Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Commentary on "A Man of No Substance: The Philosopher in Plato's Gorgias," by S. Montgomery Ewegen.Joseph M. Forte - forthcoming - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Lysis on Loving One's Own.David K. Glidden - 1981 - Classical Quarterly 31 (01):39-59.
    Cicero, Lucullus 38: ‘…non potest animal ullum non adpetere id quod accommodatum ad naturam adpareat …’ From earliest childhood every man wants to possess something. One man collects horses. Another wants gold. Socrates has a passion for companions. He would rather have a good friend than a quail or a rooster. In this way, Socrates begins his interrogation of Menexenus. He then congratulates Menexenus and Lysis for each having what he himself still does not possess. How is it that one (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Aristotle’s Considered View of the Path to Knowledge.James H. Lesher - 2012 - In Lesher James H. (ed.), El espíritu y la letra: un homenaje a Alfonso Gomez-Lobo. Ediciones Colihue. pp. 127-145.
    I argue that these inconsistencies in wording and practice reflect the existence of two distinct Aristotelian views of inquiry, one peculiar to the Posterior Analytics and the other put forward in the Physics and practiced in the Physics and in other treatises. Although the two views overlap to some degree (e.g. both regard a rudimentary understanding of the subject as an essential first stage), the view of the syllogism as the workhorse of scientific investigation and the related view of inquiry (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ciencia y dialéctica en Acerca del cielo de Aristóteles.Manuel Berron - 2016 - Ediciones UNL.
  • Commentary on Kelsey.Raphael Woolf - 2000 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):122-133.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Phaedo and Republic V on essences.F. C. White - 1978 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 98:142-156.
    Towards the close of Book V of theRepublicPlato tells us that the true philosopher has knowledge and that the objects of knowledge are the Forms. By contrast, the ‘lovers of sights and sounds’, he tells us, have no more than belief, the objects of which are physical particulars. He then goes on to present us with some very radical-sounding assertions about the nature of these physical particulars. They are bearers of opposite properties, he says, in so thorough-going a manner that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • On Essences in the Cratylus.F. C. White - 1978 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 16 (3):259-274.
  • Comparing Lives in Plato, Laws 5.James Warren - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (4):319-346.
    In Laws 5, the Athenian argues in favour of virtuous over vicious lives on the basis that the former are preferable to the latter when we consider the pleasures and pains in each. This essay offers an interpretation of the argument which does not attribute to the Athenian an exclusively hedonist axiology. It argues for a new reading of the division of ‘types of life’ at 733c-d and suggests that the Athenian relies on the conclusion established earlier in the Laws (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pathos, Pleasure and the Ethical Life in Aristippus.Kristian Urstad - 2009 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy.
    For many of the ancient Greek philosophers, the ethical life was understood to be closely tied up with important notions like rational integrity, self-control, self-sufficiency, and so on. Because of this, feeling or passion (pathos), and in particular, pleasure, was viewed with suspicion. There was a general insistence on drawing up a sharp contrast between a life of virtue on the one hand and one of pleasure on the other. While virtue was regarded as rational and as integral to advancing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Sophist 237-239.George Rudebusch - 1991 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 29 (4):521-531.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Imitating the Cosmos: The Role of Microcosm–Macrocosm Relationships in the Hippocratic Treatise On Regimen.Laura Rosella Schluderer - 2018 - Classical Quarterly 68 (1):31-52.
    The paper provides an innovative interpretation of the treatise De Victu, showing that, though Heraclitean, Anaxagorean and Empedoclean borrowings in the work are certainly pervasive, the author also develops a sophisticated and multi-purpose explanatory framework, which, being based on an original conception of the nature of man, the cosmos and the relationship between the two, provides an effective foundation for the medical enterprise, allowing him to propose his dietetics as a ‘way of life’. At the core of this enterprise is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Commentary on Long.Stanley Rosen - 1996 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):152-162.
  • Parmenides and Plato's Parmenides.J. M. Rist - 1970 - Classical Quarterly 20 (2):221-229.
    In two of his dialogues especially, the Sophist and the Parmenides, Plato concerns himself at length with problems presented by the Eleatics. Despite difficulties in the interpretation of individual passages, the Sophist has in general proved the less difficult to understand, and since some of the problems at issue in the two works indicate the same or similar preoccupations in Plato's mind, it is worth considering how far an interpretation of the ‘easier’ dialogue can be used to forward an interpretation (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Fate, fortune, chance, and luck in chinese and greek: A comparative semantic history.Lisa Ann Raphals - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (4):537-574.
    : The semantic fields and root metaphors of "fate" in Classical Greece and pre-Buddhist China are surveyed here. The Chinese material focuses on the Warring States, the Han, and the reinvention of the earlier lexicon in contemporary Chinese terms for such concepts as risk, randomness, and (statistical) chance. The Greek study focuses on Homer, Parmenides, the problem of fate and necessity, Platonic daimons, and the "On Fate" topos in Hellenistic Greece. The study ends with a brief comparative metaphorology of metaphors (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Four Causes of ADHD: Aristotle in the Classroom.Marino Pérez-Álvarez - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Air as Noēsis and Soul in Diogenes of Apollonia.Rhodes Pinto - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (1):1-24.
    _ Source: _Volume 63, Issue 1, pp 1 - 24 This article examines Diogenes of Apollonia’s doctrines of intellection and soul in relation to his material principle, air. It argues that for Diogenes both intellection and soul are not, as commonly thought, some sort of air, even though both intellection and soul are to be understood in terms of air and the system of τρόποι of air that he has set up. These new interpretations of intellection and soul yield insight (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Democritus and secondary qualities.Robert Pasnau - 2007 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):99-121.
    Democritus is generally understood to have anticipated the seventeenthcentury distinction between primary and secondary qualities. I argue that this is not the case, and that instead for Democritus all sensible qualities are conventional.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Spatiality of Pain.Abraham Olivier - 2006 - South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):336-349.
    How far can one ascribe a spatial meaning to pain? When I have a pain, for instance, in my leg, how should one understand the “in” in the “pain in my leg”? I argue (contrary to Noordhof) that pain does have a spatial meaning, but (contrary to Tye) that the spatiality of pain is not to be understood in the standard sense of spatial enclosure. Instead, spatiality has a special meaning with regard to pain. By defining pain in phenomenological terms (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Protagoras’ great speech.A. R. Nathan - 2017 - Classical Quarterly 67 (2):380-399.
    This article seeks to present a detailed textual analysis of Protagoras’ Great Speech in Plato'sProtagoras. I will argue that the concept of ἀρετή as it appears in the Great Speech is whittled down to a vague notion of civic duty. In this respect, Protagoras is bringing himself in line with the democracy, but in doing so the ἀρετή he claims to teach loses much of its initial appeal, particularly in the eyes of his aristocratic clientele. Nevertheless, if thecontentof Protagoras’ Great (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Belief, Knowledge, and Learning in Plato's Middle Dialogues.Michael L. Morgan - 1983 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 13 (sup1):63-100.
    There is a problem about belief and knowledge in Plato's epistemology that has exercised serious students of Plato only to settle into a recent orthodoxy. Guthrie characterizes the problem and its current resolution this way: ‘In the Meno doxa appeared to be a dim apprehension of the same objects of which knowledge is a clear and complete understanding … in the Republic each is directed to different objects, knowledge to the Forms and doxa to the sensible world alone … at (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pythagorean Cosmogony and Vedic Cosmogony (RV 10.129). Analogies and Differences.Julia Mendoza & Alberto Bernabé - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (1):32-51.
    Allusions to a cosmogony contained in a Vedic hymn present striking analogies to a cosmogony attributed to the Pythagoreans by Aristotle, Simplicius and Stobaeus. The aim of the paper is to evaluate the extent to which they are similar and to which their differences respond to different cultural premises.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Proto-Ionic Capital from Larisa.Eivind Lorenzen - 1993 - Centaurus 36 (1):1-21.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Lumière et Nuit, Féminin et Masculin chez Parménide d’Elée : quelques remarques.Gérard Journée - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (4):289-318.
    Abstract The great german Scholar, Eduard Zeller, suggested that the reference to male and female in Parmenides B12.5-6 was probably an allusion to the physical principles of `mortal opinion': Night and Light. This suggestion has been rejected by some scholars because such an association would lead us to admit that, in B12, male was associated with Night and female with Light, a theory which would be at odds with the supposed misogyny of Greek culture. However, Parmenides' account of `mortal opinion' (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • An Angel's View of Heaven: The Mystical Heliocentricity of Medieval Geocentric Cosmology.Keith Hutchison - 2012 - History of Science 50 (1):33-74.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The memory of virtue: Achieving immortality in Plato's symposium.Anthony Hooper - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):543-557.
    The prospect of human immortality is manifest in many of Plato's writings, appearing as early as the Apology and the Crito, and as late as Book 12 of the Laws. But nowhere is immortality given so much attention, nor as central a place in Plato's philosophical projects, as in what have traditionally been referred to as his Middle Period works, so it is hardly surprising that we find an extensive treatment of the subject of immortality in Socrates’ own encomium in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Xenophon's Defence of Socrates: The Rhetorical Background to the Socratic Problem.V. J. Gray - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (1):136-140.
    The death of Socrates gave birth to an industry of biographical literature which often took the form of a defence or prosecution, sometimes purporting to be the actual defence or prosecution conducted at his trial. Plato and Xenophon wrote works in his defence. Among his critics, one Polycrates had a certain notoriety. Lysias, Theodectes and Demetrius of Phalerum, orators and rhetoricians like Polycrates, were credited with further works of apology. There were doubtless many others. The aim of this paper is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Unity of Intellect in Aristotle's De Anima.Lloyd Gerson - 2004 - Phronesis 49 (4):348-373.
    Desperately difficult texts inevitably elicit desperate hermeneutical measures. Aristotle's De Anima, book three, chapter five, is evidently one such text. At least since the time of Alexander of Aphrodisias, scholars have felt compelled to draw some remarkable conclusions regarding Aristotle's brief remarks in this passage regarding intellect. One such claim is that in chapter five, Aristotle introduces a second intellect, the so-called 'agent intellect', an intellect distinct from the 'passive intellect', the supposed focus of discussion up until this passage.1 This (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Commentary on Bobonich.Jyl Gentzler - 1995 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):140-153.
    Bobonich argues that, in the Laws, Plato is committed to the view that the goodness of all goods entirely distinct from virtue is dependent on the virtue of their possessor. He suggests further that Plato's commitment to this dependency thesis is best explained by Plato's commitment to two other theses: (1) that knowledge is sufficient for all virtue, and (2) that the goodness of goods entirely distinct from virtue depends on their possessor's knowledge of the nature of their goodness. While (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Herodotos and his contemporaries.Robert L. Fowler - 1996 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 116:62-87.
  • The Historian of Philosophy and His Experience: Within and Beyond the Realm of Philosophy.Alexandr V. Dyakov - 2019 - Russian Journal of Philosophical Sciences 62 (10):43-54.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dialectical Strategic Planning in Aristotle.Iovan Drehe - 2015 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 2 (3):287–309.
    The purpose of this paper is to give an account and a rational reconstruction of the heuristic advice provided by Aristotle in the Topics and Prior Analytics in regard to the difficulty or ease of strategic planning in the context of a dialectical dialogue. The general idea is that a Questioner can foresee what his refutational syllogism would have to look like given the character of the thesis defended by the Answerer, and therefore plan accordingly. A rational reconstruction of this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Colloquium 9.Deborah De Chiara-Quenzer - 1990 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1):360-370.
  • The Idea of the Social Contract in the History of ‘Agreementism’.Andre Santos Campos - 2019 - The European Legacy 24 (6):579-596.
    ABSTRACTOne of the recurrent motifs in political thought is the idea of the social contract, according to which a society, a government, or moral principles depend for their existence on agreements...
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Responsibility and Justice in Aristotle’s Non-Voluntary and Mixed Actions.Andre Santos Campos - 2013 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 7 (2):100.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Colloquium 8.Ruby Blondell - 1998 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):213-238.
  • Filosofia e mistérios: leitura do Proêmio de Parmênides.Alberto Bernabé - 2013 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 10:37-55.
    Tem-se analisado, recorrentemente, a influência de Homero e de Hesíodo no proêmio do poema de Parmênides. As possíveis influências da poesia órfica tem sido apenas consideradas. Todavia, diversas descobertas de textos órficos aconselham voltar a analisar os vestígios da tradição mistérica, em geral, e órfica, em particular, no poema do filósofo de Eléia, sem minimizar, com isso, as outras influências já postas em relevo. O autor assinalou, em um trabalho anterior, algumas conexões entre Parmênides e os textos órficos; neste artigo, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Anaxagoras, the Thoroughgoing Infinitist: The Relation between his Teachings on Multitude and on Heterogeneity.Miloš Arsenijević, Saša Popović & Miloš Vuletić - 2019 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 15 (1):35-70.
    In the analysis of Anaxagoras’ physics in view of the relation between his teachings on multitude and heterogeneity, two central questions emerge: 1) How can the structure of the universe considered purely mereo-topologically help us explain that at the first cosmic stage no qualitative difference is manifest in spite of the fact that the entire qualitative heterogeneity is supposedly already present there? 2) How can heterogeneity become manifest at the second stage, resulting from the noûs intervention, if according to fragment (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Archives or Palimpsests? Bacterial Genomes Unveil a Scenario for the Origin of Life.Antoine Danchin - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (1):52-61.
    The three processes needed to create life, compartmentalization, metabolism, and information transfer (memory stored in nucleic acids and manipulation operated by proteins) are embedded in organized genome features. The core of life puts together growth and maintenance (which drives survival), while life in context explores and exploits specific niches. Analysis of gene persistence in a large number of genomes shows that the former constitutes the paleome, which recapitulates the three phases of the origin of life: metabolism of small molecules on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Case of Theaetetus.Gokhan Adalier - 2001 - Phronesis 46 (1):1-37.
    Any comprehensive interpretation of the "Theaetetus" has to provide answers to, among others, two very general questions concerning that dialogue: "What is Plato's relation to the problems faced in the "Theaetetus"?" and "What is the significance of the absence of the Forms from the discussion of the "Theaetetus", given their undoubted relevance to the topic of the dialogue, i.e. knowledge?" Predominantly, the answer given to the first question in the literature has been that the problems are those that Plato is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Homeomeric Lines in Greek Mathematics.Fabio Acerbi - 2010 - Science in Context 23 (1):1-37.
    ArgumentThis article presents ancient documents on the subject of homeomeric lines. On the basis of such documents, the article reconstructs a definition of the notion as well as a proof of the result, which is left unproved in extant sources, that there are only three homeomeric lines: the straight line, the circumference, and the cylindrical helix. A point of particular historiographic interest is that homeomeric lines were the only class of lines defined directly as the extension of a mathematical property, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Plato's Protagoras the Hedonist.Joshua Wilburn - 2016 - Classical Philology 113 (3):224-244.
    I advocate an ad hominem reading of the hedonism that appears in the final argument of the Protagoras. I that attribute hedonism both to the Many and to Protagoras, but my focus is on the latter. I argue that the Protagoras in various ways reflects Plato’s view that the sophist is an inevitable advocate for, and himself implicitly inclined toward, hedonism, and I show that the text aims through that characterization to undermine Protagoras’ status as an educator. One of my (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Die Ursächlichkeit des unbewegten Bewegers.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2014 - Helikon. A Multidisciplinary Online Journal 3:99-118.
    This paper looks at the causal activity of the unmoved mover of Aristotle. The author affirms both the efficient causality of God and his teleological role. According to Aristotle, the main explanation, by describing God, is ‘thinking on thinking’. That means his most important factor to act cannot only ‘be aimed’ but must also ‘be thought’. The final causality is based on the higher energeia what owns the efficient cause, since the energeia itself is regarded by Aristotle as good. God (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Method of Hypothesis in Plato's Philosophy.Malihe Aboie Mehrizi - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Investigations at University of Tabriz 10 (19):1-21.
    The article deals with the examination of method of hypothesis in Plato's philosophy. This method, respectively, will be examined in three dialogues of Meno, Phaedon and Republic in which it is explicitly indicated. It will be shown the process of change of Plato’s attitude towards the position and usage of the method of hypothesis in his realm of philosophy. In Meno, considering the geometry, Plato attempts to introduce a method that can be used in the realm of philosophy. But, ultimately (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Uma revisão da alegação de Aristóteles sobre as crenças fundamentais dos Pitagóricos: tudo é número?Gabriele Cornelli - 2016 - Filosofia Unisinos 17 (1):50-57.
    A pergunta, “Tudo é número?” no título do famoso artigo de 1989 de Zhmud, deixa aberto um desafio para o extremamente importante testemunho aristotélico de que “tudo é número” era a definição fundamental da filosofia pitagórica. Tal desafio não é nada simples, especialmente quando se considera que, até então, as histórias tanto da filosofia quanto da matemática antiga parecem não ter dúvidas de que esta afirmação é correta. Este artigo pretende submeter à avaliação crítica a alegação de Aristóteles de que (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Parmenides and the Question of Being in Greek Thought.Raul Corazzon - unknown
    This page is dedicated to an analysis of the first section of Parmenides' Poem, the Way of Truth, with a selection of critical judgments by the most important commentators and critics. In the Annotated Bibliography I list the main critical editions (from the first printed edition of 1573 to present days) and the translations in English, French, German, Italian and Spanish, with a selection of studies on Parmenides; in future, a section will be dedicated to an examination of some critical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mjera – od matematike do etike.Luka Boršić - 2007 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 27 (4):751-764.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Does Plato Make Room for Negative Forms in His Ontology?Necip Fikri Alican - 2017 - Cosmos and History 13 (3):154–191.
    Plato seems to countenance both positive and negative Forms, that is to say, both good and bad ones. He may not say so outright, but he invokes both and rejects neither. The apparent finality of this impression creates a lack of direct interest in the subject: Plato scholars do not give negative Forms much thought except as the prospect relates to something else they happen to be doing. Yet when they do give the matter any thought, typically for the sake (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pedagogical Views of Plato in his Dialogues.Marina Nasaina - 2019 - Open Journal for Studies in Philosophy 3 (1):7-16.
    Plato, through the dialogues of Republic, Laws, Protagoras, Menon, The Symposium and Theetitos, links inherently education with state stability. The proper functioning of the state machinery presupposes education and seeks the first foundation of political and social stability. The role of education at the social and political level is enormous, since it believes that the political instability of its time, the corruption of institutions and morals should be addressed through a political and social reform, based in particular on a rigorous (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Relation between Names and Things in Crtylus and its Relation to the Problem of Nomos and Phusis.Amirhossein Saket - 2019 - Journal of Philosophical Investigations 13 (26):195-212.
    The question concerning names and things discussed in Cratylus, repeats the old and fundamental philosophical subject of "phusis" and "nomos"; an essential issue which may be considered as the ground for many theories in Greek philosophy. The question In Cratylus is how relates a name to its object or thing to which the name refers. Are names by nature, i.e. is there any necessary relation between a name and its object, or as long as there is a convention, an object (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • El término bárbaros: un análisis discursivo de los testimonios tempranos.Gastón Javier Basile - 2013 - Argos (Universidad Simón Bolívar) 36 (2):113-134.
    El artículo reexamina individualmente los escasos testimonios pre-clásicos en los que se verifica por primera vez el término bárbaros. Se instrumentará un enfoque discursivo en relación con la ocurrencia del término en las fuentes arcaicas -atento al plano morfosintáctico, semántico y pragmático- con el objeto de obtener indicios y formulaciones de conjunto que puedan enriquecer el debate en torno a la génesis de la voz bárbaros y, en especial, contribuir a echar luz sobre las múltiples connotaciones semánticas que adquirirá el (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark