This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related

Contents
42 found
Order:
  1. “All animals are conscious”: Shifting the null hypothesis in consciousness science.Kristin Andrews - 2024 - Mind and Language 39 (3):415-433.
    The marker approach is taken as best practice for answering the distribution question: Which animals are conscious? However, the methodology can be used to increase confidence in animals many presume to be unconscious, including C. elegans, leading to a trilemma: accept the worms as conscious; reject the specific markers; or reject the marker methodology for answering the distribution question. I defend the third option and argue that answering the distribution question requires a secure theory of consciousness. Accepting the hypothesis all (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. Kantian Animal Moral Psychology: Empirical Markers for Animal Morality.Erik Nelson - 2024 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 11:716-746.
    I argue that a Kantian inspired investigation into animal morality is both a plausible and coherent research program. To show that such an investigation is possible, I argue that philosophers, such as Korsgaard, who argue that reason demarcates nonhuman animals from the domain of moral beings are equivocating in their use of the term ‘rationality’. Kant certainly regards rationality as necessary for moral responsibility from a practical standpoint, but his distinction between the noumenal and phenomenal means that he can only (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Nonlinguistic Mind: Nonlinguistic Concepts, Normativity, and Animal Cognition.Erik Nelson - 2024 - Dissertation, Dalhousie University
    I argue that at least some nonlinguistic animals have conceptual capabilities. First, I show that positions that take linguistic capabilities to be necessary for conceptual capabilities are unable to explain the possibility of concept acquisition. Second, I argue that awareness of abstract relations requires conceptual capabilities and success at relational matching-to-sample tasks requires awareness of the abstract relations of same and different. Crows and amazons are able to succeed at relational matching-to-sample tasks, so we should attribute conceptual capabilities to them. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Theory-construction in comparative cognition: assessing the case of animal normativity.Nicolás Sebastián Sánchez - 2024 - ArtefaCToS. Revista de Estudios Sobre la Ciencia y la Tecnología 13 (1):255-277.
    With an extensive amount of research on the social lives of primates, Frans de Waal has been a pioneering advocate for the continuity of human and non-human minds, putting forward the idea that these creatures exhibit rudimentary political and moral behaviors. One of the traits which de Waal focuses on is animal normativity, a set of behaviors functionally defined as adherence to social standards. Recently, some philosophers have endorsed this position, holding that animals show a psychological capacity called normative cognition (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Demographic Cultures and Demographic Skepticism.Andrew Buskell - 2023 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 14 (2):477-496.
    The social sciences often explain behavioral differences by appealing to membership in distinct cultural groups. This work uses the concepts of “cultures” and “cultural groups” like any other demographic category (e.g. “gender”, “socioeconomic status”). I call these joint conceptualizations of “cultures” and “cultural groups” _demographic cultures_. Such demographic cultures have long been subject to scrutiny. Here I isolate and respond to a set of arguments I call _demographic skepticism_. This skeptical position denies that the demographic cultures concept can support metaphysically (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Cumulative culture and complex cultural traditions.Andrew Buskell - 2022 - Mind and Language 37 (3):284-303.
    Cumulative cultural evolution is often claimed to be distinctive of human culture. Such claims are typically supported with examples of complex and historically late-appearing technologies. Yet by taking these as paradigm cases, researchers unhelpfully lump together different ways that culture accumulates. This article has two aims: (a) to distinguish four types of cultural accumulation: adaptiveness, complexity, efficiency, and disparity and (b) to highlight the epistemic implications of taking complex hominin technologies as paradigmatic instances of cumulative culture. Addressing these issues both (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  7. Internationale vergelijkingen kunnen op verschillende manieren ook problematisch zijn.Michael Merry & Anders Schinkel - 2022 - Knack.
    Internationale vergelijkingen vormen een waardvolle bron van inzicht bij het analyseren van maatschappelijke problemen en het beoordelen van beleidsmatige antwoorden op die problemen. Vergelijkend onderzoek levert vaak interessante of nuttige informatie op doordat er verschillen én overeenkomsten worden geconstrueerd, bijvoorbeeld: hoe ‘leefbaar’ is Toronto vergeleken met Berlijn? Zelfs wanneer de definities verschillen en de gebruikte meeteenheden enigszins onnauwkeurig kunnen zijn – bijvoorbeeld “leefbaar voor wie en ten opzichte van wat?” – zijn vergelijkingen leerrijk en aanleiding voor verdere reflectie. Maar internationale (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Animal moral psychologies.Susana Monsó & Kristin Andrews - 2022 - In Manuel Vargas & John Doris (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press.
