Results for 'primates'

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  1. Primate Cognition.Amanda Seed & Michael Tomasello - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):407-419.
    As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already possessed by (...)
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  2.  7
    Primate Cognition.Michael Tomasello & Josep Call - 1997 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In this enlightening exploration of our nearest primate relatives, Michael Tomasello and Josep Call address the current state of our knowledge about the cognitive skills of non-human primates and integrate empirical findings from the beginning of the century to the present.
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  3.  8
    Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved: How Morality Evolved.Frans de Waal - 2006 - Princeton University Press.
    "It's the animal in us," we often hear when we've been bad. But why not when we're good? Primates and Philosophers tackles this question by exploring the biological foundations of one of humanity's most valued traits: morality. In this provocative book, primatologist Frans de Waal argues that modern-day evolutionary biology takes far too dim a view of the natural world, emphasizing our "selfish" genes. Science has thus exacerbated our reciprocal habits of blaming nature when we act badly and labeling (...)
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  4.  29
    Picturing Primates and Looking at Monkeys: Why 21st Century Primatology Needs Wittgenstein.Louise Barrett - 2018 - Philosophical Investigations 41 (2):161-187.
    The Social Intelligence or Social Brain Hypothesis is an influential theory that aims to explain the evolution of brain size and cognitive complexity among the primates. This has shaped work in both primate behavioural ecology and comparative psychology in deep and far-reaching ways. Yet, it not only perpetuates many of the conceptual confusions that have plagued psychology since its inception, but amplifies them, generating an overly intellectual view of what it means to be a competent and successful social primate. (...)
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  5.  40
    Primate Social Knowledge and the Origins of Language.Robert M. Seyfarth & Dorothy L. Cheney - 2008 - Mind and Society 7 (1):129-142.
    Primate vocal communication is very different from human language. Differences are most pronounced in call production. Differences in production have been overemphasized, however, and distracted attention from the information that primates acquire when they hear vocalizations. In perception and cognition, continuities with language are more apparent. We suggest that natural selection has favored nonhuman primates who, upon hearing vocalizations, form mental representations of other individuals, their relationships, and their motives. This social knowledge constitutes a discrete, combinatorial system that (...)
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  6. Primates and Philosophers. How Morality Evolved.Frans de Waal, Stephen Macedo, Josiah Ober, Robert Wright, Christine M. Korsgaard & Philip Kitcher - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (3):598-599.
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  7.  24
    Primate Handedness Reconsidered.Peter F. MacNeilage, Michael G. Studdert-Kennedy & Bjorn Lindblom - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):247-263.
  8. Primate Social Cognition and the Core Human Knowledge Concept.John Turri - 2018 - In Masaharu Mizumoto, Stephen Stich & Eric McCready (eds.), Epistemology for the rest of the world: linguistic and cultural diversity and epistemology. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. pp. 279-290.
    I review recent work from armchair and cross-cultural epistemology on whether humans possess a knowledge concept as part of a universal “folk epistemology.” The work from armchair epistemology fails because it mischaracterizes ordinary knowledge judgments. The work from cross-cultural epistemology provides some defeasible evidence for a universal folk epistemology. I argue that recent findings from comparative psychology establish that humans possess a species-typical knowledge concept. More specifically, recent work shows that knowledge attributions are a central part of primate social cognition, (...)
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  9. Nonhuman Primates, Human Need, and Ethical Constraints.David DeGrazia - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (4):27-28.
    “The Ethics of Infection Challenges in Primates,” by Anne Barnhill, Steven Joffe, and Franklin Miller, is an exceptionally timely contribution to the literature on animal research ethics. Animal research has long been both a source of high hopes and a cause for moral concern. When it comes to infection challenge studies with nonhuman primates, neither the hope—to save thousands of human lives from such diseases as Ebola and Marburg—nor the concern—the conviction that primates deserve especially strong protections—could (...)
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  10. The Primate Mindreading Controversy : A Case Study in Simplicity and Methodology in Animal Psychology.Simon Fitzpatrick - 2009 - In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. pp. 224--246.
  11.  30
    Primate Feedstock for the Evolution of Consonants.Adriano R. Lameira, Ian Maddieson & Klaus Zuberbühler - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (2):60-62.
  12. Tactical Deception in Primates.A. Whiten & R. W. Byrne - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):233-244.
  13.  1
    Le primat de le perception et ses conséquences philosophiques.Maurice Merleau-Ponty - 1989 - Grenoble: Verdier.
  14.  92
    Primates, Hominids, and Humans—From Species Specificity to Human Uniqueness? A Response to Barbara J. King, Gregory R. Peterson, Wesley J. Wildman, and Nancy R. Howell. [REVIEW]J. Wentzel van Huyssteen - 2008 - Zygon 43 (2):505-525.
    In this response to essays by Barbara J. King, Gregory R. Peterson, Wesley J. Wildman, and Nancy R. Howell, I present arguments to counter some of the exciting and challenging questions from my colleagues. I take the opportunity to restate my argument for an interdisciplinary public theology, and by further developing the notion of transversality I argue for the specificity of the emerging theological dialogue with paleoanthropology and primatology. By arguing for a hermeneutics of the body, I respond to criticism (...)
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  15.  19
    Primate Sociality to Human Cooperation.Kristen Hawkes - 2014 - Human Nature 25 (1):1-21.
    Developmental psychologists identify propensities for social engagement in human infants that are less evident in other apes; Sarah Hrdy links these social propensities to novel features of human childrearing. Unlike other ape mothers, humans can bear a new baby before the previous child is independent because they have help. This help alters maternal trade-offs and so imposes new selection pressures on infants and young children to actively engage their caretakers’ attention and commitment. Such distinctive childrearing is part of our grandmothering (...)
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  16.  44
    Primate Social Cognition and the Origins of Language.Robert M. Seyfarth, Dorothy L. Cheney & Thore J. Bergman - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (6):264-266.
  17.  21
    Beyond Primates: Research Protections and Animal Moral Value.Rebecca L. Walker - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (4):28-30.
    Should monkeys be used in painful and often deadly infectious disease research that may save many human lives? This is the challenging question that Anne Barnhill, Steven Joffe, and Franklin G. Miller take on in their carefully argued and compelling article “The Ethics of Infection Challenges in Primates.” The authors offer a nuanced and even-handed position that takes philosophical worries about nonhuman primate moral status seriously and still appreciates the very real value of such research for human welfare. Overall, (...)
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  18.  12
    Primate Handedness: A Foot in the Door.Peter F. MacNeilage, Michael G. Studdert-Kennedy & Bjorn Lindblom - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):737-746.
  19. Le primat de la perception et ses conséquences philosophiques.Maurice Merleau-Ponty - 1989 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 179 (4):615-615.
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  20.  19
    Primate Culture and Social Learning.Andrew Whiten - 2000 - Cognitive Science 24 (3):477-508.
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  21.  68
    The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion.Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely as constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological reflections (...)
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  22.  20
    Primate Language and the Playback Experiment, in 1890 and 1980.Gregory Radick - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):461-493.
    The playback experiment -- the playing back of recorded animal sounds to the animals in order to observe their responses -- has twice become central to celebrated researches on non-human primates. First, in the years around 1890, Richard Garner, an amateur scientist and evolutionary enthusiast, used the new wax cylinder phonograph to record and reproduce monkey utterances with the aim of translating them. Second, in the years around 1980, the ethologists Peter Marler, Robert Seyfarth, and Dorothy Cheney used tape (...)
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  23. Primate Vocal and Gestural Communication.Michael Tomasello & Klaus Zuberbühler - 2002 - In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 293--29.
  24.  92
    Primates and Religion: A Biological Anthropologist's Response to J. Wentzel Van Huyssteen's Alone in the World?Barbara J. King - 2008 - Zygon 43 (2):451-466.
    For a biological anthropologist interested in the prehistory of religion, J. Wentzel van Huyssteen's book is welcome and resonant. Van Huyssteen's central thesis is that humans' capacity for spirituality emerges from a transformation of cognition and emotions that takes place in the symbolic realm, within Homo sapiens and apart from biology. To his thesis I bring to bear three areas of response: the abundant cognitive and emotional capacities of living apes and extinct hominids; the role of symbolic ritual in the (...)
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    Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved: How Morality Evolved.Stephen Macedo & Josiah Ober (eds.) - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    "It's the animal in us," we often hear when we've been bad. But why not when we're good? Primates and Philosophers tackles this question by exploring the biological foundations of one of humanity's most valued traits: morality. In this provocative book, primatologist Frans de Waal argues that modern-day evolutionary biology takes far too dim a view of the natural world, emphasizing our "selfish" genes. Science has thus exacerbated our reciprocal habits of blaming nature when we act badly and labeling (...)
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  26. Primates Are Touched by Your Concern: Touch, Emotion, and Social Cognition in Chimpanzees.Maria Botero - 2018 - In Kristin Andrews & Jacob Beck (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds. London: Routledge. pp. p. 372-380.
    There is something important about the way human primates use touch in social encounters; for example, consider greetings in airports (hugs vs. handshakes) and the way children push each other in a playground (a quick push to warn, a really hard one when it is serious!). Human primates use touch as a way of conveying a wide range of social information. In this chapter I will argue that one of the best ways of understanding social cognition in non-human (...)
     
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  27.  30
    Primate Cognition: From 'What Now?' to 'What If?'.L. Barrett - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (11):494-497.
  28.  18
    Le primat de la raison pure pratique.Emmanuel Lévinas - 2019 - Philosophie 3:6.
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  29. Primates and Philosophers.Stephen Macedo & Josiah Ober (eds.) - 2006 - Princeton University Press.
    "It's the animal in us," we often hear when we've been bad. But why not when we're good? Primates and Philosophers tackles this question by exploring the biological foundations of one of humanity's most valued traits: morality. -/- In this provocative book, primatologist Frans de Waal argues that modern-day evolutionary biology takes far too dim a view of the natural world, emphasizing our "selfish" genes. Science has thus exacerbated our reciprocal habits of blaming nature when we act badly and (...)
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  30.  16
    Primates, and Children.Amanda Seed, Daniel Hanus & Iosep Call - 2011 - In Teresa McCormack, Christoph Hoerl & Stephen Andrew Butterfill (eds.), Tool Use and Causal Cognition. Oxford University Press. pp. 89.
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  31. Primate People: Saving Nonhuman Primates Through Education, Advocacy, and Sanctuary.Marc Bekoff - 2012 - University of Utah Press.
    This thought-provoking collection sheds light on the plight of our nonhuman primate cousins--and what we can do to help.
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  32.  31
    Comparative Primate Neuroimaging: Insights Into Human Brain Evolution.James K. Rilling - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (1):46-55.
  33.  34
    Nonhuman Primates Prefer Slow Tempos but Dislike Music Overall☆.J. Mcdermott & M. Hauser - 2007 - Cognition 104 (3):654-668.
  34.  15
    Does Calorie Restriction in Primates Increase Lifespan? Revisiting Studies on Macaques and Mouse Lemurs.Eric Le Bourg - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (10):1800111.
    The effects of calorie restriction have now been studied in two non‐human primates, the macaque Macaca mulatta and the mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. The study on lemurs and one of the two studies on macaques have reported a lifespan increase. In this review, I argue that these results are better explained by a lifespan decrease in the control group because of a bad diet and/or overfeeding, rather than by a real lifespan increase in calorie‐restricted animals. If these results can (...)
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  35. Primate Retina and Choroid.Wolf Krebs - 1991 - New York, NY, USA: Springer.
    An Atlas of the fine structure of the retina in Primates including humans.
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  36.  63
    The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom, and Morality.Mary Midgley - 1994 - Routledge.
    In The Ethical Primate , Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the Times Literary Supplement , addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have come about.
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  37.  46
    Primates, Monks and the Mind.Frans de Waal, Evan Thompson & J. Proctor - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (7):38-54.
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  38.  32
    A Primate Dictionary? Decoding the Function and Meaning of Another Species' Vocalizations.Marc D. Hauser - 2000 - Cognitive Science 24 (3):445-475.
  39. Primate Politics.Glendon Schubert & Roger D. Masters - 1992 - Ethics 103 (1):188-189.
     
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  40.  67
    Secondary Emotions in Non-Primate Species? Behavioural Reports and Subjective Claims by Animal Owners.Paul H. Morris, Christine Doe & Emma Godsell - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (1):3-20.
    (2008). Secondary emotions in non-primate species? Behavioural reports and subjective claims by animal owners. Cognition & Emotion: Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 3-20.
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  41.  35
    Le primat de la Stimmung sur la corporéité du Dasein.Michel Haar - 1986 - Heidegger Studies 2:67-80.
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  42.  42
    Priming Primates: Human and Otherwise.Mark Chen, Tanya L. Chartrand, Annette Y. Lee-Chai & John A. Bargh - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):685-686.
    The radical nub of Byrne & Russon's argument is that passive priming effects can produce much of the evidence of higher-order cognition in nonhuman primates. In support of their position we review evidence of similar behavioral priming effects n humans. However, that evidence further suggests that even program-level imitative behavior can be produced through priming.
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  43. Primate People: Saving Nonhuman Primates Through Education, Advocacy, and Sanctuary.Lisa Kemmerer (ed.) - 2012 - University of Utah Press.
    In the last 30 years the bushmeat trade has led to the slaughter of nearly 90 percent of West Africa’s bonobos, perhaps our closest relatives, and has recently driven Miss Waldron’s red colobus monkey to extinction. Earth was once rich with primates, but every species—except one—is now extinct or endangered because of one primate—_Homo sapiens_. How have our economic and cultural practices pushed our cousins toward destruction? Would we care more about their fate if we knew something of their (...)
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  44.  16
    Primate Orphans.Maria Botero - 2020 - In Todd Shackelford & Jennifer Vonk (eds.), Encyclopedia of Animal Cognition and Behavior.
    In infancy, all primates require a caregiver who meets their physical needs, such as food and protection (among many others), and their affective, cognitive, and social needs (in some species, this requirement extends until the primate is a juvenile). The caregiver is essential for primate infant survival and social and cognitive development. For that reason, infants are greatly affected if they lose their caregivers; the effects of becoming an orphan range from being unable to survive to behavioral and physiological (...)
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  45.  58
    I, Primate. [REVIEW]Robert A. Wilson - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (2):285-299.
    This is a joint review of Shirley Strum and Linda Fedigan's Primate Encounters: Models of Science, Gender, and Society (Chicago, 2000) and Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, Mother Nature: A History of Mothers, Infants, and Natural Selection (Pantheon, 1999).
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  46. Primate Cognitive Studies.Bennett L. Schwartz & Michael J. Beran (eds.) - 2022 - Cambridge University Press.
    Researchers have studied non-human primate cognition along different paths, including social cognition, planning and causal knowledge, spatial cognition and memory, and gestural communication, as well as comparative studies with humans. This volume describes how primate cognition is studied in labs, zoos, sanctuaries, and in the field, bringing together researchers examining similar issues in all of these settings and showing how each benefits from the others. Readers will discover how lab-based concepts play out in the real world of free primates. (...)
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  47.  1
    Primate Documentaries: A Critical Analysis of Their History.Crystal M. Riley Koenig & Bryan L. Koenig - forthcoming - Society and Animals:1-23.
    Primate nature documentaries have been popular with audiences since their inception in the early 1900s. Audiences trust primate documentaries, but scholars are concerned about how documentaries sometimes misrepresent primates. We provide an analysis of the history of primate documentaries, with a focus on how and why misrepresentation happens. We summarize why wildlife documentaries are important, and then we explain concerns over documentaries’ mischaracterization of nonhuman animals. Then, having viewed every available primate documentary, we provide the first scholarly attempt to (...)
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  48.  25
    What Cognitive Representations Support Primate Theory of Mind?Alia Martin & Laurie R. Santos - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (5):375-382.
  49.  21
    Using Non-Human Primates to Benefit Humans: Research and Organ Transplantation.David Shaw, Wybo Dondorp & Guido de Wert - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):573-578.
    Emerging biotechnology may soon allow the creation of genetically human organs inside animals, with non-human primates and pigs being the best candidate species. This prospect raises the question of whether creating organs in primates in order to then transplant them into humans would be more acceptable than using them for research. In this paper, we examine the validity of the purported moral distinction between primates and other animals, and analyze the ethical acceptability of using primates to (...)
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  50. How Primate Mothers and Infants Communicate, Characterizing Interaction in Mother-Infant Studies Across Species.Maria Botero - 2016 - In Marco Pina & Nathalie Gontier (eds.), The Evolution of Social Communication in Primates: A Multidisciplinary Approach. London, UK: pp. pp. 83-100.
    All methodologies used to characterize mother-infant interaction in non-human primates includes mother, infant, and other social factors. The chief difference is their understanding of how this interaction takes place. Using chimpanzees as a model, I will compare the different methodologies used to describe mother-infant interaction and show how implicit notions of communication and social interaction shape descriptions of this kind of interaction. I will examine the limitations and advantages of different approaches used in mother-infant studies and I will sketch (...)
     
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