182 found
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  1. The Case for Animal Rights.Tom Regan & Mary Midgley - 1986 - The Personalist Forum 2 (1):67-71.
     
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  2. Animals and Why They Matter.Mary Midgley - 1983 - University of Georgia Press.
    Whether considering vegetarianism, women's rights, or the "humanity" of pets, this book goes to the heart of the question of why all animals matter.
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  3. Beast and Man: The Roots of Human Nature.Mary Midgley - 1978 - Routledge.
    Philosophers have traditionally concentrated on the qualities that make human beings different from other species. In _Beast and Man_ Mary Midgley, one of our foremost intellectuals, stresses continuities. What makes people tick? Largely, she asserts, the same things as animals. She tells us humans are rather more like other animals than we previously allowed ourselves to believe, and reminds us just how primitive we are in comparison to the sophistication of many animals. A veritable classic for our age, _Beast and (...)
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  4. Gene-Juggling.Mary Midgley - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (210):439.
    Genes cannot be selfish or unselfish, any more than atoms can be jealous, elephants abstract or biscuits teleological. This should not need mentioning, but Richard Dawkins's book The Selfish Gene has succeeded in confusing a number of people about it, including Mr J. L. Mackie. What Mackie welcomes in Dawkins is a new, biological-looking kind of support for philosophic egoism. If this support came from Dawkins's producing important new facts, or good new interpretations of old facts, about animal life, this (...)
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  5.  87
    What is Philosophy For?Mary Midgley - 2018 - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Why should anybody take an interest in philosophy? Is it just another detailed study like metallurgy? Or is it similar to history, literature and even religion: a study meant to do some personal good and influence our lives? In her last published work, Mary Midgley addresses provocative questions, interrogating the various forms of our current intellectual anxieties and confusions and how we might deal with them. In doing so, she provides a robust, yet not uncritical, defence of philosophy and the (...)
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  6. Science as Salvation: A Modern Myth and its Meaning.Mary Midgley - 1992 - Routledge.
    Science as Salvation discusses the high spiritual ambitions which tend to gather round the notion of science. Officially, science claims only the modest function of establishing facts. Yet people still hope for something much grander from it--namely, the myths by which to shape and support life in an increasingly confusing age. Our faith in science is abused by some scientists whose adolescent fantasies have spilled over into their professional lives. Salvation, immortality, mastery of the universe, humans without bodies, and intelligent (...)
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  7. Biotechnology and Monstrosity: Why We Should Pay Attention to the "Yuk Factor".Mary Midgley - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (5):7-15.
    We find our way in the world partly by means of the discriminatory power of our emotions. The gut sense that something is repugnant or unsavory—the sort of feeling that many now have about various forms of biotechnology—sometimes turns out to be rooted in articulable and legitimate objections, which with time can be spelled out, weighed, and either endorsed or dismissed. But we ought not dismiss the emotional response at the outset as “mere feeling.”.
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  8. Wickedness: A Philosophical Essay.Mary Midgley - 1984 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    To look into the darkness of the human soul is a frightening venture. Here Mary Midgley does so, with her customary brilliance and clarity. Midgley's analysis proves that the capacity for real wickedness is an inevitable part of human nature. This is not however a blanket acceptance of evil. Out of this dark journey she returns with an offering to us: an understanding of human nature that enhances our very humanity.
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  9.  4
    Are You an Illusion?Mary Midgley - 2014 - Routledge.
    Renowned philosopher Mary Midgley explores the remarkable gap that has opened up between our own understanding of our sense of our self and today's scientific orthodoxy that claims the self to be nothing more than an elaborate illusion. Bringing her formidable acuity and analytic skills to bear, she exposes some very odd claims and muddled thinking on the part of cognitive scientists and psychologists when it comes to talk about the self. Well-known philosophical problems in causality, subjectivity, empiricism, free will (...)
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  10.  79
    The Myths We Live By.Mary Midgley - 2003 - Routledge.
    Mary Midgley argues in her powerful new book that far from being the opposite of science, myth is a central part of it. In brilliant prose, she claims that myths are neither lies nor mere stories but a network of powerful symbols that suggest particular ways of interpreting the world.
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  11.  44
    Can't We Make Moral Judgements?Mary Midgley - 1991 - St. Martin's Press.
    In this book, Mary Midgely turns a spotlight on the fashionable view that we no longer need or use moral judgements. She shows how the question of whether or not we can make moral judgements must inevitably affect our attitudes to the law and its institutions, but also to events that occur in our daily lives.
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  12. Rights, Killing, and Suffering.R. G. Frey, Mary Midgley & Tom Regan - 1985 - Ethics 96 (1):192-195.
     
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  13. Philosophical Plumbing.Mary Midgley - 1992 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 33:139-151.
    Is philosophy like plumbing? I have made this comparison a number of times when I have wanted to stress that philosophising is not just grand and elegant and difficult, but is also needed. It is not optional. The idea has caused mild surprise, and has sometimes been thought rather undignified. The question of dignity is a very interesting one, and I shall come back to it at the end of this article. But first, I would like to work the comparison (...)
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  14.  2
    Science and Poetry.Mary Midgley - 2001 - Routledge.
    Crude materialism, reduction of mind to body, extreme individualism. All products of a 17th century scientific inheritance which looks at the parts of our existence at the expense of the whole. Cutting through myths of scientific omnipotence, Mary Midgley explores how this inheritance has so powerfully shaped the way we are, and the problems it has brought with it. She argues that poetry and the arts can help reconcile these problems, and counteract generations of 'one-eyed specialists', unable and unwilling to (...)
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  15.  61
    Wisdom, Information, and Wonder: What is Knowledge For?Mary Midgley - 1989 - Routledge.
    InWisdom, Information and Wonder, Mary Midgley tackles the question at the root of our civilization: What is knowledge for?
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  16. Trying Out One's New Sword.Mary Midgley - forthcoming - Ethics in the Workplace: Selected Readings in Business Ethics.
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  17. Beast and Man: The Roots of Human Nature.Mary Midgley - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (212):270-273.
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  18.  63
    The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom and Morality.Mary Midgley - 1994 - Routledge.
    In The Ethical Primate , Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the Times Literary Supplement , addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have come about.
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  19. Evolution as a Religion.Mary Midgley - 2008 - Filosoficky Casopis 56:129-133.
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  20.  19
    Evolution as a Religion: Strange Hopes and Stranger Fears.Mary Midgley - 1985 - Routledge.
    According to a profile in The Guardian , Mary Midgley is 'the foremost scourge of scientific pretensions in this country; someone whose wit is admired even by those who feel she sometimes oversteps the mark'. Considered one of Britain's finest philosophers, Midgley exposes the illogical logic of poor doctrines that shelter themselves behind the prestige of science. Always at home when taking on the high priests of evolutionary theory - Dawkins, Wilson and their acolytes - she has famously described evolution (...)
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  21. The Owl of Minerva: A Memoir.Mary Midgley - 2005 - Routledge.
    "Charming, interesting, thought-provoking and a great read." Rosalind Hursthouse The daughter of a pacifist rector who answered "No!" when his congregation asked him "Is everything in the bible true?", perhaps Mary Midgley was destined to become a philosopher. Yet few would have thought this inquisitive, untidy, nature-loving child would become "one of the sharpest critical pens in the west." This is her remarkable story. Probably the only philosopher to have been in Vienna on the eve of its invasion by Nazi (...)
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  22.  82
    The Game Game.Mary Midgley - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (189):231 - 253.
    Some time ago, an Innocent Bystander, after glancing through a copy of Mind , asked me, ‘Why do philosophers talk so much about Games? Do they play them a lot or something?’.
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  23.  23
    Alchemy RevivedClones and Clones: Facts and Fantasies About Human CloningImproving Nature? The Science and Ethics of Genetic EngineeringThe Biotech Century: Harnessing the Gene and Remaking the World.Mary Midgley, Martha C. Nussbaum, Cass R. Sunstein, Michael Reiss, Roger Straughan & Jeremy Rifkin - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (2):41.
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  24.  1
    Science as Salvation: A Modern Myth and Its Meaning.Mary Midgley - 1992 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 34 (3):185-187.
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  25. The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom, and Morality.Mary Midgley - 1994 - Routledge.
    In _The Ethical Primate_, Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the _Times Literary Supplement_, addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have come about.
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  26.  2
    Wickedness: A Philosophical Essay.Mary Midgley - 2001 - Routledge.
    To look into the darkness of the human soul is a frightening venture. Here Mary Midgley does so, with her customary brilliance and clarity. Midgley's analysis proves that the capacity for real wickedness is an inevitable part of human nature. This is not however a blanket acceptance of evil. Out of this dark journey she returns with an offering to us: an understanding of human nature that enhances our very humanity.
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  27.  11
    Wickedness.Mary Midgley - 2001 - The Philosophers' Magazine 16:23-26.
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  28.  7
    Wickedness.Mary Midgley - 2001 - The Philosophers' Magazine 14:23-25.
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  29.  33
    Heart and Mind.Diane Collinson & Mary Midgley - 1983 - Philosophical Quarterly 33 (133):410.
    First published in 1983. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  30. Wickedness: A Philosophical Essay.Mary Midgley & Ronald D. Milo - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (236):269-272.
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  31. The End of Anthropocentrism?Mary Midgley - 1994 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 36:103-112.
    Are human beings in some sense central to the cosmos? It used to seem obvious that they were. It seems less obvious now. But the idea is still powerful in our thinking, and it may be worth while asking just what it has meant.
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  32. The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom and Morality.Mary Midgley - 1994 - Philosophy 70 (274):598-601.
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  33.  55
    Selfish Genes and Social Darwinism.Mary Midgley - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (225):365.
    Exchanging views in Philosophy with a two-year time-lag is getting rather like conversation with the Andromeda Nebula. I am distressed that my reply to Messrs Mackie and Dawkins, explaining what made me write so crossly about The Selfish Gene , has been so long delayed. Mr Mackie's sudden death in December 1981 adds a further dimension to this distress.
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  34. Evolution as a Religion: Strange Hopes and Stranger Fears.Mary Midgley - 1987 - Religious Studies 23 (2):300-302.
     
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  35.  1
    Heart and Mind: The Varieties of Moral Experience.Mary Midgley - 1981 - Routledge.
    With a new introduction by the author. It is a book of superb spirit and style, more entertaining than a work of philosophy has any right to be.’ – Times Literary Supplement. Throughout our lives we are making moral choices. Some decisions simply direct our everyday comings and goings; others affect our individual destinies. How do we make those choices? Where does our sense of right and wrong come from, and how can we make more informed decisions? In clear, entertaining (...)
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  36.  35
    Brutality and Sentimentality.Mary Midgley - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (209):385 - 389.
    The notion that concern for the feelings of animals is as such sentimental is rather a common one. I shall suggest that, in general, the charge of sentimentality can never be made to stick in this way merely because concern is directed towards one class of sentient beings rather than another. It rests on the motives and reasons for being concerned, not on the objects to which concern is directed. About animals, however, a special point arises which I must deal (...)
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  37.  40
    The Concept of Beastliness: Philosophy, Ethics and Animal Behaviour.Mary Midgley - 1973 - Philosophy 48 (184):111 - 135.
  38.  20
    A Golden Manifesto, Part II.Mary Midgley - 2016 - Philosophy Now 117:20-23.
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  39.  65
    Why The Idea Of Purpose Won't Go Away.Mary Midgley - 2011 - Philosophy 86 (4):545-561.
    Biologists' current habit of explaining each feature of human life separately through its evolutionary function — its assumed tendency to enhance each individual's reproductive prospects — is unworkable. It also sits oddly with these scientists' official rejection of teleology, since it treats all life as a process which does have an aim, namely, to perpetuate itself. But that aim is empty because it is circular. If we want to understand the behaviour of living things (including humans) we have to treat (...)
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  40.  58
    Utopias, Dolphins and Computers: Problems in Philosophical Plumbing.Mary Midgley - 1996 - Routledge.
    In Utopias, Dolphins and Computers Mary Midgley brings philosophy into the real world by using it to consider environmental, educational and gender issues. From "Freedom, Feminism and War" to "Artificial Intelligence and Creativity," this book searches for what is distorting our judgement and helps us to see more clearly the dramas which are unfolding in the world around us. Utopias, Dolphins and Computers aims to counter today's anti-intellectualism, not to mention philosophy's twentieth-century view of itself as futile. Mary Midgley explains (...)
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  41.  3
    Utopias, Dolphins and Computers: Problems in Philosophical Plumbing.Mary Midgley - 1996 - Routledge.
    Why do the big philosophical questions so often strike us as far-fetched and little to with everyday life? Mary Midgley shows that it need not be that way; she shows that there is a need for philosophy in the real world. Her popularity as one of our foremost philosophers is based on a no-nonsense, down-to-earth approach to fundamental human problems, philosphical or otherwise. In _Utopias, Dolphins and Computers_ she makes her case for philosophy as a difficult but necessary tool for (...)
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  42. Wisdom, Information and Wonder: What Is Knowledge For?Mary Midgley - 1989 - Philosophy 65 (252):236-237.
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  43.  10
    Beasts Versus the Biosphere?Mary Midgley - 1992 - Environmental Values 1 (Summer):113-121.
    Apparent clashes of interest between 'deep ecologists' and 'animal liberationists' can be understood as differences in emphasis rather than conflicts of principle, although it is only too easy for campaigners to regard as rivals good causes other than their own. Moral principles are part of a larger whole, within which they can be related, rather than absolute all-purpose rules of right conduct. This is illustrated using the practical dilemma which often occurs in conservation management, of whether or not to cull (...)
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  44.  2
    The Solitary Self: Darwin and the Selfish Gene.Mary Midgley - 2010 - Routledge.
    Renowned philosopher Mary Midgley explores the nature of our moral constitution to challenge the view that reduces human motivation to self-interest. Midgley argues cogently and convincingly that simple, one-sided accounts of human motives, such as the 'selfish gene' tendency in recent neo-Darwinian thought, may be illuminating but are always unrealistic. Such neatness, she shows, cannot be imposed on human psychology. She returns to Darwin's original writings to show how the reductive individualism which is now presented as Darwinism does not derive (...)
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  45.  13
    The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom and Morality.Susan Wolf & Mary Midgley - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (1):131.
    This short, readable book, aimed at a popular audience, is concerned to show that a naturalistic view of humankind can be reconciled with a commitment to morality and a belief in human freedom.
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  46.  32
    The Absence of a Gap Between Facts and Values.Mary Midgley & Stephen R. L. Clark - 1980 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 54 (1):207 - 240.
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  47.  15
    Animal Sacrifices: Religious Perspectives on the Use of Animals in Science.Mary Midgley - 1987 - Ethics 97 (4):879-881.
  48.  19
    Reductivism, Fatalism and Sociobiology.Mary Midgley - 1984 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):107-114.
  49.  65
    Can Education Be Moral?Mary Midgley - 1996 - Res Publica 2 (1):77-85.
  50.  15
    Consequentialism and Common SensePractical Ethics. [REVIEW]Mary Midgley & Peter Singer - 1980 - Hastings Center Report 10 (5):43.
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