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  1. A Critique of the Standard Chronology of Plato's Dialogues.Mohammad Bagher Ghomi - manuscript
    That i) there is a somehow determined chronology of Plato’s dialogues among all the chronologies of the last century and ii) this theory is subject to many objections, are points this article intends to discuss. Almost all the main suggested chronologies of the last century agree that Parmenides and Theaetetus should be located after dialogues like Meno, Phaedo and Republic and before Sophist, Politicus, Timaeus, Laws and Philebus. The eight objections we brought against this arrangement claim that to place the (...)
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  2. The birth of comedy.David Konstan Henderson, Ralph Rosen, Jeffrey Rusten & W. Niall - unknown - The Classical Review 62 (2).
  3. 2. Platonic Eurhythmy – 4th century BC – part 3.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter Eurhythmy as Mathematical Order – Philebus and Timaeus To conclude this chapter, I would like to come back to a question we left open in the second section. We saw that the dialogues of the early and middle periods do not provide us with many clues on the role of mathematics in Plato's rhythm theory and therefore in his larger aesthetic, ethical and political conception of eurhythmy. Concerning the reference in The Republic to simple mathematical ratios - Sur (...)
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  4. Pleasure and Pain in Plato.Clerk Shaw - forthcoming - In Vasilis Politis & Peter Larsen (eds.), The Platonic Mind. London: Routledge.
    This paper proposes a unified reading of pleasure's nature and value in Plato's _Philebus_. It also explains how the proposed reading illuminates certain claims about pleasure across the corpus that initially seem to be in some tension: (i) that pleasure is not the good; (ii) that pleasure is choiceworthy and an aspect of the best human life; and (iii) that pleasure is dangerous and tends to make us into bad people who live badly.
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  5. Investigation of ‘μέτρον’ in the Philebus – a critique of pleasure in Plato's later years.Guo Wenya - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    In the Philebus, Plato considers pleasure to be part of the good life. Always despises pleasure, Plato, however, no longer insists on extreme rationalism, instead, he reconciles reason and pleasure with the fundamental principle of ‘measure’ In the Philebus, Plato considers ‘measure (μέτρον)’ to be of the highest value. He not only argues for the concrete application of ‘measure’ in the sensual world, but also confirms the metaphysical ground of ‘measure’. Many scholars have discussed the application of ‘measure’ from different (...)
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  6. A less familiar Plato: from Phaedo to Philebus.Kevin Corrigan - 2023 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    Provides a guide to Plato in an unexpected key with well-grounded views of Plato's works (particularly major middle to late dialogues). The reader meets important questions of perception, embodiment, mimetic art, imagination, divine inspiration, the Forms and the Good, beauty, myth and logos, and generative epistemic art.
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  7. Plato's Moral Realism.Lloyd P. Gerson - 2023 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's moral realism rests on the Idea of the Good, the unhypothetical first principle of all. It is this, as Plato says, that makes just things useful and beneficial. That Plato makes the first principle of all the Idea of the Good sets his approach apart from that of virtually every other philosopher. This fact has been occluded by later Christian Platonists who tried to identify the Good with the God of scripture. But for Plato, theology, though important, is subordinate (...)
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  8. The Pythagorean method in the Philebus.Alexandre Losev - 2023 - Philosophia: E-Journal for Philosophy and Culture 30:207-228.
    The well-known connection between the extant fragments of Philolaus and Plato’s Philebus is examined in its methodological aspect. By drawing on more texts, it is shown that Plato was aware of an explanatory scheme that can be attributed to Pythagoreanism. His attempt to modify it is also outlined, which sets the historical-philosophical perspective.
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  9. Three Instances of the Good in Proclus.Arthur Oosthout & Gerd Van Riel - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (2):371-393.
    Plato’sPhilebusfamously combines a deliberation on the virtuous life as a balancing act between prudence and pleasure with a theory of the composition of mixtures from limit and limitedness. The latter aspect of the dialogue is used by the Neoplatonic philosopher Proclus as a basis for his own metaphysical analysis of the ultimate first principle, the One, and the manner in which it produces all things which exist. Multiple scholarly analyses have been provided of Proclus’ use of the Phileban theory of (...)
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  10. Blood and the Awareness of Perception. From Early Greek Thought to Plato’s Timaeus.Maria Michela Sassi - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (2):163-186.
    In this paper I first address what I consider a central issue in the account of perception in Plato’s Timaeus, namely, how the pathemata pass through the body to reach the soul, and thus become aistheseis. My point in Section 1 is that in tackling this issue Plato aims to provide a firm physiological basis to the notion of perception that starts to emerge in the Theaetetus and the Philebus and is crucial to the late development of his theory of (...)
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  11. The Senses of Apeiron_ in _Philebus 16b-27c.Colin C. Smith - 2023 - Méthexis 35:167-184.
    Scholars debate whether ‘apeiron’ (unlimited) is univocal or multivocal in Plato’s 'Philebus.' Offering a ‘middle path,’ I argue that the term is univocal, but used with respect to two senses of unlimited continua. The term appears early in two dense passages on ontological structure: the descriptions of the ‘god-given method’ (16b-18d) and ‘the fourfold division of beings’ (23c-27c). I consider each passage and argue that they respectively concern the eidetic continua of being that the knower comes to understand and the (...)
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  12. Socrates in Plato’s Philebus.William H. F. Altman - 2022 - In Socrates and the Socratic Philosophies: Selected Papers from Socratica IV. Baden-Baden: Academia Verlag. pp. 141-150.
  13. Schelling and the Philebus.Naomi Fisher & Jeffrey J. Fisher - 2022 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):347-367.
    Schelling’s 1794 commentary on the Timaeus makes extensive use of Plato’s Philebus, particularly the principles of limit and unlimited. In this article, we demonstrate the resonances between Schelling’s 1794 treatment of the metaphysics of the Philebus and his 1798 philosophy of nature. Attention to these resonances demonstrates an underexplored but important debt to Plato in Schelling’s philosophy of nature. In particular, Schelling is indebted to Plato’s late metaphysics in his model of the iterative combination of two basic principles: a productive, (...)
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  14. Pleasure, Judgment and the Function of the Painter-Scribe Analogy.Emily Fletcher - 2022 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 104 (2):199-238.
    This paper puts forward a new interpretation of the argument at Philebus 36c–40d that pleasures can be false. Protarchus raises an objection at 37e–38a, and in response Socrates presents the elaborate painter-scribe analogy. Most previous interpretations do not explain how the analogy answers Protarchus’ objection. On my account, Protarchus’ objection relies on the plausible intuition that pleasure is simply not in the business of assessing the world, and so it cannot be charged with doing so incorrectly. Socrates responds by demonstrating (...)
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  15. Similarity and Dependence in the Final Ranking of the Philebus.Ross Gilmore - 2022 - Southwest Philosophy Review 38 (1):155-162.
    The so-called Final Ranking of the Philebus offers Socrates’ final evaluation of the relative merits of pleasure and reason in the best life. I begin by examining two common lines of interpretation as they address the criterion according to which the final ranking is organized. I then discuss the role ‘similarity’ has in organizing the investigation throughout the dialogue, from the initial comparison of the two lives (of reason and pleasure singly) down through the final ranking. I then consider the (...)
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  16. Ephemeral climates: Plato's geographic myths and the phenomenological nature of climate and its changes.Maximilian Gregor Hepach - 2022 - Journal of Historical Geography (X):1-10.
    Historical and cultural approaches to climate generally consider climate to be a stabilising concept between weather and culture. Different historical and cultural concepts of climate signify different ways of learning to live with the weather. However, anthropogenic climate change evidences the limit of this approach: instead of stabilising, climates ephemeralise together with the ways we have come to adapt to them. Changing climates require a concept of climate that captures how climates are experienced both as stable and ephemeral. To create (...)
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  17. Plato on Natural Kinds: The Promethean Method of the Philebus.John D. Proios - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (2):305-327.
    Plato’s invention of the metaphor of carving the world by the joints gives him a privileged place in the history of natural kind theory in philosophy and science; he is often understood to present a paradigmatic but antiquated view of natural kinds as possessing eternal, immutable, necessary essences. Yet, I highlight that, as a point of distinction from contemporary views about natural kinds, Plato subscribes to an intelligent-design, teleological framework, in which the natural world is the product of craft and, (...)
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  18. Plato’s Philebus: A Philosophical Discussion ed. by Panos Dimas, Russell E. Jones and Gabriel R. Lear. [REVIEW]Colin C. Smith - 2022 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 60 (1):155-156.
    Plato’s Philebus is motivated by a question concerning the relationships among pleasure, wisdom, knowledge, and the good human life. Something of a philosophical tour de force, it also contains discussions of numerous important Platonic subjects like cosmic intelligence, distinctions among intellectual capacities, and the method of dialectical inquiry through division and collection. But the riches of the dialogue are obscured by its exceptional difficulty, a frequent grievance from commentators beginning at least with Galen. Plato’s Philebus: A Philosophical Discussion is an (...)
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  19. Plato on the Varieties of Knowledge.Justin Vlasits - 2022 - In Jens Kristian Larsen, Vivil Valvik Hareldsen & Justin Vlasits (eds.), New Perspectives on Platonic Dialectic: A Philosophy of Inquiry. pp. 264-283.
    Plato’s Philebus has often been said to lack unity as a dialogue. In particular, what is the relation between the methodological and metaphysical reflections early in the dialogue and the investigations of pleasure and knowledge that constitutes its main subject matter? This chapter argues that Plato’s Philebus provides a division of knowledge (epistēmē), which satisfies the methodological norms explained earlier in the dialogue. In order to make this claim, Socrates is shown to provide an example of a cross-cutting division not (...)
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  20. Limite, illimitato, prima mescolanza: il ruolo del "Filebo" nel "De animae procreatione in Timaeo" di Plutarco.Francesco Caruso - 2021 - Plato Journal 21:125-147.
    Recent scholarship has recognized some thematic connections related to onto-cosmological issues between two late Platonic dialogues, such as Philebus and Timaeus, and has tried to explain them in different ways. The aim of this paper is to contribute to such a debate by analysing an ancient exegesis of Timaeus 35a1-b4, that of Plutarch of Chaeronea, which made use of the ontological sections of the Philebus in his treatise on the cosmogony of the Timaeus. More specifically, this analysis will show that (...)
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  21. Finding my Way Home: Knowing in the Philebus.Richard A. H. King - 2021 - Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 153 (3):249-268.
    Dans le Philèbe de Platon, Socrate fait valoir que la vie bonne doit consister en la connaissance et le plaisir. Une partie de cette démonstration consiste en une analyse des parties de la connaissance où la connaissance peut être plus ou moins pure, plus ou moins mêlée d’éléments étrangers tels que la sensation ou l’expérience. Lorsqu’elle est pure, elle s’attache à la vérité, pure et simple. Car, nous devons l’admettre, la connaissance est vraie, quoiqu’elle puisse être d’autre par ailleurs. La (...)
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  22. Plato on False Pleasures and False Passions.Patricia Marechal - 2021 - Apeiron 55 (2):281-304.
    In the Philebus, Socrates argues that pleasures can be false in the same way that beliefs can be false. On the basis of Socrates' analysis of malicious pleasure, a mixed pleasure of the soul and a passion, I defend the view that, according to Socrates, pleasures can be false when they represent as pleasant something that is not worthy of our enjoyment, where that means that they represent as pleasant something that is not pleasant in its own right because it (...)
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  23. Classifying Difference and Value: The Metaphysics of Kinds and the Search for the Good in Plato’s Philebus.John Duncan Proios - 2021 - Dissertation, Cornell University
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  24. Philebus 23c-26d: Peras, Apeiron, and Meikton as Measure Theory.George Rudebusch - 2021 - Plato Journal 22.
    At Philebus 23c4-26d10 Socrates makes a division into three kinds: Unbounded (apeiron), Bound (peras), and Mix (meikton). I review problems for the main interpretations of Unbounded and Mix and review kinds of scales defined in abstract measurement theory. Then I take 23c4-26d10 speech by speech, interpreting the Unbounded as a kind containing partial scales, Bound as the kind containing the relations and quantities needed to turn partial scales into appropriate ratio scales, and Mix as the kind containing ratio scales appropriate (...)
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  25. The Place of Flawed Pleasures in a Good Life. A Discussion of Plato’s Philebus.Jan Szaif - 2021 - Plato Journal 22.
    The Philebus describes the “good” that enables human eudaimonia as a “mixture” in which cognitive states have to be combined with certain types of pleasure. This essay investigates how the various senses of falsehood that Plato distinguishes are applied to the question of the hedonic “ingredients” of the good. It argues that his theory allows for the inclusion of certain virtuous pleasures that are deficient with respect to truth: either qua “mixed pleasures” lacking in truth on account of the compresence (...)
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  26. L'âme comme livre: étude sur une image platonicienne.Karel Thein - 2021 - Paris: Classiques Garnier.
    In the Philebus, Plato elaborates an image of our soul as a book where a scribe and a painter are constantly at work. This book examines the implicit premises of this image and aims at overcoming the general polarity of ancient phantasia and modern imagination.
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  27. Problems with the Life of Pleasure: The Γένεσις Argument in Plato's Philebus.Derek Van Zoonen - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (2):167-191.
    At Philebus 53c4–55a12, Plato’s Socrates identifies pleasure as an ontologically inferior “becoming” (γένεσις) rather than a “being” (οὐσία) and then uses this information to infer that pleasure, somehow, lacks value. This paper argues that Plato’s γένεσις argument is not about the goodness of individual, particular episodes of pleasure but instead targets the identification of pleasure as the good around which we ought to organize our lives. It also shows that the argument is made up of two subarguments—the argument from finality (...)
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  28. On the Good Life: Thinking Through the Intermediaries in Plato’s Philebus by Cristina Ionescu.James Wood - 2021 - Review of Metaphysics 75 (1):147-148.
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  29. Anticipatory Pleasure and False Pleasure: Philebus 36c-41a. 전헌상 - 2021 - Journal of the Society of Philosophical Studies 135:1-29.
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  30. Plato Philebus, translated by James Wood.Kelly E. Arenson - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):490-494.
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  31. The Notion of φθόνος in Plato.Luc Brisson - 2020 - In Olivier Renaut & Laura Candiotto (eds.), Emotions in Plato. Brill. pp. 201–219.
    For Plato in the Philebus, envious jealousy (φθόνος) is a state of mind or a disposition of the soul, in which pain is mixed with pleasure, because one affected by envious jealousy is rejoicing at the misfortunes of those around him and being sad at their happiness. For Plato, to reject the envious jealousy is to express his will to establish new relationships between the gods − including universe − and human beings on the one hand, and between human beings (...)
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  32. Socrates' Analysis of Comedy in Plato's Philebus.Derek Duplessie - 2020 - Review of Metaphysics 74 (1):3-20.
  33. Normativity in Plato’s Philebus.Jeffrey J. Fisher - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (8):966-980.
    This paper extracts and articulates the account of normativity in Plato’s Philebus. Central to this account is the concept of measure, which plays both an ontological and a normative role. With regard to the former, measure is what makes particular things to be the specific kind of thing they are; with regard to the latter, measure supplies the appropriate standard for determining whether or not those things are good or bad instances of their kind. As a result of measure playing (...)
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  34. The Emerging Good in Plato’s Philebus. By John V. Garner. [REVIEW]David F. Hoinski - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):211-216.
  35. Philebus 11b: Good or the Good.George Rudebusch - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (2):161-185.
    The sentence setting the stage for the philosophical investigation within the Philebus is, naively translated, “He says that to enjoy is good.” Instead of the predicate adjective “good,” most interpreters prefer to translate with a definite description, “the good,” with consequences that affect the interpretation of the dialogue as a whole. Part one defends the naïve translation, both in the context of Socrates’ first seven speeches and viewing the dialogue as a whole. Part two considers and rejects the reasons given (...)
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  36. Plato’s Philebus.George Rudebusch - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):495-511.
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  37. Plato's Philebus: Greek Text with Basic Grammar.George Hilding Rudebusch, Hayden Niehus & Brianna Zgurich - 2020 - Seattle, WA, USA: Kindle Direct Publishing.
    This commentary makes Plato’s Philebus accessible to second-year Greek readers and for scholars who read Greek only infrequently. We aim to help readers who wish to study the text more closely than translations permit. We hope readers new to Plato will be at ease with him by the time they complete the dialogue, but each page is self-contained: readers interested in only one passage need not worry that they have missed earlier remarks. Each page of the commentary contains about eight (...)
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  38. True Pleasure and its Measure in Plato’s Philebus. 이종환 - 2020 - Cheolhak-Korean Journal of Philosophy 144:1-30.
    이 글은 『필레보스』에서 소크라테스가 나누는 즐거움의 종류가 대상의 존재론적 지위에 달려있기 때문에 오직 순수한 대상에 대한 즐거움만이 참된 즐거움이라는 기존의 해석을 비판적으로 검토하고 즐거움의 종류를 새롭게 구분하는 방법을 제안한다.『필레보스』의 소크라테스는 즐거움이라는 사태가 몸과 혼 모두 혹은 혼에만 작용하는 것이라고 보기 때문에, 극단적인 쾌락주의자의 입장을 비판하면서 즐거움이라는 경험에 있어서 판단이 핵심적이라는 점을 보인다. 그리고 판단의 참과 거짓 여부에 따라서 즐거움 또한 참과 거짓으로 구분된다고 주장한다. 모든 종류의 즐거움은 이에 대한 판단이 참되어야만 참될 수 있으며, 이때 판단이 참된 것은 기대의 내용 혹은 (...)
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  39. Neutral, Natural and Hedonic State in Plato.Wei Cheng - 2019 - Mnemosyne 4 (72):525-549.
    This paper aims to clarify Plato’s notions of the natural and the neutral state in relation to hedonic properties. Contra two extreme trends among scholars—people either conflate one state with the other, or keep them apart as to establish an unsurmount- able gap between both states, I argue that neither view accurately reflects Plato’s position because the natural state is real and can coincide with the neutral state in part, whereas the latter, as an umbrella term, can also be realized (...)
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  40. Plato's Philebus: A Philosophical Discussion.Panos Dimas, Russell E. Jones & Gabriel R. Lear (eds.) - 2019 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This is the inaugural volume of the Plato Dialogue Project: it offers the first collective study of the Philebus - a high point of philosophical ethics, containing some of Plato's most sophisticated discussions of human happiness. The contributors work through the text, discussing pleasure, knowledge, philosophical method, and the human good.
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  41. Plato on Pleasures Mixed with Pains: an Asymmetrical Account.Mehmet M. Erginel - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 56:73-122.
    In this paper I aim to show that the restoration model of pleasure as we find it in Plato’s Gorgias, Republic, Timaeus, and Philebus contain a common psychological core, despite the substantial developments and greater sophistication in the later works. I argue that, contrary to the scholarly consensus, all four dialogues take the necessary condition for pain to be a state of imbalance or disharmony rather than a process of destruction or deterioration. Given that the necessary condition for pleasure is (...)
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  42. On the good life: thinking through the intermediaries in Plato's Philebus.Cristina Ionescu - 2019 - Albany: SUNY Press.
    The unity of the Philebus: metaphysical assumptions of the good human life -- The placement of pleasure and knowledge in the fourfold articulation of reality -- Hybrid varieties of pleasure: true mixed pleasures and false pure pleasures -- The nature of pleasure: absolute standards of filling or replenishment and due measure -- Pleasures of learning and the role of due measure in experiencing them -- Plato's conception of pleasure confronting three Aristotelian critiques -- The Philebus' implicit response to the aporiai (...)
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  43. Plato's city-soul analogy: the slow train to ordinary virtue.Nathan Nicol - 2019 - In Sharon M. Meagher, Samantha Noll & Joseph S. Biehl (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of the City. New York: Routledge. pp. 21-31.
    Plato's city-soul analogy underwrites his overarching argument in the Philebus. I sketch the main lines of the analogy, and then defend it against two prominent objections.
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  44. The Jellyfish’s Pleasures: Philebus 20b-21d.Katharine R. O’Reilly - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):277-291.
    Scholars have characterised the trial of the life of pleasure in Philebus 20b-21d as digressive or pejorative. I argue that it is neither: it is a thought experiment containing an important argument, in the form of a reductio, of the hypothesis that a life could be most pleasant without cognition. It proceeds in a series of steps, culminating in the precisely chosen image of the jellyfish. Understanding the intended resonance of this creature, and the sense in which it is deprived, (...)
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  45. An Educational Interpretation on Plato’s Philebus.Chun-Ho Shin - 2019 - Journal of Moral Education 31 (1):87-106.
  46. Dialectical Methods and the Stoicheia Paradigm in Plato’s Trilogy and Philebus.Colin C. Smith - 2019 - Plato Journal: The Journal of the International Plato Society 19:7-23.
    Plato’s Theaetetus, Sophist, and Statesman exhibit several related dialectical methods relevant to Platonic education: maieutic in Theaetetus, bifurcatory division in Sophist and Statesman, and non-bifurcatory division in Statesman, related to the ‘god-given’ method in Philebus. I consider the nature of each method through the letter or element paradigm, used to reflect on each method. At issue are the element’s appearances in given contexts, its fitness for communing with other elements like it in kind, and its own nature defined through its (...)
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  47. Attitudinal Pleasure in Plato’s Philebus.Brooks A. Sommerville - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):247-276.
    This paper addresses two interpretive puzzles in Plato’s Philebus. The first concerns the claim, endorsed by both interlocutors, that the most godlike of lives is a pleasureless life of pure thinking. This appears to run afoul of the verdict of the earlier so-called ‘Choice of Lives’ argument that a mixed life is superior to either of its ‘pure’ rivals. A second concerns Socrates’ discussion of false pleasure, in which he appears to be guilty of rank equivocation. I argue that we (...)
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  48. Truth, beauty, purity, and pleasure: Philebus 50e-53c.James Warren - 2019 - In Panos Dimas, Russell E. Jones & Gabriel Richardson Lear (eds.), Plato's Philebus: A Philosophical Discussion. Oxford: OUP. pp. 184-201.
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  49. Philebus.James Wood (ed.) - 2019 - Peterborough, CA: Broadview Press.
    The _Philebus _is the only Platonic dialogue that takes as its central theme the fundamental Socratic question of the good, understood as that which makes for the best or happiest life. This predominantly ethical theme not only involves an extended psychological and epistemological investigation of topics such as sensation, memory, desire, anticipation, the truth and falsity of pleasures, and types and gradations of knowledge, but also a methodological exposition of dialectic and a metaphysical schema, found nowhere else in the dialogues, (...)
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  50. Socrates’ Elenchus in Plato’s Philebus. 강유선 - 2019 - Journal of the Society of Philosophical Studies 125:91-127.
    이 논문에서 나는 소크라테스의 엘렌코스가 검증의 역할을 수행하는 진리탐구의 한 방법이며, 비단 윤리의 영역에서 뿐만 아니라 지식을 획득할 수 있는 모든 영역에 있어서 사용되는 탐구방법임을 주장한다. 소크라테스의 엘렌코스에 대한 논의는 대부분 플라톤의 초기 대화편에 한정하여 이루어지지만, 나는 『필레보스』를 통해 엘렌코스의 목적을 밝혀야만 한다고 주장한다. 엘렌코스를 진지한 탐구방법으로 보지 않는 해석은 엘렌코스가 탐구에 성공하지 못하고 아포리아에 빠져버리는 대화상황만을 고려했기 때문인데, 『필레보스』에서는 인간에게 좋은 것이 무엇인지에 대한 탐구가 성공한 경우에 엘렌코스가 쓰인 것을 볼 수 있기 때문이다. 엘렌코스는 언제나 ‘ti esti 물음’에서 시작하는 (...)
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