    Observations of animals engaging in apparently moral behavior have led academics and the public alike to ask whether morality is shared between humans and other animals. Some philosophers explicitly argue that morality is unique to humans, because moral agency requires capacities that are only demonstrated in our species. Other philosophers argue that some animals can participate in morality because they possess these capacities in a rudimentary form. Scientists have also joined the discussion, and their views are just as varied as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  9. What is so special about episodic memory: lessons from the system-experience distinction.Shen Pan - 2022 - Synthese 200 (1):1-26.
    Compared to other forms of memory, episodic memory is commonly viewed as special for being distinctively metarepresentational and, relatedly, uniquely human. There is an inherent ambiguity in these conceptions, however, because “episodic memory” has two closely connected yet subtly distinct uses, one designating the recollective experience and the other designating the underlying neurocognitive system. Since experience and system sit at different levels of theorizing, their disentanglement is not only necessary but also fruitful for generating novel theoretical hypotheses. To show this, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. Correlative Thinking in Pacific Island (Micronesian) Cultural Philosophies.James Sellmann - 2021 - Pacific Asia Inquiry: Multidisciplinary Perspectives 11:154-175.
    To continue the project of explicating Pacific values and worldviews, this paper focuses on correlative thinking in some of the cultural philosophies of the Pacific islands, especially Micronesia. Correlative thinking differs, in degree, from scientific and academic logic that emphasize the truth-value of statements. After examining aspects of correlative thinking in Bali and the Philippines, I extract some characteristics of Pacific philosophies from cultural practices, myths, and beliefs. Unlike William Alkire (Alkire, 1972), I find that Pacific islanders use correlative thinking, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. How to Study Animal Minds.Kristin Andrews - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    Comparative psychology, the multidisciplinary study of animal behavior and psychology, confronts the challenge of how to study animals we find cute and easy to anthropomorphize, and animals we find odd and easy to objectify, without letting these biases negatively impact the science. In this Element, Kristin Andrews identifies and critically examines the principles of comparative psychology and shows how they can introduce other biases by objectifying animal subjects and encouraging scientists to remain detached. Andrews outlines the scientific benefits of treating (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. Why literalism is still the best game in town: Replies to Drayson, Machery, and Schwitzgebel.Carrie Figdor - 2020 - Mind and Language 35 (5):687-693.
    In Pieces of Mind: The Proper Domain of Psychological Predicates (Oxford UP, 2018), I argue that psychological predicates used to ascribe cognitive capacities to many nonhuman biological species should be interpreted literally with the same reference for humans and nonhumans alike. In this Mind & Language book symposium, I respond to comments and criticisms by Zoe Drayson, Edouard Machery, and Eric Schwitzgebel, and conclude that the Literalist position is still the best interpretation of these uses.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Performance vs. competence in human–machine comparisons.Chaz Firestone - 2020 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 41.
    Does the human mind resemble the machines that can behave like it? Biologically inspired machine-learning systems approach “human-level” accuracy in an astounding variety of domains, and even predict human brain activity—raising the exciting possibility that such systems represent the world like we do. However, even seemingly intelligent machines fail in strange and “unhumanlike” ways, threatening their status as models of our minds. How can we know when human–machine behavioral differences reflect deep disparities in their underlying capacities, vs. when such failures (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  14. Learning from the Past: Epistemic Generativity and the Function of Episodic Memory.A. Boyle - 2019 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 26 (5-6):242-251.
    I argue that the function of episodic memory is to store information about the past, against the orthodox view that it is to support imagining the future. I show that episodic memory is epistemically generative, allowing organisms to learn from past events retroactively. This confers adaptive benefits in three domains: reasoning about the world, skill, and social interaction. Given the role of evolutionary perspectives in comparative research, this argument necessitates a radical shift in the study of episodic memory in nonhumans.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  15. The impure phenomenology of episodic memory.Alexandria Boyle - 2019 - Mind and Language 35 (5):641-660.
    Episodic memory has a distinctive phenomenology: it involves “mentally reliving” a past event. It has been suggested that characterising episodic memory in terms of this phenomenology makes it impossible to test for in animals, because “purely phenomenological features” cannot be detected in animal behaviour. Against this, I argue that episodic memory's phenomenological features are impure, having both subjective and objective aspects, and so can be behaviourally detected. Insisting on a phenomenological characterisation of episodic memory consequently does nothing to damage the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  16. The Mental Lives of Sheep and the Quest for a Psychological Taxonomy.Carrie Figdor - 2019 - Animal Sentience 25 (16):1-3.
    In this commentary on Marino and Merskin's "Intelligence, complexity, and individuality in sheep", I argue that their literature review provides further evidence of the fundamental theoretical shift in psychology towards a non-anthropocentric psychological taxonomy, in which cognitive capacities are classified in a structure that provides an overall understanding of the place of mind (including human minds) throughout nature.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Provincialism in Pragmatics.Josh Armstrong - 2018 - Philosophical Perspectives 32 (1):5-40.
    The central claim of my paper is that pragmatics has a wider scope of application than has been generally appreciated. In particular, I will argue that many discussions of pragmatics are guilty of a problematic form of provincialism. The provincialism at issue restricts the class of target systems of study to those involving groups of developmentally typical humans (or slightly idealized versions thereof), either explicitly as a matter of principle or implicitly as consequence of how it construes the underlying pragmatic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18. Zoomorphism.Bence Nanay - 2018 - Erkenntnis 86 (1):171-186.
    Anthropomorphism is the methodology of attributing human-like mental states to animals. Zoomorphism is the converse of this: it is the attribution of animal-like mental states to humans. Zoomorphism proceeds by first understanding what kind of mental states animals have and then attributing these mental states to humans. Zoomorphism has been widely used as scientific methodology especially in cognitive neuroscience. But it has not been taken seriously as a philosophical explanatory paradigm: as a way of explaining the building blocks of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. Primate Orphans.Maria Botero - 2017 - In Todd Shackelford & Jennifer Vonk (eds.), Encyclopedia of Animal Cognition and Behavior. Springer.
    In infancy, all primates require a caregiver who meets their physical needs, such as food and protection (among many others), and their affective, cognitive, and social needs (in some species, this requirement extends until the primate is a juvenile). The caregiver is essential for primate infant survival and social and cognitive development. For that reason, infants are greatly affected if they lose their caregivers; the effects of becoming an orphan range from being unable to survive to behavioral and physiological consequences (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Mirror Self‐Recognition and Self‐Identification.Alexandria Boyle - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 97 (2):284-303.
    That great apes are the only primates to recognise their reflections is often taken to show that they are self-aware—however, there has been much recent debate about whether the self-awareness in question is psychological or bodily self-awareness. This paper argues that whilst self-recognition does not require psychological self-awareness, to claim that it requires only bodily self-awareness would leave something out. That is that self-recognition requires ‘objective self-awareness’—the capacity for first person thoughts like ‘that's me’, which involve self-identification and so are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21. Comparative Studies in the Psychology of Ants and of Higher Animals.Erich Wasmann - 2015 - Palala Press.
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Waiting by mistake: Symbolic representation of rewards modulates intertemporal choice in capuchin monkeys, preschool children and adult humans.Elsa Addessi, Francesca Bellagamba, Alexia Delfino, Francesca De Petrillo, Valentina Focaroli, Luigi Macchitella, Valentina Maggiorelli, Beatrice Pace, Giulia Pecora, Sabrina Rossi, Agnese Sbaffi, Maria Isabella Tasselli & Fabio Paglieri - 2014 - Cognition 130 (3):428-441.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  23. Anthropomorphism, anthropectomy, and the null hypothesis.Kristin Andrews & Brian Huss - 2014 - Biology and Philosophy 29 (5):711-729.
    We examine the claim that the methodology of psychology leads to a bias in animal cognition research against attributing “anthropomorphic” properties to animals . This charge is examined in light of a debate on the role of folk psychology between primatologists who emphasize similarities between humans and other apes, and those who emphasize differences. We argue that while in practice there is sometimes bias, either in the formulation of the null hypothesis or in the preference of Type-II errors over Type-I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  24. The Humean Approach to Moral Diversity.Mark Collier - 2013 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):41-52.
    In ‘A Dialogue’, Hume offers an important reply to the moral skeptic. Skeptics traditionally point to instances of moral diversity in support of the claim that our core values are fixed by enculturation. Hume argues that the skeptic exaggerates the amount of variation in moral codes, however, and fails to adopt an indulgent stance toward attitudes different from ours. Hume proposes a charitable interpretation of moral disagreement, moreover, which traces it back to shared principles of human nature. Contemporary philosophers attempt (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Cephalopod Cognition in an Evolutionary Context: Implications for Ethology. [REVIEW]Joseph J. Vitti - 2013 - Biosemiotics 6 (3):393-401.
    What is the distribution of cognitive ability within the animal kingdom? It would be egalitarian to assume that variation in intelligence is everywhere clinal, but examining trends among major phylogenetic groups, it becomes easy to distinguish high-performing ‘generalists’ – whose behavior exhibits domain-flexibility – from ‘specialists’ whose range of behavior is limited and ecologically specific. These generalists include mammals, birds, and, intriguingly, cephalopods. The apparent intelligence of coleoid cephalopods (squids, octopuses, and cuttlefish) is surprising – and philosophically relevant – because (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  26. On Hans, Zou and the others: wonder animals and the question of animal intelligence in early twentieth-century France.Sofie Lachapelle & Jenna Healey - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (1):12-20.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. We don't need a microscope to explore the chimpanzee's mind.Daniel Povinelli & Vonk & Jennifer - 2006 - In Susan Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Evolving the Psychological Mechanisms for Cooperation.Jeffrey R. Stevens & Marc D. Hauser - 2005 - Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics 36:499-518.
    Cooperation is common across nonhuman animal taxa, from the hunting of large game in lions to the harvesting of building materials in ants. Theorists have proposed a number of models to explain the evolution of cooperative behavior. These ultimate explanations, however, rarely consider the proximate constraints on the implementation of cooperative behavior. Here we review several types of cooperation and propose a suite of cognitive abilities required for each type to evolve. We propose that several types of cooperation, though theoretically (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  29. Religious Pluralism and its Discontents: Faith and the ‘Logic of Exclusion'.Guy Axtell - 2003 - Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion 8:49-74.
    Debate over the adequacy of John Hick's conception of religious pluralism is engaged in a comparative manner.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  30. Chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys: comparative cognition.James R. Anderson - 1996 - In A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.), Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 23--56.
  31. The Minds of Animals: Theoretical Foundations of Comparative Psychology.Anderson Graham Brown - 1996 - Dissertation, University of Colorado at Boulder
    The use of intentional terms in the explanation of many animals is defended. Contemporary cognitive psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience posit mediums of representation in models of cognition. Representations are a form of content-bearing intentional states. Modular models of cognition provide a foundation for comparative psychology within the context of a representational theory of mind. ;The argument is supported with reviews of data from avian and primate research.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Chimpanzees–bridging the gap.Jane Goodall - 1993 - In Peter Singer & Paola Cavalieri (eds.), The Great Ape Project. St. Martin's Griffin. pp. 10--18.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. The experimental-analysis of cognition in animals.R. Cook - 1991 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):512-512.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Animal Learning.Donald A. Dewsbury - 1991 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (1):57-58.
  35. A communicative approach to animal cognition: A study of conceptual abilities of an African grey parrot.I. Pepperberg - 1991 - In Carolyn A. Ristau (ed.), Cognitive Ethology: The Minds of Other Animals. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 153--186.
  36. Toward an understanding of the differences in the responses of humans and other animals to density.Reuben M. Baron & Stephen P. Needel - 1980 - Psychological Review 87 (3):320-326.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Reconciling apparent differences between the responses of humans and other animals to crowding.Jonathan L. Freedman - 1979 - Psychological Review 86 (1):80-85.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. The Animal Mind.C. Lloyd Morgan - 1931 - Philosophy 6 (23):392-394.
  39. The interpretation of the animal mind.Harvey A. Carr - 1927 - Psychological Review 34 (2):87-106.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  40. The development of animal psychology in the United States during the past three decades.C. J. Warden & L. H. Warner - 1927 - Psychological Review 34 (3):196-205.
  41. The Investigation of Mind in Animals.Emily Mary Smith - 1915
    CONTENTS CHAP................................................................................ PAGE I. Introductory: Protozoan behaviour................................ i II. Retentiveness: Habit-formation.................................. 24 III. Associative Memory and Sensory Discrimination.... 47 IV. Instinct........................................................................... 77 V. Homing........................................................................... 99 VI. Imitation...................................................................... 122 VII. The Evidence for Intelligence and for Ideas........... 146 Bibliography..................................................................... 175 Index 180.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Methods in Animal Psychology.L. W. Kline - 1899 - Philosophical Review 8:433.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark