and immutable during life. This belief is said to underlie the portrayal of individuals in ancient historiography and biography, particularly in the early Roman Empire; and tc constitute the chief point of difference in psychological assumptions between ancient and modern biography. In this article, I wish to examine the truth of these claims, with particular reference to Plutarch and Tacitus.
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  13. The School in the Roman Imperial Period.Christopher Gill - 2003 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 33--58.
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  14.  27
    The Death of Socrates.Christopher Gill - 1973 - Classical Quarterly 23 (3):25-28.
    The scene at the end of the Phaedo, in which Plato describes how Socrates dies by poisoning from hemlock, is moving and impressive. It gives us the sense of witnessing directly an actual event, accurately and vividly described, the death of the historical Socrates. There are, however, certain curious features in the scene, and in the effects of the hemlock on Socrates, as Plato presents them. In the Phaedo hemlock has only one primary effect: it produces first heaviness and then (...)
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  15.  24
    Brisson Platon: Les Mots Et les Mythes. Paris: Maspero. 1982. Pp. 238. Fr. 78.Christopher Gill - 1984 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:207-208.
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  16.  47
    The Death of Socrates.Christopher Gill - 1973 - Classical Quarterly 23 (01):25-.
    The scene at the end of the Phaedo, in which Plato describes how Socrates dies by poisoning from hemlock, is moving and impressive. It gives us the sense of witnessing directly an actual event, accurately and vividly described, the death of the historical Socrates. There are, however, certain curious features in the scene, and in the effects of the hemlock on Socrates, as Plato presents them. In the Phaedo hemlock has only one primary effect: it produces first heaviness and then (...)
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  17. Is There a Concept of Person in Greek Philosophy?Christopher Gill - 1991 - In S. Everson (ed.), Psychology (Companions to Ancient Thought: 2). New York: Cambridge University Press.
     
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  18.  19
    Ancient Psychotherapy.Christopher Gill - 1985 - Journal of the History of Ideas 46 (3):307.
  19. Afterword: Dialectic and the Dialogue Form in Late Plato.Christopher Gill - 1996 - In Christopher Gill & Mary Margaret McCabe (eds.), Form and Argument in Late Plato. Oxford University Press. pp. 283--311.
  20.  2
    Hermeneutic Philosophy and Plato: Gadamer's Response to the Philebus.Christopher Gill & François Renaud (eds.) - 2010 - Academia.
    This volume of new essays by an international group of scholars examines the response of Hans-Georg Gadamer to Plato, especially to the Philebus. The book studies Gadamer's interpretative approach to the dialogues and unwritten doctrines of Plato. It also shows how, for Gadamer, reading Plato was intimately interconnected with formulating his own philosophical views. The volume also brings out how Gadamer influenced Donald Davidson in his reading of Plato and his philosophical thought. The volume thus explores a fascinating case-study of (...)
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  21.  92
    Naturalistic Psychology in Galen and Stoicism.Christopher Gill - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a study of the psychological ideas of Galen (AD 129-c.210, the most important medical writer in antiquity) and Stoicism (a major philosophical theory in ...
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  22.  7
    Marcus Aurelius: Meditations, Books 1-6.Christopher Gill (ed.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Christopher Gill provides a new translation and commentary on the first half of Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, and a full introduction to this unique and remarkable work: a reflective diary or notebook by a Roman emperor, whose content is based on Stoic philosophy but presented in a highly distinctive way.
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  23. Stoicism and Epicureanism.Christopher Gill - 2009 - In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
     
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  24.  73
    Galen and the Stoics: Mortal Enemies or Blood Brothers?Christopher Gill - 2007 - Phronesis 52 (1):88-120.
    Galen is well known as a critic of Stoicism, mainly for his massive attack on Stoic (or at least, Chrysippean) psychology in "On the Doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato" (PHP) 2-5. Galen attacks both Chrysippus' location of the ruling part of the psyche in the heart and his unified or monistic picture of human psychology. However, if we consider Galen's thought more broadly, this has a good deal in common with Stoicism, including a (largely) physicalist conception of psychology and a (...)
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  25. Rethinking Constitutionalism in Statesman 291-303.Christopher Gill - 1995 - In C. J. Rowe (ed.), Reading the Statesman: Proceedings of the Iii Symposium Platonicum. Academia Verlag.
     
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  26.  11
    The Question of Character-Development: Plutarch and Tacitus.Christopher Gill - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (2):469-487.
    It is often claimed that in the ancient world character was believed to be something fixed, given at birth and immutable during life. This belief is said to underlie the portrayal of individuals in ancient historiography and biography, particularly in the early Roman Empire; and tc constitute the chief point of difference in psychological assumptions between ancient and modern biography. In this article, I wish to examine the truth of these claims, with particular reference to Plutarch and Tacitus.
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  27. Seneca and Selfhood : Integration and Disintegration.Christopher Gill - 2009 - In Shadi Bartsch & David Wray (eds.), Seneca and the Self. Cambridge University Press.
  28.  85
    Plato's Atlantis Story and the Birth of Fiction.Christopher Gill - 1979 - Philosophy and Literature 3 (1):64-78.
  29.  13
    The Ēthos/Pathos Distinction in Rhetorical And Literary Criticism.Christopher Gill - 1984 - Classical Quarterly 34 (1):149-166.
    Jasper Griffin, in his recent book on Homer, has suggested that modern critics would do well to pay more attention to the localized insights and the general critical framework of the ancient Greek commentators. In a previous article, ‘Homeric Pathos and Objectivity’, he claimed to show, by careful study of those passages in which the scholiasts found λεος, οκτος or πάθος, that ‘the ancient scholars were right to regard pathos as one of the most important elements in the Iliad’. also (...)
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  30.  10
    Stoicism and Modern Virtue Ethics.Christopher Gill - 2021 - In Christoph Halbig & Felix Timmermann (eds.), Handbuch Tugend Und Tugendethik. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. pp. 165-176.
    This chapter discusses distinctive features of Stoic ethical thought and their potential contribution to modern moral theory, especially virtue ethics. These features include Stoic ideas on the virtue-happiness relationship, theory of value, ethics and nature, ethical development and relationships to other people. The main claim is that, on these topics, Stoicism can contribute to modern virtue ethics more effectively than Aristotle, despite Aristotle’s well-known role as a stimulus for modern virtue ethics.
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  31.  11
    The Ancient Self: Issues and Approaches.Christopher Gill - 2008 - In Pauliina Remes & Juha Sihvola (eds.), Ancient Philosophy of the Self. Springer. pp. 35--56.
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  32. Galen and the Stoics: What Each Could Learn From the Other About Embodied Psychology.Christopher Gill - 2009 - In Dorothea Frede & Burkhard Reis (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 409-424.
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  33. Psychology.Christopher Gill - 2009 - In James Warren (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  34.  19
    The Ēthos/Pathos Distinction in Rhetorical And Literary Criticism.Christopher Gill - 1984 - Classical Quarterly 34 (01):149-.
    Jasper Griffin, in his recent book on Homer, has suggested that modern critics would do well to pay more attention to the localized insights and the general critical framework of the ancient Greek commentators. In a previous article, ‘Homeric Pathos and Objectivity’, he claimed to show, by careful study of those passages in which the scholiasts found λεος, οκτος or πάθος, that ‘the ancient scholars were right to regard pathos as one of the most important elements in the Iliad’. also (...)
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  35. The Human Being as an Ethical Norm.Christopher Gill - 1990 - In The Person and the Human Mind: Issues in Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  36.  27
    Epictetus: Discourses, Fragments, Handbook.Robin Hard & Christopher Gill (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This is the only complete modern translation of Epictetus's Discourses, together with the Handbook and fragments. A major work of Stoic practical ethics, the Discourses teach that the basis of happiness is up to us. This accessible new translation is accompanied by a full introduction and thorough notes.
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  37.  65
    Cynicism and Stoicism.Christopher Gill - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter discusses the ethical theories of Cynics and Stoics. Cynicism traces its origins to Diogenes of Sinope, the most colourful and outrageous of all such founders of philosophical movements. The core Cynic doctrines articulate the principles embodied in Diogenes' way of life. The central theme is that of following nature, understood as leading a life of extreme primitiveness or self-chosen bestiality. Stoicism offers an alternative to Aristotle, who has been the main Classical source of inspiration for those evolving modern (...)
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  38.  87
    Virtue, Norms, and Objectivity: Issues in Ancient and Modern Ethics.Christopher Gill (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    For much of the twentieth century it was common to contrast the characteristic forms and preoccupations of modern ethical theory with those of the ancient world. However, the last few decades have seen a growing recognition that contemporary moral philosophy now has much in common with its ancient incarnation, in areas as diverse as virtue ethics and ethical epistemology. Christopher Gill has assembled an international team to conduct a fascinating exploration of the relationship between the two fields, exploring key issues (...)
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  39.  3
    Stoic Ethical Theory: How Much Is Enough?Christopher Gill - 2022 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 9 (1):31-49.
    How much theory is enough for a complete account of ancient Stoic ethics and for modern life-guidance? Stoic ethics was presented either purely in its own terms or combined with the idea of human or universal nature. Although the combination of ethical theory with human and universal nature provides the most complete account, each of these modes of presentation was regarded as valid and can provide modern life-guidance.
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  40.  18
    Ethical Reflection and the Shaping of Character: Plato's Republic and Stoicism.Christopher Gill - 1996 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):193-225.
  41.  91
    Mind And Madness In Greek Tragedy.Christopher Gill - 1996 - Apeiron 29 (3):249 - 267.
  42.  68
    Greek Thought.Christopher Gill - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    Four related themes in Greek thought are examined in this book: (1) personality and self, (2) ethics and values (3) individuals and communities, and (4) the idea of nature as a moral norm. Although the focus is on Greek philosophy (the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic period), links between philosophy and literature or the wider culture are also explored. The book combines a survey of recent scholarship on these topics with the author's own interpretations. It can be used by (...)
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  43.  21
    ommentaire sur le Manuel d.Christopher Gill - 1999 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 119:195.
  44.  32
    Peace of Mind and Being Yourself: Panaetius to Plutarch.Christopher Gill - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 4599-4640.
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  45.  82
    A Sociology of Ethics - J. M. Bryant: Moral Codes and Social Structure in Ancient Greece: A Sociology of Greek Ethics From Homer to the Epicureans and Stoics . Pp. Xvi + 575. Albany: State University of New York, 1996. ISBN: 0-7914-3041-3. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):87-89.
  46. Marcus Aurelius'meditations: How Stoic and How Platonic?'.Christopher Gill - 2007 - In Mauro Bonazzi & Christoph Helmig (eds.), Platonic Stoicism, Stoic Platonism: The Dialogue Between Platonism and Stoicism in Antiquity. Leuven University Press. pp. 39--189.
     
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  47.  53
    Platonic Dialogue - Charles L. Griswold : Platonic Writings, Platonic Readings. Pp. Xi + 321. New York and London: Routledge, 1988. £25. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (2):252-253.
  48.  49
    Eric A. Havelock: The Literate Revolution in Greece and its Cultural Consequences. Pp. 336. Princeton University Press, 1982. £17.70. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (2):341-342.
  49. Particulars, Selves, and Individuals in Stoic Philosophy.Christopher Gill - 2010 - In R. W. Sharples (ed.), Particulars in Greek Philosophy: The Seventh S.V. Keeling Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy. Brill.
     
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  50.  32
    Stoicism - A. A. Long: Stoic Studies. Pp. Xvi + 309. Cambridge, New York, and Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1996. £37.50/$59.95. ISBN: 0-521-48263-1. [REVIEW]Christopher Gill - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):90-92.
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