11 found
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  1.  12
    Explaining financial and prosocial biases in favor of attractive people: Interdisciplinary perspectives from economics, social psychology, and evolutionary psychology.Dario Maestripieri, Andrea Henry & Nora Nickels - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  2.  41
    Sex differences in interest in infants across the lifespan.Dario Maestripieri & Suzanne Pelka - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (3):327-344.
    This study investigated sex differences in interest in infants among children, adolescents, young adults, and older individuals. Interest in infants was assessed with responses to images depicting animal and human infants versus adults, and with verbal responses to questionnaires. Clear sex differences, irrespective of age, emerged in all visual and verbal tests, with females being more interested in infants than males. Male interest in infants remained fairly stable across the four age groups, whereas female interest in infants was highest in (...)
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  3.  18
    Maternal encouragement in nonhuman primates and the question of animal teaching.Dario Maestripieri - 1995 - Human Nature 6 (4):361-378.
    Most putative cases of teaching in nonhuman animals involve parent-offspring interactions. The interpretation of these cases, particularly with regard to the cognitive processes involved, is controversial. Qualitative and quantitative observations made in nonhuman primates suggest that, in some species, mothers encourage their infants’ independent locomotion and that encouragement can be considered a form of instruction. In macaques, experience in raising previous offspring accounts in part for variability between mothers in propensity to encourage infant motor skills. Parsimony suggests that the cognitive (...)
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  4. Human Nature.Dario Maestripieri - 2017 - Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture 1 (1):85-88.
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  5.  29
    The importance of comparative and phylogenetic analyses in the study of adaptation.James R. Roney & Dario Maestripieri - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):525-525.
    Homology can provide strong evidence against exapted learning mechanism (ELM) explanations for psychological and behavioral traits. Homologous traits are constructed by commonly inherited developmental mechanisms. As such, demonstration of homology for a trait argues for its construction by an inherited rather than an exapted developmental process. We conclude that comparative evidence can play an important evidentiary role within evolutionary psychology.
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  6.  18
    Infant colic: Re-evaluating the adaptive hypotheses.Dario Maestripieri & Kristina M. Durante - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):468-469.
    Colic may allow infants to obtain additional investment from their parents. The lack of clear fitness costs of colic and of differences in condition between colicky and non-colicky infants is inconsistent with the hypotheses that colic is an honest signal of need or vigor. These and other characteristics of colic, however, are consistent with the hypothesis that colic is a manipulative signal.
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  7.  22
    Costs and benefits of female aggressiveness in humans and other mammals.Dario Maestripieri & Kelly A. Carroll - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):231-232.
    Sex differences in aggressive behavior are probably adaptive but the costs and benefits of risky aggression to women and men may be different from those suggested in Campbell's target article. Moreover, sex differences are more likely to reflect differences in the costs of aggression to females and males rather than differences in its benefits.
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  8.  15
    Teaching in Marine mammals? Anecdotes versus science.Dario Maestripieri & Jessica Whitham - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):342-343.
    The use of anecdotes is not a viable research strategy to study animal culture. Social learning processes can often be documented with careful quantitative analyses of observational data. Unfortunately, suggestions that killer whales engage in teaching are entirely based on subjective interpretations of qualitative observations. Thus, of teaching in killer whales cannot be used to argue for the occurrence of culture in marine mammals.
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  9.  6
    Moving forward with interdisciplinary research on attractiveness-related biases.Dario Maestripieri, Andrea Henry & Nora Nickels - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    In our response, we review and address the comments on our target article made in the 25 commentaries. First, we review and discuss the commentaries that recognized the value of our approach, accepted the main premises and conclusions of our target article, and suggested further avenues for research on attractiveness-related biases. We then respond to commentators who either misinterpreted some parts of our target article or made statements with which we disagree. These commentaries provided us with an opportunity to clarify (...)
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  10.  22
    Relative digit lengths predict men’s behavior and attractiveness during social interactions with women.James R. Roney & Dario Maestripieri - 2004 - Human Nature 15 (3):271-282.
    Recent evidence suggests that the ratio of the lengths of the second and fourth fingers (2D:4D) may reflect degree of prenatal androgen exposure in humans. In the present study, we tested the hypotheses that 2D:4D would be associated with ratings of men’s attractiveness and with levels of behavioral displays during social interactions with potential mates. Our results confirm that male 2D:4D was significantly negatively correlated with women’s ratings of men’s physical attractiveness and levels of courtship-like behavior during a brief conversation. (...)
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  11.  7
    The contribution of comparative research to the development and testing of life history models of human attachment and reproductive strategies.Dario Maestripieri - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):37-38.
    Research with nonhuman primates can make important contributions to life history models of human attachment and reproductive strategies, such as: including parental responsiveness into female reproductive strategies, testing the assumption that adult attachment is a reproductive adaptation, assessing genetic and environmental effects on attachment and reproduction, and investigating the mechanisms through which early stress results in accelerated reproductive maturation.
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